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  1. #1

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    Yesterday in my shelter in place time, I decided to put on a set of Pyramid flatwound 12s on my ES-175. Previously, it had D'Addario roundwound 11s. After I set it up, I reset the action and intonation and everything is fine, except for the G string. At the 12th fret, it is incredibly sharp -- so much so that I can't compensate for it with the T.O.M. bridge. Any ideas?

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  3. #2

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    could try moving the entire bridge base back enough so g string intonates..and move rest of individual tom saddles up a tad


    luck

    cheers

  4. #3

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    Sounds like you went from an unwound G set to a wound G set, or the other way around. Do you recall which way it is?

  5. #4

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    What neatomic said- move the whole bridge back as far as you can while moving the saddles forward under the other strings and keeping them intonated. This will be limited by the furthest forward (towards the nut) saddle, which might be the G string. Another possibility might be flipping the G saddle around so the flat side faces the nut, which will let you move it forward farther, if the slanted side is facing forward.

  6. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by Greentone
    Sounds like you went from an unwound G set to a wound G set, or the other way around. Do you recall which way it is?
    I guess I went found unwound to wound, but the wound is flatwound. I've tried moving the entire bridge, but the degree of sharpness at the 12th fret is too great to make it work.

  7. #6

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    It could be a bad string.

  8. #7

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  9. #8

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    With an unwound G-string, the bridge saddle under that string will be compensated pretty far towards the tailpiece. With a wound G-string, it will be almost flush with the neck end of the bridge base. The advice to flip the saddle piece for that string around is good advice. It will let you put the intonation so that the wound G-string is right at the limit of the adjustment towards the neck. Then, you can have the other strings adjusted as necessary. The first picture shows the G-string saddle back--for an unwound string. The second picture is tough to figure out, but it shows the saddle turned around, with the saddle adjusted full forward--for a wound G-string.
    Gibson ES-175 Intonation Problem-unwound-g-jpgGibson ES-175 Intonation Problem-wound-g-jpg

  10. #9

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    If your flatwound G is intonated, could you intonate the other 5 strings by moving their saddles? Set your G saddle in the middle position of the TOM, intonate by moving the bridge base backwards (since you said it was sharp previously). Are you able to intonate the other strings or do you run out of saddle travel?

    The trick is to set the travel of the E saddles at their maximum travel, move the bridge base to intonate the E strings with as little adjustment of their saddles as possible-pretend they are fixed- then intonate the inner four strings around the outer E pair. The bridge base is moveable, not fixed like a TOM mounted on posts.

  11. #10

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    Ss has it use another string.

  12. #11

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    one other thing,

    pyramid strings are handwound precision strings made in germany...that flatwound g string probably costs around 5$...

    check the integrity of your g string tuning post wrap...pyramid flats have round cores..and if not installed exactly right...can have the windings separate at the tuning post....causing all sorts of intonation troubles


    cheers