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  1. #1

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    Looking for a larger diameter 346 rounded triangle type pick; something akin to a Clayton acetal rounded triangle in size and material but thicker. They go as high as 1.9mm which I'm using at the moment and is a nice thickness. Are there any out there that are around 2.5mm?
    Attached Images Attached Images Looking for thick 346 pick (2mm+)-prod_20940078740-jpeg 

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    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #2

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    V-picks:
    Guitar Picks & Mandolin Picks by V-PICKS | American Made Guitar Picks


    from Djangobooks, mostly Wegen-branded:
    Picks

    found these at NAMM a couple of years back:
    Webshop - ChickenPicks guitar picks

    from Dunlop:
    TRI STUBBY PICK 2.00MM - Dunlop
    TRI STUBBY PICK 3.00MM - Dunlop

    For some reason, I don't get along with the Stubby picks, but I have samples of V-picks, Wegen, and Chicken Picks that I use on a regular basis, along with a pile of stiff picks from other makers. Plenty of other options out there as well.
    Last edited by Hammertone; 02-20-2020 at 04:35 AM.

  4. #3

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    Blue Chip TAD100

    TAD100 - BlueChip Picks

  5. #4

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    Check out Gravity Striker picks at Sweetwater

  6. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jabberwocky
    Blue Chip TAD100

    TAD100 - BlueChip Picks
    $75? I thought they were around $30, and I thought that was absurd.

  7. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by corpse
    $75? I thought they were around $30, and I thought that was absurd.
    From 0.035" up to 0.060" they are $35 each. 0.080" costs $50 each. 0.100" aka 2.5mm is twice the thickness of 0.050", thus about twice the cost. The material, Dupont Vespel, is expensive as a rectangular sheet. It is hard to work with and there is expensive wastage.

    T-I GB strings are about $36 a set and lasts, what?, 6 months. A $75 pick that lasts a lifetime and helps your playing is not absurd. You never have to replace it. I have four of them, one in each case of my favourite guitars. Picks can be very cheap but they don't always have to be very cheap. OK, I understand some see picks as disposables and are in the habit of using one for a few songs and then throwing it away. You go through more than a gross in a year. A gross of Fender Mediums is about $72. That lasts about a year. Compare that with a $75 that lasts a lifetime. $75 is cheap; the second year onwards it is free till you croak. Unless you lose it because "picks are meant to be lost", then it gets expensive. Moral of story: don't toss your BC pick out to the raving crowd.

  8. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jabberwocky
    From 0.035" up to 0.060" they are $35 each. 0.080" costs $50 each. 0.100" aka 2.5mm is twice the thickness of 0.050", thus about twice the cost. The material, Dupont Vespel, is expensive as a rectangular sheet. It is hard to work with and there is expensive wastage.

    T-I GB strings are about $36 a set and lasts, what?, 6 months. A $75 pick that lasts a lifetime and helps your playing is not absurd. You never have to replace it. I have four of them, one in each case of my favourite guitars. Picks can be very cheap but they don't always have to be very cheap. OK, I understand some see picks as disposables and are in the habit of using one for a few songs and then throwing it away. You go through more than a gross in a year. A gross of Fender Mediums is about $72. That lasts about a year. Compare that with a $75 that lasts a lifetime. $75 is cheap; the second year onwards it is free till you croak. Unless you lose it because "picks are meant to be lost", then it gets expensive. Moral of story: don't toss your BC pick out to the raving crowd.
    Good point. So they never get scratchy or wear down? That is pretty impressive.

  9. #8

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  10. #9

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    Dammit, thinking about picks again as I was on the Red Bear site, and I ordered another Tuff Tone Big Jazzer as a backup and their Mondo pick to try on for manouche.
    Last edited by JSanta; 02-19-2020 at 02:40 PM.

  11. #10

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    My Blue Chip picks show no wear after several years of use. Some get more use than others, of course. I started with a 40, which turned out to be thinner than I like, but I used it for a long time. Most picks I've used show some wear very quickly, but these show none. I don't tend to lose picks very often, and have a hundred or so on hand, including lots of freebies acquired over the years. I certainly haven't lost a Blue Chip pick. Once I thought I had, but it turned up in a different pocket.

  12. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by JSanta
    I am amused by the thought of the OP going through their website, given his initial question.

  13. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hammertone
    I am amused by the thought of the OP going through their website, given his initial question.
    I have had wonderful interactions with the people that own Red Bear, but their website design can be a bit tough to work through.

    For the OP, here are the size guides:

    Red Bear's Original Flat Picks come in five gauges and run in ranges as the material is sanded by hand. We attempt to end up in the mid-point of the range for a given gauge when we sand the material. For this reason, we cannot provide exact thicknesses, so please don't ask us to try. It is nearly impossible to do. Our intended goals for the ranges are as follows:

    Light 0.9 - 1.10mm, Medium 1.11-1.30mm or thereabouts, Heavy 1.30 - 1.65mm, Extra Heavy 1.65 to 2mm or so and Gypsy Jazzer 2.5 mm to 4mm or so. All these gauge specs are approximate. The picks may be plus or minus a few tenths of a millimeter. We try to make them somewhere in the middle of the ranges listed. Light gauge picks are not made with grips.

    GRIPS: We do not make light gauge picks with grips. We feel that the holes weaken the pick in the thin gauge. We are "on the fence" so to speak when it comes to putting grips in medium gauge. The heavier gauges are fine with the grips.

  14. #13

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    The Clayton's last me a good while. Probably about 6 months to a year, plus they have 3 tips; easy to turn it 120°. I may give v picks a shot, they are reasonable enough. I'm struggling very hard to see how anyone would ever, in their right mind, spend $75 on a guitar pick.
    I see your rationalization jabberwocky and would say maybe in the heavy metal realm does that sort of usage occur, but in jazz?