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  1. #1

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    Here's a video take of "Ornithology" on a beautiful blonde ES 350 from 1952 that "The Guitar Company" let me test drive for a week.

    DB


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    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #2

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    Nothing wrong with that, is there? Fine guitar, fine player. That's all we need to feel life is worth living.

  4. #3

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    Took me a second attempt to click on the link and listen because listening to you sometimes makes me think of giving up.....

    Nice playing and that guitar sounds great!

  5. #4

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    I'm impressed by the fact that you never seem to need to make a big jump. The notes always seem to be right under your fingers. Joe Pass is the other guitarist that I always notice that about. I always seem to be in the wrong place on the fingerboard. I admire players who master the potential of the position they are playing in.

  6. #5

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    I have always loved the late 40s/early 50s ES-350. Tremendous guitar.

  7. #6

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    DB, awesome playing. I had the opportunity to buy one of those for ~$900 back around 1980 but didn't. But an older student of mine who could barely play bought it instead. It was the 4-knob blonde version.

  8. #7

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    What do the knobs do? Doubt I’ll ever see one in person.

  9. #8

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    • Guitar company In Holland neemt 17% van het totaal voor gitaren tussen de €3500,- en meer..!!

      emilP
    Last edited by emilP; 01-30-2020 at 08:17 AM.

  10. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by TedBPhx
    What do the knobs do? Doubt I’ll ever see one in person.
    I believe it's V-V-T. No selector switch until the 4-knob version.

  11. #10

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    I have always coveted a 3 knob 350. Very tasty playing Dick !

  12. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by lawson-stone
    I'm impressed by the fact that you never seem to need to make a big jump. The notes always seem to be right under your fingers. Joe Pass is the other guitarist that I always notice that about. I always seem to be in the wrong place on the fingerboard. I admire players who master the potential of the position they are playing in.
    Thanks Lawson. I guess what you see is the result of many hours of playing and knowing the tunes well. I play my lines all over the fretboard. That was not the case when I started out. I was more a position player then. I remember having to "read" chord symbols to play my lines over many years ago. That still happens, but only if I do not know the tune well. When improvising there should be as little cognitive effort as possible. Thinking is for studying, not for playing. Big jumps on the fretboard simply require too much thought ... Also, lines connect better when they are not far apart IMHO.

    DB