Reply to Thread Bookmark Thread
Posts 1 to 13 of 13
  1. #1

    User Info Menu

    For decades, the guitar pick has constantly slipped from my fingers. Finally discovered something that works -- poster putty! While it needs to be changed occasionally since it gets dirty, it provides just enough adhesion to keep the pick from slipping, yet I can easily disconnect from it. This is my 3.5 mm stone pick!

    Guitar Pick Slippage Solved-selection_893-jpg

    Mark

  2.  

    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #2

    User Info Menu

    Interesting and inexpensive solution which would work with any pick.

    For me, going to a smaller pick eliminated pick slippage. With a small teardrop or jazz III size pick, I can feel the forward or top edge of the pick respectively between my fingers and immediately know the orientation and position of the pick. With the standard Fender shaped pick (351), I had problems with slipping. I think that was because there was no tactile cue as to position.

    I use one of three picks- D'Andrea ProPlec small teardrop (358), larger D'Andrea pick (651) cut down to the Dunlop Jazz III shape, and the Dunlop Ultex Jazz III if I want a brighter tone. While the ProPlecs are smooth, they do not slip around between my fingers in these smaller sizes. The Ultex has raised letters as well.

  4. #3

    User Info Menu

    I have some Blue Chip picks, and it can be difficult to move the pick deliberately. The material the pick is made of seems to have built-in lubrication for sliding across the strings, but it sticks to my fingers so that I can remove my finger or thumb and the pick remains stuck to the remaining finger even if it's underneath the finger. It won't fall off. I can't do that with most other picks.

  5. #4

    User Info Menu

    I find after so many decades of playing them, the Fender heavy pick is the only one I can really use on stage - it’s big enough to really hold on to and if it slips (or I grind a tip playing hard) I just rotate a touch more to the next tip. Other picks I try just don’t stay in place for me.


  6. #5

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by neilspeers
    I find after so many decades of playing them, the Fender heavy pick is the only one I can really use on stage - it’s big enough to really hold on to and if it slips (or I grind a tip playing hard) I just rotate a touch more to the next tip. Other picks I try just don’t stay in place for me.

    Is that a pick for bass guitar? Excuse my ignorance..

  7. #6

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by p1p
    Is that a pick for bass guitar? Excuse my ignorance..
    Nope, just a big pick that I prefer to use on stage. They certainly work for bass though.

    I have more ‘regular’ picks for sitting around the hose and some oddball ones like wooden or super thick or super pointy.


  8. #7

    User Info Menu

    Isn't it interesting how there are so many different preferences for many aspects of playing guitar? Most people hands are pretty similar in size and function- humans are fairly standardized physically- yet we have a lot of different experiences in what "works" for each of us.

    I'm 6'3" and have proportionally sized hands, yet I prefer a small teardrop plectrum. Someone else may prefer a large pick. Pat Metheny plays with a light 351 Fender pick that he turns and uses the shoulder. Jerry Garcia liked a 2 mm thick Adamas graphite pick; Bob Weir likes the Dunlop red Jazz II with the rounded tip. Some like 5 mm thick gyspy jazz picks, some like stone picks. I have a stainless steel 351 sized pick with a pointy tip that I've had for 35 years, but rarely use it because it sounds bad and chews the heck out of the strings- a failed experiment. And some people prefer no pick at all!

    I just ordered a pack of Fender 347 heavies, since I've never tried those and this thread got me thinking about it.

  9. #8

    User Info Menu

    I do something with my picks I haven't seen anybody else do--like Cunamara above, I'm a big guy with big hands and I prefer a small teardrop (Fender Extra Heavy) but I use it upside down...and to solve a lifelong issue of dropping the pick, I paint the grip half with "liquid paper". It adds just the right amount of extra grip with my natural finger perspiration without being too sticky.

    Santa brought me a Blue Chip for Christmas sized as close as I could determine to the Fenders I've been using for 25+ years to be...jury's still out.

  10. #9

    User Info Menu

    Simple. I drill a 5mm dia hole right in the centre of each D'andrea Pro Plec 351 - 'centre' meaning central to the widest part. Had to make a simple jig to get them all the same. I guess the hole could be reamed out larger if need be.

  11. #10

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by Cunamara
    Isn't it interesting how there are so many different preferences for many aspects of playing guitar? Most people hands are pretty similar in size and function- humans are fairly standardized physically- yet we have a lot of different experiences in what "works" for each of us.
    It is interesting. I think there is more to it than the hand, though. There's the guitar and how it is positioned in relation to the hand (and wrist and forearm and shoulder.) This is why Frank Vignola won't give advice on how to hold a pick. He's played with a boatload of pro guitarists and, according to him, they all hold the pick differently. I've had more trouble finding a suitable pick grip than any other aspect of playing guitar. Sometimes I ditch the pick and just play with my fingers. But that won't allow me to do certain things I want to do, so I go back to some pick or other. ;o)

  12. #11

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by sgosnell
    I have some Blue Chip picks, and it can be difficult to move the pick deliberately. The material the pick is made of seems to have built-in lubrication for sliding across the strings, but it sticks to my fingers so that I can remove my finger or thumb and the pick remains stuck to the remaining finger even if it's underneath the finger. It won't fall off. I can't do that with most other picks.
    I've been using Blue Chip picks for years and they never slip and sound great.

  13. #12

    User Info Menu

    When I first started playing I used to score my picks with a box cutter so they would have more grip. I haven't had to do that in a very long time because now I hold the pick firmly enough so that it doesn't go flying. Everyone is different. I am sure it would be different if I had sweaty hands.

  14. #13

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by goldpark
    For decades, the guitar pick has constantly slipped from my fingers. Finally discovered something that works -- poster putty! While it needs to be changed occasionally since it gets dirty, it provides just enough adhesion to keep the pick from slipping, yet I can easily disconnect from it. This is my 3.5 mm stone pick!

    Guitar Pick Slippage Solved-selection_893-jpg

    Mark
    Here is something more specialized (and not too expensive):

    Monster Grips: The Ultimate Grip for Guitar Picks and More!