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  1. #1

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    I'm sure its been discussed a bit before, but I figure I'd post an old-fashioned, minutiae -laden, fun and fact filled discussion post!

    I currently own a ES-125 from 1954 that is in great shape and, although I'm very much a beginner, I find it to be wonderful on so many levels.
    While perusing a local "sale site" I ran across a 1953 ES-150 that looked to be in decent shape. Kinda made me curious about the 1" size difference, block inlays and what else this model may have to offer in comparison to the ES-125.

    Anyone have some first hand experience with both? Much sound difference? PReference between the 2 and why?

    I look forward to reading responses and further avoiding work at the office!

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  3. #2

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    Cool topic. One source of sound difference would be the pickups. ES 125's from that era have single P90's right? ES 150's have CC pickups I think.
    Body dimensions and scale lengths are different also I believe.

  4. #3

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    I think you have to go older than the 50's for the CC, but I will definitely defer to the experts.
    The one I'm looking at appears to be a 1954 according to the serial number and it has the P-90 in it.

  5. #4

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    I like the bigger body 150, a bit of a fuller sound in general, but 125's are excellent too.
    And yes, CC pickups were done after 1940 except by special order.

  6. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by wintermoon
    I like the bigger body 150, a bit of a fuller sound in general, but 125's are excellent too.
    And yes, CC pickups were done after 1940 except by special order.
    OK makes sense. The reason I thought they may have CC is because I recently played a 50's model that had CC. That must have been a special order then.

  7. #6

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    Just strike a compromise and have them both. Choosing the right axe is an important pre-gig ritual, at least for me.

  8. #7

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    How is the ES-150 different from the ES-300?

  9. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by DMgolf66
    How is the ES-150 different from the ES-300?
    AFAIK it's cosmetic. Both are laminated, P90 equipped, 17 inches wide, no cutaway and rosewood fingerboard. The ES-300 was the top of the line for electrics immediately post war whereas the ES-150 (post war, not CC unit) was a more economical model (no binding on the neck until 1950 then binding until 1956)). They went through several variants over the years and they were discontinued at the same time around 1956.


    Both are damned good guitars and bebop war machines.

    Highly recommended!

    Cheers.

  10. #9

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    Apart from what has already been mentioned, the 125 has 24.75" scale while the postwar 150 has 25.5" scale.

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  11. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by oldane
    Apart from what has already been mentioned, the 125 has 24.75" scale while the postwar 150 has 25.5" scale.

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    oh wow, never knew this.... I can play either of course, but have always preferred the 25.5" scale.

  12. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by Fred Archtop
    AFAIK it's cosmetic. Both are laminated, P90 equipped, 17 inches wide, no cutaway and rosewood fingerboard. The ES-300 was the top of the line for electrics immediately post war whereas the ES-150 (post war, not CC unit) was a more economical model (no binding on the neck until 1950 then binding until 1956)). They went through several variants over the years and they were discontinued at the same time around 1956.


    Both are damned good guitars and bebop war machines.

    Highly recommended!

    Cheers.
    Agreed. I own a 1947 blonde ES 300 and it is a much more luxurious guitar than my 125. Very pretty woods (flames galore) and bindings on the 300. Sounds bigger too than the 125 but both are definitely from the same vein and the 150 is too. The 300 was Gibson's top of the line after the war whereas the 125 and 150 were economy models.

    Yesterday I posted a new video in the showcase section on the 300. That's pretty much what it sounds like.

    DB

  13. #12

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    I have never played a 300 or a 350, but own a very well conditioned ES-125 from 1957. Apples-to-Apples (condition wise)Its a big jump in price from a 125 to a 300/350, it seems. I also get the feeling I could rationalize judging from the beautiful ones that you own, Dick. Also, Fred Archtop's examples are in the same league.