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  1. #1

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    Here's something you don't see everyday!

    Hank Garland's L7c - the one he recorded most of Jazz Winds From a New Direction with - is being sold by Hank Garland's estate for $175,000.

    A remarkable piece of guitar history, I truly hope it winds up in good hands.

    1957 Gibson L-7C Custom owned by Hank Garland | Reverb
    Last edited by Iced Tea; 02-18-2020 at 04:12 PM.

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    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #2

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  4. #3

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  5. #4

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  6. #5

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    Thanks, Dot, for the great recording. I never heard Hank before and love his pristine, fat sound and the clarity of his voice. Beautiful playing and masterful technique. Good playing . . . Marinero

  7. #6

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    Thanks for the link. Very cool. Some other fascinating and historically significant instruments for sale by Hank's Estate. Worth
    taking a look.

  8. #7

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    I would be surprised if they get a tenth of the asking price. Cool guitar, but the price is quite a reach. It will be interesting to watch and see what happens.

  9. #8

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    One of my favorite lines EVER from a film:

    Girl to guitar playing lover:

    "You like that thing more than me don't you." "No I've just known her longer."

    ~1:30

  10. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by D'Aquisto Fan
    Thanks for the link. Very cool. Some other fascinating and historically significant instruments for sale by Hank's Estate. Worth
    taking a look.
    Funny about the pricing. Out of the whole lot I would most desire the lowest priced item (L7) just because if its intrinsics.

  11. #10

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    Of course they'll sell for way less than asking prices, just ashame Hank isn't around to reap any reward.

  12. #11

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    Since this was just posted as a link and not the orginal seller I am breaking tradition and will comment that the price is very high. I looked at the price of all totalled and just think how many regular old D'angelico you could buy for the money. Granted they may not be Hank's guitar but that is a huge amount of cash. Hank was one of the most incredible players on the planet. I even talked to him once on the phone was very nice and that was cool. That said I just think the prices are way over the top. Crazy thing is if you are someone who is a billionaire it is just nothing.

    If fact imagine this scenario. Say there is a billionaire out in the world like Bezo's or Bloomberg, just name a name. Then imagine that this billionaire likes jazz guitar and archtops like I do. Well my fantasy is I just start buying every great archtop I see. That person could own all the D'angelico now in existence. They could pay $100,000 for each D'a in existence and only be out 100 million. My D'a is not for sale but for $100,000 I would have not choice.

    I did digress sorry.

  13. #12

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    Um well, the future owner of Garland's L-7C should be more concerned about its karma.

    "[...] he was an irascible character, prone to bouts of angry boozing, kept a jealeous eye on his wife (when his car crashed he was racing after her because he thought she'd taken the kids and left) […]"
    [from: WE NEED TO TALK ABOUT . . . HANK GARLAND: The forgotten star of the six string | Elsewhere by Graham Reid ]

    Nasty in Nashville?
    Billy Garland claims the crash was no accident, but an attempted killing by someone in the Nashville record scene [https://www.billboard.com/articles/n...k-garland-dies ].
    So what? The reason why not everyone is talking about Garland? All fakes or conceiled facts - history will tell abundantly clear!

    No one expects musicians to be pure angels, especially in the jazz genre - quite the opposite.
    I'd certainly like to play "the bass" of Charles Mingus, even Charlie Parker's King sax, but not so much Ben Webster's 1937 Selmer tenor sax #25418. Ben too was irascious, alcohol-addicted, boastful; according to his grand aunt Joyce Cockrell he had a "dual personality", and "could be violent and almost brutal".

  14. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by deacon Mark
    Since this was just posted as a link and not the orginal seller I am breaking tradition and will comment that the price is very high. I looked at the price of all totalled and just think how many regular old D'angelico you could buy for the money. Granted they may not be Hank's guitar but that is a huge amount of cash. Hank was one of the most incredible players on the planet. I even talked to him once on the phone was very nice and that was cool. That said I just think the prices are way over the top. Crazy thing is if you are someone who is a billionaire it is just nothing.

    If fact imagine this scenario. Say there is a billionaire out in the world like Bezo's or Bloomberg, just name a name. Then imagine that this billionaire likes jazz guitar and archtops like I do. Well my fantasy is I just start buying every great archtop I see. That person could own all the D'angelico now in existence. They could pay $100,000 for each D'a in existence and only be out 100 million. My D'a is not for sale but for $100,000 I would have not choice.

    I did digress sorry.
    Everything has a price. None of my three vintage D'Angelicos are for sale and probably will not be for sale in my lifetime as I do not need the money and I enjoy owning them. But truth be told, for 20K each, I would part with any of them.

  15. #14

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    I'm sure I'd've like to have that axe if I had that kind of dough laying around. Garland was a spectacular soloist whose name is often left out of "greatest guitarists" lists for some reason.

    here's the moment I realized:

  16. #15

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    I just looked at reverb.com, and the price is $175k. Is this a price drop, or was the OP just rounding up to "almost 200,000 dollars"? Anyway, asking a price and getting a price are two different things. As great as Garland was, and as cool as this guitar is, I doubt it'll sell for anywhere near this. As to whether there's a billionaire out there who might bid up the price -- alas, Paul Allen has gone to the great Guitar Auction in the sky.

    John

  17. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by John A.
    I just looked at reverb.com, and the price is $175k. Is this a price drop, or was the OP just rounding up to "almost 200,000 dollars"? Anyway, asking a price and getting a price are two different things. As great as Garland was, and as cool as this guitar is, I doubt it'll sell for anywhere near this. As to whether there's a billionaire out there who might bid up the price -- alas, Paul Allen has gone to the great Guitar Auction in the sky.

    John
    Sorta - I’m in the uk so it gave me a price in pound sterling. I guesstimated the price wrong. I’ll amend my original post for the sake of clarity.

    I did think for a second to put it in the for sale section but I’m not sure anyone would be buying this guitar with a view to taking it down to their local club date this weekend!

  18. #17

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    [QUOTE=Stringswinger;1009724]Everything has a price. None of my three vintage D'Angelicos are for sale and probably will not be for sale in my lifetime as I do not need the money and I enjoy owning them. But truth be told, for 20K each, I would part with any of them.[/QUOT

    SS that was a post I have to admit. Yes for sure everything has a price. Mine if you come to my house pay me in funds and take my 49 New Yorker the price is actually much less than $100K I mentioned, but in the mean time I am playing for all it worth.

  19. #18
    On the subject of the actual guitar itself, I love the very light sunburst on there - would that be a very faded Tobacco Sunburst finish?

    Some of things of note, Hank was using roundwounds, seemed to have a fairly high action and there’s some sorta padding underneath the pickguard to keep from rattling.

  20. #19

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    My first thought when looking at the photos and the description "The guitar is in incredible cosmetic shape with only the typical finish checking seen on a guitar this old [...]" was:
    Either this 1957er L-7C was finished with very thick layers
    (which usually translates to 'acoustically dead-sounding') to cause such deep tension cracks, or that statement "Like Hank's other guitars listed this guitar has been primarily kept in a climate controlled storage unit since Hank's accident in '61" is questionable.

  21. #20

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    Serious Greed! No one in the Jazz Genre is going to pay that asking price!

    This is not Rock and Roll and there are no museums nor Hard Rock Cafes to jump in here. What a waste of a great guitar and a great guitarist contribution!.

  22. #21

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ol' Fret
    Um well, the future owner of Garland's L-7C should be more concerned about its karma.

    "[...] he was an irascible character, prone to bouts of angry boozing, kept a jealeous eye on his wife (when his car crashed he was racing after her because he thought she'd taken the kids and left) […]"


    Gary Burton's recent Autobiography mentioned HG's car accident, and iirc included a mention of HG that day suddenly dropping everything and racing off to where he'd heard she was.....

    Sorry, I couldn't find my copy or I'd have looked for what GB actually said...HG brought GB to Nashville...they were close.......

  23. #22

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    Hank Garland was a fantastic guitar player. May he RIP. Period.

    However, sometimes, a guitar belongs to one particular player, as seems to be the case here. Hank Garland‘s story is a tragedy, at least after September 1961.
    Anyone who is also interested in the player's biography will have to ask themselves many questions, for which there are hardly any plausible explanations - which cries out for an own evaluation. Here is my personal one from a criminological-psychological-medical point of view. WARNING: Post may be too long-winding for micro-bloggers and f*c*book users, and/or too provocative for die-hard Hank Garland, or Elvis, etc., fans – so, in these cases, simply keep off!

    To name just a few of These questions (below some online references):

    1. How would a potential contract rifle killer, as told by Garland's brother Billy, know that Garland would abruptly speeding north to Wisconsin on that September day of 1961?

    "On the morning of September 8, 1961, he'd quarreled bitterly with wife Evelyn, who took their two children to a Nashville motel until Things calmed down. Arriving home, Garland found them gone and assumed she'd taken the kids back to her native Milwaukee and set out after her. Speeding north, around 5:00 PM, on Route 41 north of Springfield, Tennessee, his station wagon overturned, throwing Hank from the vehicle. He spent weeks in a coma."


    2. Why did that unknown truck driver bother to go to the hospital, but not to the police?

    "According to Billy Garland, a truck driver who claimed to witness the accident showed up at the hospital. He said that he'd seen a man carrying a rifle running along a ditch next to the highway after Garland's tire blew. [...]“


    3. The front passenger window fully broke (Garland threw through the windshield). Well, if they can spot a bullet hole in a broken windshield, they should also have found the holes in the tyre and the car top. A bullet hole in the side window would have fully broken that window (I don't think they used laminated or safety glass back then, at least not for side windows), and that "suspected area of the bully exit" looks a bit too small and not jagged. All in all, IMO, it looks like a later added retouching work.

    (move to 1:56 min)
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=32oGr4UgakA

    - "In a pile of Garland's things, Billy found a series of black-and-white 8-by-10 photographs of the Chevy Nomad. Taken at the junkyard, the pictures show tiny, jagged holes in Garland's car. There's one in the front passenger window. There's another in the roof of the car in the back. And there are some in the wheel well of the tire that blew. An investigator Billy hired in the late 1960s believed the photographs showed Garland's car had been fired upon.“


    4. Garland was a well-known, successful and quite respected white American guy, playing with renowned musicians and producers. Why should the police not consider the bullet holes in the car, and why should they care at all about some "Al Capones“ of the music industry?

    "Asked the name of the investigator, Billy says he doesn't remember. He no longer has a copy of the investigator's report. And he didn't take this information to the Nashville police. He says he didn't believe the police would investigate a crime that might involve Music industry bigwigs."


    5. There are blatant contradictions in the findings on medical discharges, and the number of subsequently applied electro-convulsive treatments is greatly exaggerated in some statements. Also, clear descriptions of PTSD symptoms at Garland.

    - "Garland emerged from the coma after three weeks, but he never completely recovered. When Vanderbilt Hospital released him on Nov. 18, his doctor noted he didn't have brain damage but seemed to suffer from 'organic post-traumatic psychosis."
    - "A hospital report contains the notation: ‘He has no memory now. He's retarded.‘ "
    - "Twelved days after his release, Evelyn dropped Garland off at Madison Sanitarium, a mental institution in Nashville, saying he was agitated, disoriented and hostile."
    - "Over the next six weeks, doctors administered 12 shock treatments and drugged the 31-year-old with Thorazine. On Jan. 14, 1962, a notation in his chart describes him as 'quite retarded'."


    6. Evelyn's observation was right that Thorazine made things worse. Exactly the same thing experienced Nellie, the wife of Thelonious Monk, who is said to really have loved her husband (maybe less in his last one or two years, when his disorder severly aggravated). There is some medical nonsense talk about an alleged inexplicable 'chemotherapy'.

    - "He was taking two Thorazine tablets three times a day, but Evelyn said they seemed to make things worse. Billy believes Garland acted paranoid because he knew someone was after him. Doctors again admitted Garland to Madison. This time, he received 100 milligrams of Thorazine four times a day, and inexplicably chemotherapy."
    - "https://books.google.de/books?id=Tz9xDQAAQBAJ&pg=PA267&lpg=PA267&dq=thelon ious+monk+thorazines&source=bl&ots=pr10hcEzT7&sig= ACfU3U2CEUVYOnzVO1CatFBA8ixTX9vxGQ&hl=de&sa=X&ved= 2ahUKEwjo-fLT_9vnAhVSQEEAHYoYCYcQ6AEwC3oECAsQAQ#v=onepage&q= thelonious%20monk%20thorazines & f = false "
    (scroll to p.267 f)



    The story, as told by Garland's brother, sounds not exactly credible, maybe even a little fishy for old ears. Billy Garland's effort could originally have been an unreflected idealization of his brother‘s person and work. Over time, he could well have become a victim of his own conspiracy theories and entrapments. There are countless similar cases in psychological literature.
    Hank Garland tragically fell victim to his own temper and jealousy. The consequences of a near fatal accident, the sudden fall from being a music star to the care case, the PTSD, and the later side effects of Chlorpromazine (Thorazine, the very first antipsychotic - still on the WHO Model List of Essential Medicines) - did the rest ... Of course, the marriage had been broken. It doesn‘t matter much if that happened or worsened before or after the accident.
    There is nothing to glorify, the old saying still applies: every silver lining has a cloud.
    As a man, I know about ruthless wars of the roses, which unscrupulous wives (or husbands) can spark. As a former doc on trauma units, I was familiar with severe (brain) injuries and their effects, including the frequently occurring PTSD, lasting disabilities, and the often extremely stressful long-term consequences of such a constellation for the families. I‘ll never forget the fate of a crashed jet fighter pilot and his nice family…
    The battle for royalties has always been fierce in the music industry, and by far not only colored musicians were concerned.
    Actually, it cannot be ruled out one hundred percent that this battle of Garland also contributed to the early end of his career. The famous quote by Hunter S. Thompson may not be original, but appropriate: “The music business is a cruel and shallow money trench, a long plastic hallway where thieves and pimps run free, and good men die like dogs.There's also a negative side.“

    - Article about Hank Garland | My Les Paul Forum
    (the most detailed description, IMO)
    - http://www.nashvillesound.net/garland.htm

    -
    Dave's Diary - 5/1/05 - Hank Garland RIP
    -
    Hank Garland Biography
    Last edited by Ol' Fret; 02-18-2020 at 10:29 PM.

  24. #23

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    Quote Originally Posted by mr quick
    I'm sure I'd've like to have that axe if I had that kind of dough laying around. Garland was a spectacular soloist whose name is often left out of "greatest guitarists" lists for some reason.

    here's the moment I realized:
    Jazz Winds From A New Direction', still holds up...I think Gary Burton was 18 or something ?

  25. #24

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    Quote Originally Posted by Marinero
    Thanks, Dot, for the great recording. I never heard Hank before and love his pristine, fat sound and the clarity of his voice. Beautiful playing and masterful technique. Good playing . . . Marinero
    The whole album's on YouTube



    Edit... wrong album but it's all good.

  26. #25

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    incedible story..if the story about the man seen with a rifle and pics taken of the car wreck...beggars belief....

  27. #26

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    Quote Originally Posted by dot75
    Jazz Winds From A New Direction', still holds up...I think Gary Burton was 18 or something ?
    I think 17. Pretty freaking amazing.

  28. #27

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    It surprises me that there are long-time guitar players who never heard of Hank Garland. But I suppose there are players I never heard of. To me, the most amazing thing about "Jazz Winds From A New Direction" is Gary Burton. To be able to play like that at 17 is simply incredible, a true prodigy. The entire group is world-class, though.

  29. #28

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    Quote Originally Posted by Marinero
    Thanks, Dot, for the great recording. I never heard Hank before and love his pristine, fat sound and the clarity of his voice. Beautiful playing and masterful technique. Good playing . . . Marinero
    Oh my, how is that even possible?
    Being a guitar player for so long as you say you've been he's hard to have been missed especially since he played on countless famous country recordings and was equally proficient in jazz..but better late than never, glad you finally found him...
    Last edited by wintermoon; 02-20-2020 at 01:30 AM.

  30. #29

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    Many guitar recordings over the years do get a bit old and I don't listen to them much any more. In the case of Hank I still go back and listen to Jazz Winds it just never seems to get old. One aspect of his playing is the really nice comping he does behind the soloist. He just makes those nice inside moves. In fact reminds of the my old teacher and friend Freddie Rundquist. Fred knew Hank well and I believe at one point he may have gotten a Stromberg guitar from Hank. In any case Fred was too a master comping guitarist and seems he and Hank sound similar in there approach.

    Ok now I am going to get out my guitar this afternoon and maybe try Sugarfoot Rag. I have never really tried to play it or learn it but just for some ear work I am going to give it a wing. My sight reading is fine so I will not be tempted to read the lines, I am going to just ear the puppy because I am pretty sure Hank eared almost anything fast.

    Maybe they could loan me the L7 just to keep it from getting too stiff.

  31. #30

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    To y Williams was only 17 in the famous Miles Davis Quintet!

  32. #31

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    What's up with the three screws on the top between the pickup and the bridge?

    Does the L7C have a center block that glue just couldn't hold onto, or unusual pickup mount / adjust or?

  33. #32

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    Those screws hold the pickup in place. Google "charlie christian pickup".

  34. #33

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    Quote Originally Posted by wintermoon
    Oh my, how is that even possible?
    Being a guitar player for so long as you say you've been he's hard to have been missed especially since he played on countless famous country recordings and was equally proficient in jazz..but better late than never, glad you finally found him...
    Hi, WM,
    Well, my favorite musicians were never Jazz guitarists. Being a multi-instrumentalist: former sax/flute player as well as Classical, R&B, and Jazz guitar, I usually listened to sax/trumpet players since I learned more from them about melody, phrasing, pacing, etc. than I did from guitarists. However, my guitar education was much more eclectic than most Jazzers: Phil Upchurch, Gilberto, Jobim, Paco de Lucia, Roland Dyens, Narcisso Yepes, the Assad Brothers, Segovia, and yes, of course, Wes--who was my first influence for Jazz guitar. I am also am heavily influenced by R&B guitarists--most of whom were anonymous players on thousands of recordings during the 60's and 70's. So, I did miss Hank among the hundreds of musicians I followed over the years--yes, but better late than never! Here's the master Roland Dyens playing Dizzy's "Night in Tunisia." What do you think?



  35. #34

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    That L7 with the CC pick-up is just so luscious - but not the price of a Ferrari luscious.
    If it was Lenny Schmuck's L7 what would it be worth, $20K? I'm not an expert - that's not a rhetorical question.

    Hank was a great player but aside from a few nerdy guitar jazzbos and educated country fans, few have heard of him.

  36. #35

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    I first knew of him when I read up on the Byrdland guitar before I could play much of anything. I think even non-jazzers like that model, so he should be fairly well known - and he deserves it; impressive playing.

  37. #36

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    Quote Originally Posted by DRS
    That L7 with the CC pick-up is just so luscious - but not the price of a Ferrari luscious.
    Funny about our priorities. I just heard a car ad on the radio today, "Ever dreamed about owning a Mercedes....?"

    Nope, not for one minute. But a fabulous archtop, yes!