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  1. #101

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    Quote Originally Posted by Max405
    I PRAY Mark says this to me one day soon..
    He will don’t worry......your in good hands.

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    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #102

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    Quote Originally Posted by neatomic
    i assume that this would be just the thread to ask mr. campellone about his background...i'd assume he comes from a line of woodworkers and maybe even instrument makers...that kind of eye & understanding is difficult to learn otherwise...not impossible! but...

    cheers
    Well, no instrument makers among my ancestry - all my grandparents came from small villages in southern Italy - don't know details about my mom's family, but my dad's family owned some land which included olive groves and vineyards, where they raised some animals and produced olive oil and wine - as mentioned in my bio, though, there was a lot of artistic talent in my mom's immediate family - all three of her brothers were excellent craftsmen - I recall as a kid being impressed by how much pride they took in doing fine quality work - I guess that set a standard for me, and I've always tried to achieve that same fine quality in my work -
    Last edited by MCampellone; 02-16-2020 at 04:50 PM.

  4. #103

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    Quote Originally Posted by wintermoon
    Joe,
    He'll give his reasoning, but in my mind that's the safest place.
    The original electric guitars, the Gibson ES-150 and 250 had t.p. jacks and you've probably never seen a cracked side on one of those as a result.
    I have no idea why they switched to rim mounted jacks save for saving a little money as the originals used more hardware.
    But there are countless side mounted jacks that have cracked and frequently shattered rims. How many times have we seen an otherwise beautiful guitar w a huge plate covering an ugly crack...many!

    I'm gonna disagree w NA about this, there's no discernable change in tone imo and almost zero chance of rim cracking and I see no bother!
    For acoustic archtops with floating pickup, you obviously want to have no mounted components which would impede the body's vibration, so mounting the jack in the end-block (where there is minimal vibration) makes the most sense - but for archtops with body mounted pickups and controls, the response of the top is already significantly altered, so jack location is a relative non-issue in terms of how it might affect tonal quality - it is important, though, that rim mounted jacks have internal reinforcement to avoid a rim crack situation.

  5. #104
    Maestro Campellone, i admire very much your work. Sadly in my country (argentina) there isnt a single chance to hear or play your instruments. I recently played in Tokyo an standard model (24,75 scale and floating pickup) in a guitar store and i was amazed by the quality of that guitar.
    Regarding your comments about the top vibration altered by set pickups, knobs, etc... I would like to ask you specifically about amplified tone. (I chase the L-5 Wesmo tone and very big dynamic range, i dont like two set pickups versions of L-5 and laminated wood guitars because they dont have that dynamic response, and sadly i need at least a 3/4 nut width).

    Is a good acoustic instrument a good electric one? Some top vibration should be avoided? A thicker top is desirable? The positions of tone and volume knobs contributes to that amazing sound?
    I play a kind of music in which i need more dynamic response than traditional jazz and the difference between the two pickups L-5 version and the one pickup L-5 are very big.
    Thank you very much!


    Enviado desde mi LG-H870 mediante Tapatalk

  6. #105
    Quote Originally Posted by MCampellone
    For acoustic archtops with floating pickup, you obviously want to have no mounted components which would impede the body's vibration, so mounting the jack in the end-block (where there is minimal vibration) makes the most sense - but for archtops with body mounted pickups and controls, the response of the top is already significantly altered, so jack location is a relative non-issue in terms of how it might affect tonal quality - it is important, though, that rim mounted jacks have internal reinforcement to avoid a rim crack situation.
    That was the refered message above.
    Thanks

    Enviado desde mi LG-H870 mediante Tapatalk

  7. #106

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    Quote Originally Posted by MCampellone
    Well, no instrument makers among my ancestry - all my grandparents came from small villages in southern Italy - don't know details about my mom's family, but my dad's family owned some land which included olive groves and vineyards, where they raised some animals and produced olive oil and wine - as mentioned in my bio, though, there was much artistic ability in my mom's family - all three of her brothers were excellent craftsmen - I recall as a kid being impressed by how much pride they took in doing fine quality work - I guess that set a standard for me, and I've always tried to achieve that same fine quality in my work -
    thanks for your thoughtful response!!

    and rest easy, you have achieved that fine quality!!!

    continued success

    cheers

  8. #107

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gustavo Eiriz

    Maestro Campellone, i admire very much your work. Sadly in my country (argentina) there isnt a single chance to hear or play your instruments. I recently played in Tokyo an standard model (24,75 scale and floating pickup) in a guitar store and i was amazed by the quality of that guitar.

    Enviado desde mi LG-H870 mediante Tapatalk
    Well, GE, don't feel too bad - you've played one more than I ever have and I'm 10,000 miles closer ! But that hasn't stopped me - - I finally ordered one anyway.
    I can safely say if ever there were a guitar ordering experience where you wouldn't need a pre- purchase trial, buying from Mark C is one of them.

    Dennis

  9. #108

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    Quote Originally Posted by MCampellone
    For acoustic archtops with floating pickup, you obviously want to have no mounted components which would impede the body's vibration, so mounting the jack in the end-block (where there is minimal vibration) makes the most sense - but for archtops with body mounted pickups and controls, the response of the top is already significantly altered, so jack location is a relative non-issue in terms of how it might affect tonal quality - it is important, though, that rim mounted jacks have internal reinforcement to avoid a rim crack situation.

    Mark,

    While I'm not a luthier, common sense absolutely supports what you say. A carved top that's anchored with two mounted pickups, a pickguard resting on the pickup bezels, a toggle switch, and four knobs (maybe even a Bigsby!), is not going to have frequency nuance like an acoustic. It is now an electric guitar that may happen to be adequate acoustically for practice. There's nothing wrong with that type of guitar and a lot right, but don't waste your money trying to get that type of a guitar tap tuned.

    I have a couple of guitars that try to split the difference. Two have a single mounted pickup, one with pots on the top and one with pots on the pickguard. Another is a Gibson Howard Roberts with a suspended pickup, an oval hole, mounted pots and laminated wood. They amplify very well and are okay acoustically but not great. There is a lot of workmanship in those guitars. Nonetheless I put them in the electric guitar category.

  10. #109
    Quote Originally Posted by Dennis D
    Well, GE, don't feel too bad - you've played one more than I ever have and I'm 10,000 miles closer ! But that hasn't stopped me - - I finally ordered one anyway.
    I can safely say if ever there were a guitar ordering experience where you wouldn't need a pre- purchase trial, buying from Mark C is one of them.

    Dennis
    Agreed. Unfortunately I was Gibson blind almost my entire life. I wish I jumped on the Campy Train 20 years ago. Also if I was 10 years younger I would have a Campellone Cameo on order. A Citation at less than half the price and probably better quality. I have 9 Gibson archtops. Not 1 of them has the build quality of my Campellone. Don’t get me wrong I love my Gibson’s but the build quality of my Campellone is better. I have 3 L5 Wesmo’s and my Campellone sounds better IMO. Steve (QAman) was correct. A Campellone sounds like a really good 1960’s L5. Mine has a set humbucker and it is still a acoustic cannon. I was playing it unplugged one day and my wife told me to turn it down she was trying to watch tv.
    I wish I took Steve’s advice sooner but like I said Gibson blind. Not saying I don’t love Gibson but if you want the ultimate L5 experience and can live without a G on the headstock go with that C on the headstock. It is a G on steroids.
    I am the new poster boy for the Campellone Guitar Co. We need to do some photoshop work on my Mr.Magoo face though. Thank God for the digital world.

  11. #110

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    Vinny - I was having lunch with my wife yesterday at our favorite Italian restaurant and telling her about your build. She remembers Mark from the early Five Towns shows and always admired his work and thought he was a very kind accommodating builder- which turned out to be true.

    As I was explaining his current models - I showed her pics of the Cameo and she said it was stunning . Her next words were” so are you thinking about ordering one “ - of which I replied “ not sure.

    But you are right - it’s an equivalent to a Citation - and becoming very tempting. Mark has only made 3, with a pending 4th.

    She also feels your blonde would look cool in an aged blonde ( straw color) like an old Gibson - with an aged clear coat over the binding.

    She has supported my guitar hobby for 30 plus years - and spent many hours with me In Jimmy D’Aquisto and John Monteleone’s shop.

    So happy for your build and the excitement surrounding Mark Campellone’s offerings.
    Last edited by QAman; 02-17-2020 at 05:48 PM.

  12. #111

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    Do not let that woman get away.

  13. #112

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    qamans in good company...jim halls wife bought him his first d'aquisto..and was behind the "no binding" look of his later classic d'aquisto arch!


    cheers

  14. #113

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    Over 40 years ago my new wife, for our first Christmas, presented me with a Martin D28 (I was a folksinger at the time). Amazing woman, we just celebrated our 42nd anniversary.

  15. #114

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    Quote Originally Posted by lawson-stone
    Over 40 years ago my new wife, for our first Christmas, presented me with a Martin D28 (I was a folksinger at the time). Amazing woman, we just celebrated our 42nd anniversary.
    Its great seeing you guys speak highly of your wives. That's a good way to be. We are lucky to feel that way.
    I am lucky too. Blessed.
    JD

  16. #115

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    My wife and I have been married for coming up on 45 years. She begrudges every penny spent on herself, but doesn't complain at all about what I spend, so I try to limit that. I don't plan on letting her go anywhere either.

  17. #116

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    My wife can play the piano quite well (passed grade 8 piano exam when she was at school), she likes playing baroque pieces a lot. We have a good Kemble-Yamaha upright piano in our living room so she often sits down and just plays whatever is on the stand. Currently she is playing some Rameau (La Villageoise).

    So I get a lot of little piano recitals all day, it’s very nice for a music-lover!

  18. #117
    My wife plays the cast iron frying pan. B flat when it hits my head.....LOL

  19. #118

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    My wife cannot play "Three Blind Mice", but I didn't marry her for her musical ability. She does pretty well with a frying pan, though, but keeps it on the stove. Her greatest fear in life seems to be that I could starve, so she keeps putting massive amounts of food in front of me. As long as I keep her, I'll be assured of having plenty to eat.

  20. #119

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    Quote Originally Posted by vinnyv1k
    My wife plays the cast iron frying pan. B flat when it hits my head.....LOL

  21. #120

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gustavo Eiriz
    Maestro Campellone, i admire very much your work. Sadly in my country (argentina) there isnt a single chance to hear or play your instruments. I recently played in Tokyo an standard model (24,75 scale and floating pickup) in a guitar store and i was amazed by the quality of that guitar.
    Regarding your comments about the top vibration altered by set pickups, knobs, etc... I would like to ask you specifically about amplified tone. (I chase the L-5 Wesmo tone and very big dynamic range, i dont like two set pickups versions of L-5 and laminated wood guitars because they dont have that dynamic response, and sadly i need at least a 3/4 nut width).

    Is a good acoustic instrument a good electric one? Some top vibration should be avoided? A thicker top is desirable? The positions of tone and volume knobs contributes to that amazing sound?
    I play a kind of music in which i need more dynamic response than traditional jazz and the difference between the two pickups L-5 version and the one pickup L-5 are very big.
    Thank you very much!


    Enviado desde mi LG-H870 mediante Tapatalk
    Hi Gustavo - I'm glad you've had a chance to play one of my guitars and I thank you for your kind comments.

    To answer your questions, I know I've mentioned this before, but it's probably worth repeating - the archtop guitar was originally designed as an acoustic instrument, before pickups were even invented, and there are qualities in a good acoustic instrument that will create problems if you amplify it with a pickup. A guitar that is very responsive acoustically will usually have very uneven response when amplified, with lots of "hot spots" and "dead spots" in certain ranges. Building the guitar more heavily (with a thicker top and back) will of course inhibit acoustic response, but it will usually help to even out the response when amplified, so you'll get more even sustain throughout the instrument's range, with less hot/dead spot intensity. Having the pickup and controls mounted to the top will also inhibit its vibration, though I don't think that the particular positioning of the controls is much of an issue. Also worth mentioning, I've found that even with built-in pickup and controls, a solid carved wood archtop will have slightly greater dynamic range than one with laminated top and back construction, and many players prefer the attenuated response of laminated archtops for amplified performance.

  22. #121

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    Quote Originally Posted by Marty Grass
    Mark,

    While I'm not a luthier, common sense absolutely supports what you say. A carved top that's anchored with two mounted pickups, a pickguard resting on the pickup bezels, a toggle switch, and four knobs (maybe even a Bigsby!), is not going to have frequency nuance like an acoustic. It is now an electric guitar that may happen to be adequate acoustically for practice. There's nothing wrong with that type of guitar and a lot right, but don't waste your money trying to get that type of a guitar tap tuned.

    I have a couple of guitars that try to split the difference. Two have a single mounted pickup, one with pots on the top and one with pots on the pickguard. Another is a Gibson Howard Roberts with a suspended pickup, an oval hole, mounted pots and laminated wood. They amplify very well and are okay acoustically but not great. There is a lot of workmanship in those guitars. Nonetheless I put them in the electric guitar category.
    Amen, Marty - the minute you start screwing pickups and controls onto the top, it's not an acoustic guitar anymore : )

  23. #122

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    Quote Originally Posted by Max405
    I PRAY Mark says this to me one day soon..
    It'll happen Joe : )

  24. #123

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    Quote Originally Posted by Patlotch
    after all, don't guitars have feminine forms? I can see that some dream of a woman with guitar shapes. I dare not push the metaphor to sexual considerations. And then there, it's all about possession. It is true that saying 'my wife' or 'my guitar' is not much different

    We should open a topic: Woman in your possession the longest
    Hmmm...kinda begs the question, what's better - one guitar and many wives, or one wife and many guitars? I'd go with the latter : )

  25. #124

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    If anyone's interested in the other side's point of view: forget about husbands and their meals; get a hand-built archtop and go live in Patagonia.

  26. #125

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    Zina, my wife feeds me because she loves me, not because I demand it. We both care for the other more than we care for ourselves. I know that isn't always the case in a marriage, perhaps it isn't in most. I don't know, because my sample size is only one, and I do not pry into other marriages. Living alone with a guitar is not an attractive thought to me. I could bear to live without a guitar, but not without my wife. Perhaps someday you will find a man you love more than guitars. Or perhaps not. I believe the former would be better than the latter, as long as he loved you the same.

  27. #126

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    Mrs.k and I just celebrated our 52nd Anniversary. All my tools of the trade were approved, and in many cases insisted upon, by my infinitely better half. I am blessed.
    Last edited by citizenk74; 02-18-2020 at 10:06 PM. Reason: There is a U in "our"

  28. #127

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    Quote Originally Posted by sgosnell
    Zina, my wife feeds me because she loves me, not because I demand it. We both care for the other more than we care for ourselves. I know that isn't always the case in a marriage, perhaps it isn't in most. I don't know, because my sample size is only one, and I do not pry into other marriages. Living alone with a guitar is not an attractive thought to me. I could bear to live without a guitar, but not without my wife. Perhaps someday you will find a man you love more than guitars. Or perhaps not. I believe the former would be better than the latter, as long as he loved you the same.
    Yes, you're right, and that's nicely put; thank you. I was being a little flippant, because I often see guitarists write about unfriendly wives who complain. My parents loved each other very much, so I have had a good example of the contrary; just like you said. In the meantime though, it's too early for a husband, so I'm still choosing the archtop, but I'll strike Patagonia!

  29. #128
    Quote Originally Posted by Zina
    Yes, you're right, and that's nicely put; thank you. I was being a little flippant, because I often see guitarists write about unfriendly wives who complain. My parents loved each other very much, so I have had a good example of the contrary; just like you said. In the meantime though, it's too early for a husband, so I'm still choosing the archtop, but I'll strike Patagonia!
    Well, my friend who bought my L-5 Ces lives in Patagonia. It is a beautyfull place, i have been there many times but i like the cities, car crashes and computers and guitar shops, and fast food places.
    By the way, he is very happy and does have a channel on youtube where he uses his *ex-mine* guitar for jazz tutorials:

  30. #129
    Quote Originally Posted by MCampellone
    Hi Gustavo - I'm glad you've had a chance to play one of my guitars and I thank you for your kind comments.

    To answer your questions, I know I've mentioned this before, but it's probably worth repeating - the archtop guitar was originally designed as an acoustic instrument, before pickups were even invented, and there are qualities in a good acoustic instrument that will create problems if you amplify it with a pickup. A guitar that is very responsive acoustically will usually have very uneven response when amplified, with lots of "hot spots" and "dead spots" in certain ranges. Building the guitar more heavily (with a thicker top and back) will of course inhibit acoustic response, but it will usually help to even out the response when amplified, so you'll get more even sustain throughout the instrument's range, with less hot/dead spot intensity. Having the pickup and controls mounted to the top will also inhibit its vibration, though I don't think that the particular positioning of the controls is much of an issue. Also worth mentioning, I've found that even with built-in pickup and controls, a solid carved wood archtop will have slightly greater dynamic range than one with laminated top and back construction, and many players prefer the attenuated response of laminated archtops for amplified performance.
    Mark, thank you for answering to my question!!! The conjuntion of a built-in pickup and a carved wood makes a magic which is very difficult to understand to me... inspires me in a way in which a dead sounding laminated in no way does it.
    Vinny, i have been also a Gibson blind, but as much as you I changed my mind.
    Kind regards.

  31. #130

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    Quote Originally Posted by sgosnell
    Zina, my wife feeds me because she loves me, not because I demand it. We both care for the other more than we care for ourselves. I know that isn't always the case in a marriage, perhaps it isn't in most. I don't know, because my sample size is only one, and I do not pry into other marriages. Living alone with a guitar is not an attractive thought to me. I could bear to live without a guitar, but not without my wife. Perhaps someday you will find a man you love more than guitars. Or perhaps not. I believe the former would be better than the latter, as long as he loved you the same.
    Sir I have always appreciated your contribution on this forum. With this, you have joined the elite in my thinking. I too am married to a woman with whom I have been able to utterly lose myself, and she with me. We try to serve each other and advance each other in life, we gave up on calculating relative sacrifices many years ago and decided that we each owe so much to the other it's likely best not to know. To be sure, I'd miss my guitars, but I would let them all go forever in a moment if it meant losing her.

    I think Dizzy Gillespie once referred to Charlie Parker as "the other half of my heartbeat."

    That really is how I see my wife, and how she sees me. Just between us, I still claim I come out ahead in the Grand Bargain. I also sincerely wish for every person the kind of real life, tears and sweat, diapers and late nights, partnership that I've enjoyed these 42 years.

  32. #131
    Sweet The new CAMPELLONE V1K model begins-940511f7-e121-46ef-b4e3-f2618dd3fbfc-jpg

  33. #132
    Quote Originally Posted by citizenk74
    Mrs.k and I just celebrated our 52nd Anniversary. All my tools of the trade were approved, and in many cases insisted upon, by my infinitely better half. I am blessed.
    .

    I think Mrs.k is a very lucky woman also. Mr.k is one of the nicest on the forum.

  34. #133

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    Quote Originally Posted by lawson-stone
    Sir I have always appreciated your contribution on this forum. With this, you have joined the elite in my thinking. I too am married to a woman with whom I have been able to utterly lose myself, and she with me. We try to serve each other and advance each other in life, we gave up on calculating relative sacrifices many years ago and decided that we each owe so much to the other it's likely best not to know. To be sure, I'd miss my guitars, but I would let them all go forever in a moment if it meant losing her.

    I think Dizzy Gillespie once referred to Charlie Parker as "the other half of my heartbeat."

    That really is how I see my wife, and how she sees me. Just between us, I still claim I come out ahead in the Grand Bargain. I also sincerely wish for every person the kind of real life, tears and sweat, diapers and late nights, partnership that I've enjoyed these 42 years.
    Beautiful Lawson, just beautiful. And sgosnell's post was as well.

    Count me among the "many guitars, one wife" group who would lose all of the guitars before the wife.

    I have 15 guitars and have owned about 85 others.

    I have one wife but have been intimate with over 50 other women prior to settling down with my better half (and that is no Wilt Chamberlain exaggeration/BS).

    I do think (for most of us) a variety of guitars/partners is necessary along the way to finding the right one (or the right many). After all, whether it is guitars or life partners, how can you know what you like until you have laid hands on a few?

  35. #134

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    Quote Originally Posted by vinnyv1k
    Sweet The new CAMPELLONE V1K model begins-940511f7-e121-46ef-b4e3-f2618dd3fbfc-jpg
    Bro, If I was a really small living thing, I would love to live inside of your guitar.. Its like a palace in there.
    JD

  36. #135

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    Quote Originally Posted by lawson-stone
    That really is how I see my wife, and how she sees me. Just between us, I still claim I come out ahead in the Grand Bargain. I also sincerely wish for every person the kind of real life, tears and sweat, diapers and late nights, partnership that I've enjoyed these 42 years.
    Beautifully said Lawson.

    From 1970, until I retired in 1995, I was an air-traffic-controller in the New York metro area. The first time I saw my wife Cynthia, who was also an air-traffic-controller, I knew that one day she and I would marry. A short while later we did, and I also came out ahead in our partnership. After a few years, I attended Law School which meant that for four nights a week for four years I was hardly ever at home. Hence, most of our family responsibilities rested on her shoulders along with the major challenge of raising our four daughters without much help from me.

    Over the years a steady stream of guitars and amplifiers came in the door with nary a complaint from Cynthia. For a number of years we've been empty nesters with the concomitant vacant bedrooms. One is the "guitar room" the other is my wife's backup clothes closet. I'd like to think that this was the first 50-50 split we ever wound up making since we each got a room. But then I remembered our cellar and the train layout--ostensibly for our grandchildren--the driveway with "our" Mustang GT 500, and a few other things and realized I was way ahead again.

    One more thing. Two years ago I had prostate surgery. A few months ago sepsis and pneumonia-both involved weeks of convalesce. I had the best nurse you could ever ask for.

    No partnership is ever a 50-50 split--one person will always wind up contributing more then the other. The wisest decision I ever made was marrying my beautiful loving wife Cynthia.

    Tony D.

  37. #136

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    Quote Originally Posted by Max405
    Bro, If I was a really small living thing, I would love to live inside of your guitar.. Its like a palace in there.
    JD

    hahaha..i thought the exact same thing!!!

    cheers

    ps- i knew this was gonna be a great thread...said it right off ^... not only seeing the build in progress, but all the other beautiful tributes & revelations besides!!! well done all around

  38. #137

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    Mark is a very good egg.
    I owned a Deluxe about ten years ago, realized the quality of Mark's guitars, and then asked him to build me an 18" blonde, non cut in 2012. I'm still enjoying it and I still remember the day it arrived at my home.
    It was a humid, wet day in the Carolinas and the UPS dude left it beside my home. I took the box into the garage and opened it quickly. I ordered a gator skin Cedar Creek case with it, too. Brown.
    Eight years later the blonde has turned golden and the binding has yellowed a little. There is some checking on it and it sounds wonderful. The wood has dried sufficiently so that there is now a reverb to the higher register of notes.
    I have a Gibson S400 and it's excellent, too. But the Campy is special. It was made for me. Mark took the time to send me pics along the build process.
    He made life happy for me then.
    Thanks, Mark.

  39. #138
    The V1K Model The new CAMPELLONE V1K model begins-a5f7c816-634b-4428-a4f1-70a9aae01a61-jpgThe new CAMPELLONE V1K model begins-3d65e90f-fb28-4dad-a1f3-1c5ddf3b3126-jpg

  40. #139
    side note : v1k is my technical code at work. Vinny my name. Hence how I came up with my handle here.

  41. #140

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    That’s beautiful Vin. Maybe Mark could put a light in there?
    JD

  42. #141

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    Quote Originally Posted by vinnyv1k
    The V1K Model
    Cool. What makes it a V1K Model? Inquiring minds need to know.

  43. #142

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hammertone
    Cool. What makes it a V1K Model? Inquiring minds need to know.
    ..I'm betting even the interior label will have m.o.p. inlays and will somehow glow ............

    ......Just kidding Vinny, honest ! It looks gorgeous !
    Last edited by Dennis D; 02-20-2020 at 11:41 PM.

  44. #143

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    Gorgeous!

  45. #144
    V1K model = a mixture of a Standard, Deluxe, and a Special with special diamond fretboard inlays ( Mark’s idea ).
    17x3x25x1-11/16. Built in humbucker. Thick top. Blonde.
    Last edited by vinnyv1k; 02-21-2020 at 12:11 PM.

  46. #145

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    Quote Originally Posted by vinnyv1k
    V1K model = a mixture of a Standard, Deluxe, and a Special with special diamond fretboard inlays ( Mark’s idea ).
    17x3x25x1-1/16. Built in humbucker. Thick top. Blonde.
    Love the vagueness!
    Which Standard, Deluxe, and Special feechures, or will he just, you know, surprise you?

  47. #146

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    Quote Originally Posted by Max405
    That’s beautiful Vin. Maybe Mark could put a light in there?
    JD
    What he needs is a full-blown lightshow embedded in the fretboard, confetti shooting out of the f-holes after a really good solo, a drinks tray that folds out of the tailpiece, and a siren that goes off when he starts "Feelings".

  48. #147

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    Quote Originally Posted by vinnyv1k
    V1K model = a mixture of a Standard, Deluxe, and a Special with special diamond fretboard inlays ( Mark’s idea ).
    17x3x25x1-1/16. Built in humbucker. Thick top. Blonde.
    It was either the V1K, or the Jane Mansfield.
    I like the V1K!

  49. #148

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    It’s coming along nice Vinny - thanks for sharing pics of the build.

  50. #149
    Quote Originally Posted by Hammertone
    Love the vagueness!
    Which Standard, Deluxe, and Special feechures, or will he just, you know, surprise you?
    It was well planned out with Mark coming up with the final touch.
    Stay tuned and you will see it unfold.
    So far you have seen Deluxe F-holes. The binding will be Standard single ply.
    I am actually more excited this time than my Special as now I know how good it is going to be. This will be my Swan Song guitar. My last.

    For me the builder / customer relationship becomes almost better than the guitar it shelf. I gained a great love for Jimmy D’Aquisto many years ago. I feel the exact same love and respect for Mark Campellone now. A special bond happens that can never happen buying a production guitar. The guitar becomes way more special also. For me now I enjoy playing my Campellone more than my Gibson’s.
    That is a huge statement coming from me. Everyone knows I am a HUGE Gibson boy.

  51. #150

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    Quote Originally Posted by Max405
    It was either the V1K, or the Jane Mansfield.
    I like the V1K!
    Jayne Mansfield, please.
    Classic Curbside Classic: 1967 Buick Electra 225 Convertible – The Jayne Mansfield Of Cars

    But I prefer "The Dagmar." Virginia Ruth Egnor started something ... big.
    Mileposts in Design: Cadillac’s “Dagmars” – An Intimate Look At Their Origins, Development and Namesake