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  1. #1
    Hi All,

    Having built a reputation of being overly wordy and priming friends in favor of my leaning before I ask gear-dilemma related questions, I figured i'd keep short for a change.

    *While i'm eager for all opinions, This post is directed to those who have experience with both guitars (the L5 and the Benedetto Manhattan [certainly those who've played the Cremona, Fratello, and any other carved solid wood Benedetto models would have good insights as well])*

    I have been saving up for a real deal archtop for a while. I've lusted after the big, clear, non-tinny, buoyant and round sound of the L5 (Update 12/3: *im reffering to the CES*, a very different sound) and on the other hand, I have a great appreciation for the radically more acoustically sensitive (at least to me) and more acoustic sounding (when plugged in as well) solid wood Benedetto designs.

    While the Savannah GA team make incredible guitars, I have a rare opportunity to acquire a friend's Benedetto Manhattan made by Bob Benedetto himself in the 90's. I have another opportunity at a 63' L5.

    Both guitars are exactly the same price, so if we could assess pros and cons/express opinions with price being out of the debate, that would be great!

    Please let me know what you guys think of the pros/cons of these two guitars, which you'd rather own, and why. I know there are many factors involved but thats fine. Go! And thank you all so kindly in advance!!

    Does anyone have a pre 64' L5 CES for sale or know of someone who may want to sell theirs? If So, Please message me!

    Best,
    Reed
    Last edited by ReedAmbedastam; 12-04-2019 at 02:06 AM.

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  3. #2

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    I have played a friends Benedetto La Venezia on a few gigs, I have played at least a dozen other carved Benedettos and I own a couple of L-5's (and have played at least 20 others). Now each guitar is different and I have played some L-5's (well a couple to be exact) that were dogs, but on balance, I would suggest the L-5.

    For jazz guitar, a good L-5 cannot be beat.

  4. #3

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    I like Benedettos a lot. I'm not a Gibson fan. I would take the Manhattan without much hesitation. But they are very different guitars, and it's entirely a matter of taste, and which sound you prefer. Your taste is your own, and there is no need to apologize for it. Play both guitars, and make your choice solely on your preference, not on those of strangers on the internet.

  5. #4
    Not sure when gibson made those 1 9/16th neck widths I think that was early 60s though. That would be a deal breaker for me. Are you able to play both?

  6. #5

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    Very different guitars. Bob makes a fine guitar and a good 1963 L5 ranks up with finest.

    Which one I liked better playing would be the one I choose. Normally boutique guitars don’t hold with Gibsons with some exceptions. A Benedetto made by Bob himself would be an exception. That said if the L5 felt better in my hands and played better that would be my choice.

    I have played a fair number of Benedetto from earliest to later years. Tons of L5s for sure. It is what the ears hear so you got work to do.

  7. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by rhoadsscholar
    Not sure when gibson made those 1 9/16th neck widths I think that was early 60s though. That would be a deal breaker for me. Are you able to play both?
    Great point, Rhoads. I’m not positive but will check - it’s surely a good point to keep in mind! Thankfully I’ve been comfortable on the early 60’s neck widths and dare I say it, even on the thinner profiles (although the 60/61 profiles aren’t ideal for me).

  8. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by deacon Mark
    Very different guitars. Bob makes a fine guitar and a good 1963 L5 ranks up with finest.

    Which one I liked better playing would be the one I choose. Normally boutique guitars don’t hold with Gibsons with some exceptions. A Benedetto made by Bob himself would be an exception. That said if the L5 felt better in my hands and played better that would be my choice.

    I have played a fair number of Benedetto from earliest to later years. Tons of L5s for sure. It is what the ears hear so you got work to do.
    Thanks! I absolutely agree - after all, you play how you feel and it’s whats most tonally and musically inspiring + what feels great that I’ll want to keep - thing is, it’s hard to get my hands on a Manhattan. Even in LA. I’ve played Jimmy Bruno’s 7 string Benedetto at Norm’s and remember being amazed (before noticing that the tailpiece said Jimmy Bruno Lol) but I can’t remember exactly how it sounded (and it was a bit different than a Manhattan).

    How would you compare your experiences and tonal/feel perceptions with the Bob built benedettos you’ve played vs the vintage L5s? I have my understanding from what little experience I’ve had with my hands on benedettos (despite listening to tens and tens of clips), but I’m interested in what you all have to say.

  9. #8

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    I own a 1989 Benedetto Fratello (built by Bob) and a 1963 L5C. Both have floating pickups. The Benedetto is a better guitar in my opinion. It has a perfectly balanced, warm acoustic tone. The L5 is brighter. The Benedetto has a 1 3/4” nut and 25” scale. The neck is not too deep front-to-back, so the extra nut width doesn’t make it feel big at all. The L5 has a 1 5/8” nut, which is still ok (only 1/16” narrower than a modern L5). The Benedetto is a different body size, slightly thinner, like a Johnny Smith. Amplified, both guitars perform equally well. The Benedetto has a tone control on the pickguard, which I prefer over the L5’s Johnny Smith setup. If I could only keep one, it would be the Benedetto.
    Keith

  10. #9

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    I was the lucky owner of a Fratello that was built in Florida and I never owned an acoustic L5 but a '62 Johnny Smith and a '62 Super-400C.
    All three were very nice examples of the type but as far as fit and finish and playabilty was concerned the Fratello was the clear winner, followed closely by the Super-400C (which still had the somewhat beefier 3-piece neck). The plugged-in tone of the Fratello was balanced, warm and had not much "character" whereas the Super with a vintage DeArmond Rhythm Chief pickup (including the original control-box) was "IT" for the traditional/old school fat and warm but still clear Jazz Guitar Sound. Unfortunately the guitar was much too prone to feedback so I could not really use it on stage, it was sold again. The Fratello left in order to finance my new home (in parts....) and the Johnny Smith was sold to finance an electric Super-400 which is the better guitar for my needs.
    When you play your guitar only at home and mostly un-plugged then I'd say the Benedetto would be the "better" choice for it's balanced acoustic tone. When plugged in a vintage Gibson (with the "right" pickup) is hard to beat.
    As far as resale value is concerned it's a toss-up in my view. Benedetto has a following , especially with the older models and a vintage L5 in good/excellent condition will also hold it's value - the market is weak though so don't expect a fast return ...

  11. #10

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    I have not personally owned at Bennedetto and no real desire to own one, but has mostly to do with my association with other guitar builders. I have played many though and the last Bennedetto that Bob made that I spent some time with was the one he made for Chinery Blue collection. It was an 18 inch guitar with very good sound. Nice round deeper bass that I like and played otherwise fine. Was it better than than the Chinery Blue Super 400? I do not remember and probably could not tell.

    My guess is Bob's guitars would be consistent as long as they were not modifications for the guitar built specifically for the person. Gibson's could be very consistent within the same era they are made. Gibson L5's from the late 1930's thru probably the mid 50's acoustically are fine guitars. They compete well with even D'angelico's and Strombergs. The difference being at least with a Dangelico the player was getting a guitar made exact to what they wanted in terms of neck size, scale length and even the sound they were going after to a degree. Gibson could not really do that and so D'a s are held as the standard. From all I have read and studied John D'angelico was a very nice man and had a personality that went along with his guitars. His guitars were his work and creation so to me he simply had more skin in the game than maybe anyone else.

    I would assume to some degree Bob Bennedetto equally manage the same reputation. That said Gibson still built the guitars largely by hand and things fairly consistent until after the early 1960's. Any given acoustic L5 from that period in my view has the potential to be some one of the finest archtop guitars for sound and playability. At some point a guitar from each of the best sources becomes what a player prefers so everyone is different. My 18 inch Hollenbeck plays and has more sound than almost any L5 if have ever touched. Acoustically I would hard pressed say I ever played and L5 that was better but we could be splitting hairs too. The 17 inch Hollenbeck that is not mine I have in the shop equally has the sound of any L5. That said it is not a L5 and unless lighting strikes they will never be worth what an L5 is.

    Bennedetto's sit bit higher up on the food chain for possible resale for sure but that might not be till we are long dead and forgotten. At this stage in the archtop game a standard Gibson L5 acoustic that is a good guitar is the winner. It is the winner in terms of recognition and quality. Just to also mention I just bought a 2005 Gibson Super 400 CES Hutchinson signed. While this guitar is not a complete acoustic the quality control is second to none. Believe me I repair and see many guitars and this S400 is amazing. The fret work and finish are as good as I have seen on any guitar bar none. In fact I would put the QC level above most all boutique guitars I have played. My first impression playing the neck and going across the frets was WOW, they did a better fret job than I can do. I do think I can make a neck and frets play great on a guitar and Gibson humbled me completely.

    So what about the Bennedetto. Unless the Benny was a clear winner from all the aspects I would say stick with a Gibson. I don't know the price of these guitar you are looking at but if they come close to a Dangelico then you might just bypass and get a D'a.

  12. #11

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    So if acoustic tone is what your after, may I suggest a Buscarino 17" archtop. Of all of the acoustic Archtops I've ever played,that one stood out to my ears.
    They should be available used with different levels of appointments.

    But only you can decide which builder or model speaks to you!

  13. #12

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    Looks like Benedetto's inspiration came from early, acoustic Gibson L-5's. I think the same is true for Campellone as well.

    "It's doubtful any of today’s archtop guitar makers would deny Gibson’s overwhelming contribution to the guitar’s design. Although I have never made a carbon copy of the original 16-inch L-5, I have enjoyed making variations on that model using both traditional and alternative woods, a variety of soundhole designs, inlays, bindings and of course colors. While the most obvious differences have been aesthetic, variations also included top and back graduations and bracing designs." Bob Benedetto, 2013




    Benedetto - Gibson L-5

  14. #13

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    Jazz guitarist Royce Campbell owns and plays both a Benedetto Manhattan and a Gibson L5CES. When I first met Royce, he was performing with the Benedetto. However, Royce has owned the L5 going back to when he purchased it to perform with Henry Mancini (which he did for almost 20 years). These days, Royce uses the L5 again.

    I like the sound he gets from either guitar. They are both tremendous instruments. I probably prefer the L5 sound that Campbell gets.

  15. #14

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    My bad...Campbell's Benedetto is a Fratello.

  16. #15

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    Are we talking about acoustic guitars w/floating pickups or set in?
    Makes all the difference imo.
    Really depends on the sound/application you're going for.

  17. #16

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    Well...it's sorta apples and oranges in that the Benny has a floating pickup and the L5CES has set in pickup(s)--one for the Wes Montgomery model and two for the CES.

    _Both_ guitars are superb archtops, each in its own way.

  18. #17

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    I didn't see a CES reference in the OPs post, he mentioned a 63 L5 but didn't say it was an electric model unless I missed something, hence my question.

  19. #18

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    Here's Campbell playing Dindi on his L5:


    Here's Campbell playing The Christmas Song on his Benedetto:


    Both sound really good, but you can hear the differences, no?

  20. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by Greentone
    Here's Campbell playing Dindi on his L5:


    Here's Campbell playing The Christmas Song on his Benedetto:


    Both sound really good, but you can hear the differences, no?
    Very clearly. Benedetto has a more acoustic sound. A littler brighter and airier (thinner in a good way). L5 has a more full and electric sound (comparatively). One thing always noticeable about L5's is that they often sound like they are operating at the 10% of their volume potential. Like an exotic sports car cruising on small roads. You can feel L5's dynamic potential even when it's played relatively quietly. Like it's ready to make explosive sounds as soon as you dig in. I guess that's because of the very deep body construction.

  21. #20

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    My assumption in all the post is the OP is looking an acoustic archtop not built in. I did throw in a reference to S400ces just to talk about QC at Gibson, but it clearly think the OP is looking for sound acoustically first. Yes a built in is apples and oranges.

  22. #21

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    Quote Originally Posted by wintermoon
    Are we talking about acoustic guitars w/floating pickups or set in?
    Makes all the difference imo.
    Really depends on the sound/application you're going for.
    I agree. I've owned both and preferred the L5 w/mounted pickups because I played them amplified. The amplified sound on the L5 pleased me more than the Benedetto / floater. No other reason. Both are wonderful instruments.

    Cincy

  23. #22

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tal_175
    Very clearly. Benedetto has a more acoustic sound. A littler brighter and airier (thinner in a good way). L5 has a more full and electric sound (comparatively). One thing always noticeable about L5's is that they often sound like they are operating at the 10% of their volume potential. Like an exotic sports car cruising on small roads. You can feel L5's dynamic potential even when it's played relatively quietly. Like it's ready to make explosive sounds as soon as you dig in. I guess that's because of the very deep body construction.
    Royce’s L5 is a CES, which is why it sounds more “electric” compared to his Fratello, which has a floating pickup. My earlier comments were about my L5C with a floating pickup, compared to my Benedetto which also has a floating pickup. I agree that Royce’s L5CES sounds very different, but that is really a different instrument than either of those. I am a big fan of built in pickups too. I play an L5CES on most of my gigs because you can always count on that type of guitar sounding great, regardless of the type of room, the volume, etc. The built in pickups are also typically warmer, which I like. I thought the OP was asking about a Benedetto vs. an L5C.
    Keith

  24. #23

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    Lots of excellent advice from the esteemed members of the forum. I own and gig on a regular basis with my 1990 Bob built Benedetto Cremona. It has a Bartolini floater. It is a very special, exquisite instrument. I owned a L-5 CES back in the 80's and never bonded with it. I've played some very fine L-5 and S400's over the years,none of them touched my heartstrings like my Cremona.

    That being said, it is not a Swiss Army knife instrument. I gig in a duo format with a Trumpet/Flugel player doing ASB material and Jazz Standards. I plug the BC directly into a Evans JE200, no effects other than a smidge of Reverb. We play at low volume so I don't have any feedback issues.

    In summary, I don't have much to contribute or advice to offer. I am totally biased. It all comes down to which instrument flips your switch.
    Attached Images Attached Images First world prob: Benedetto Manhattan Or L5-bspring-jpg 

  25. #24
    Wow.. thank you. Im overwhelmed by all the care and really helpful responses. Really grateful for all of your thoughts!!

    @floatingpickup @gitman @wintermoon @deacon mark (and everyone else!!) im really sorry for not being more clear.. this post is definitely a debate about an apple and an orange - This thread is Benedetto Manhattan w/ Floating pickup v. pre norlin L5 CES (probably a 63' i have in mind). I'm debating whether or not which of the two guitars i've lusted after for years makes the most sense for me to buy as far as function and priority at the current moment, funds aside as both are close in price.

    I know its rather odd as these guitars are so different but i'd love to hear some pros and cons about each. I love the idea and the sounds of both lol but frankly, the benedetto sounds much less big and round - its got an even more traditional sound to me than the L5 CES - I love it (not having played the exact guitar model but having played a similar 7 str) but based on my limited experience and on soundclips, of course, the L5 CES carries much more weight when it comes to linear playing.

    @deaconmark, wonderful insights.. thanks so much. I need to hip myself to Hollenbeck too, it sounds like. No, unfortunately the price range im looking at doesnt quite come close to a real D'A from the grail days. Really appreciate you discussing.

    @greentone, you're spot on with the apples v oranges. they are.
    And thank you kindly for the great comparison clips!

    @sierratango, Wow.. that cremona is to die for. I can only imagine how awesome that thing sounds.. beautiful instrument! Even biased insights are welcomed lol you're well experienced on a Bob built guitar and that is super helpful!
    Last edited by ReedAmbedastam; 12-04-2019 at 04:54 AM.

  26. #25

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    I'm partial to built in pickup guitars, so the L-5 would be an absolute no brainer for me.

  27. #26

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    I am fortunate to be able to own a great, full-sized, carved-body archtop guitar with a floating pickup, and a couple of full-sized, (one carved, one laminate) archtop CES guitars. I enjoy all of them. They scratch different itches, as it were.

    When I want a full, jazzy, wood and strings tone for solo work or when playing in small combo settings, I go for the archtop with floater. If the music is going to be more brisk, more volume, more instruments, I grab one of the CES guitars.

    I suppose that if I were to sell off everything and choose to play with a single guitar, it would be a Gibson L-5CES. It will cover a _lot_ of territory.

  28. #27

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    ...Even in LA. I’ve played Jimmy Bruno’s 7 string Benedetto at Norm’s and remember being amazed (before noticing that the tailpiece said Jimmy Bruno Lol) but I can’t remember exactly how it sounded (and it was a bit different than a Manhattan...

    Ironically it was Jimmy Bruno that introduced me to Bob's instruments when I took some lessons from him in Philly in the the mid-90's. I did get a chance to play one of his 7 string Benedetto's. It was like a bolt of lightning hit me and I knew I had to have one of Bob's guitars. As I recall he had two of them.

    Good luck on your quest!




    Attached Images Attached Images First world prob: Benedetto Manhattan Or L5-g-m-dv-5-19-jpg 

  29. #28
    Hi Guys (and gal? lol), coming back for a quick follow up question if anyone might be able to help/point me in the right direction. While i'm not necessarily in a rush, there are hardly any old L5 CESs available online these days it seems.

    Does anyone have a 64 (or earlier) L5 CES in moderate+ condition that they're willing/looking to sell? And or does anyone have anyone in mind who might?

    Any help would be greatly appreciated Thanks!

  30. #29

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    Quote Originally Posted by ReedAmbedastam
    ...L5 (Update 12/3: *im reffering to the CES*...) ...I have another opportunity at a 63' L5. ...
    The L-5CES guitars from this timeframe typically have:
    -Florentine (pointy) cutaways;
    -small necks @1 9/16" nut width;
    -laminated backs.
    Is the guitar that you have an opportunity to get one of these or something different?
    Last edited by Hammertone; 12-19-2019 at 11:12 AM.

  31. #30

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    I’m biased, as I have a ‘97 Wesmo that I love, but a local shop had a Fratello and a ‘64 CES at the same time, (rare for these parts) and I had a chance to play both for a few minutes a month ago. I agree that the Fratello was immaculately constructed, played well and reminded me very much of my Sadowsky Jim Hall, with more volume, acoustic overtones and more rapid note decay, but the L5, even with round wounds, just had that right mix of richness to my ears, like hitting the “loudness” button.

    If it hadn’t had an eyelet screw twisted into the neck to clip in some kind of dog leash guitar strap and subsequent unfortunate wear over the upper bout (hillbilly owner, I guess) I might have been thinking about how to scrounge up the scratch, but luckily, I have my limits when it comes to mojo tolerance and it was sold. Short of a Bravo, that’s the only high end Benedetto I’ve played and it confirmed what I have heard in recordings. Nice stuff, but I’m a Gibson guy.

  32. #31

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    Quote Originally Posted by ReedAmbedastam
    Hi Guys (and gal? lol), coming back for a quick follow up question if anyone might be able to help/point me in the right direction. While i'm not necessarily in a rush, there are hardly any old L5 CESs available online these days it seems.

    Does anyone have a 64 (or earlier) L5 CES in moderate+ condition that they're willing/looking to sell? And or does anyone have anyone in mind who might?

    Any help would be greatly appreciated Thanks!
    I actually think Gibson L5's from the 1990s and after are probably better guitars. I would never be looking for a 60's one based on what I have played from Gibson in in the most recent years. I think think the QC was much better. I have a Hutch 2005 Super 400ces that was set up perfect as good as they get and I have played many guitars from many makers.

  33. #32
    Hammertone, the L5CES im considering is a 63 with a venetian as you say but I believe it to have a wider nut width

    Yebdox, much appreciated thoughts and feedback. Pretty sure I was there at the time and played that same L5 if it was the 64' cherry burst at emerald city and thought it sounded great too (and that the eyelet thing was hillbilly/janky too) lol!

    Hey Deacon, thanks for that. I guess I havent given the new ones enough thought because i always lean vintage mainly being a solid body player who personally feels gibsons solid bodies dont come near their 50's and early 60's stuff (yes, even the high dollar stuff ive played). I'll have to play some newer archtops/CES's! Thanks.

  34. #33

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    If it is a 63' it will have a 1 11/16" , as the 1 9/16 nut comes along in 1965 and continues to 1969.
    There are some early 1965s that still had a 1 11/16" nut, I've seen a few ES175s like that.
    Where do you even find a 63' L5CES? And, all of the ones I've seen are 15-18k.
    PD

  35. #34

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    Reed (OP),
    After reviewing your posts including the question of installing a built-in pickup into a (acoustic) S-400, I was wondering-what are you seeking? How are you going to use the instrument? Are you gigging with it, or playing at home with friends?

    It seems you are focused on Vintage L-5 CES guitars due to your solidbody experience with Gibson products. I have to agree with the Deacon, Gibson produced some outstanding archtops starting in the 90's. They may not have the vintage vibe however they can be lifetime voice guitars.

    As a professional player, I stopped collecting many years ago and have 4 guitars that cover what I do to generate income-the Cremona, a 53 Epi Triumph Regent with no pickup, a Dupont MC 30-14 fret and a Eastman John Pisano 880.

    Once again, wishing you the best on your quest.
    Attached Images Attached Images First world prob: Benedetto Manhattan Or L5-pvm-gig-jpg First world prob: Benedetto Manhattan Or L5-epiatsprings-jpg First world prob: Benedetto Manhattan Or L5-mc30-3-jpg 

  36. #35

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  37. #36

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    I am not a fan of pointed cutaways and those are pretty pricey guitars. I am quite sure I could find many guitars that would fit the bill at the price of those L5's. I suppose people buy them but I bet they don't sell too many and never fast. Otherwise they look nice but just cannot believe anyone is paying those prices.
    s

  38. #37

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    "I actually think Gibson L5's from the 1990s and after are probably better guitars. I would never be looking for a 60's one based on what I have played from Gibson in in the most recent years."

    while the newer L-5's and Super 400's are outstanding and built just as well as the earlier models, I've never played any modern L-5 or Super 400 that comes close in sound to most early/mid 60s models.
    aged woods, having been played in, the magic of PAF and early patent number pickups contribute to this.
    you can't base this on having owned or played a couple of each,
    I've owned multiple examples of all and played countless others, and I almost always come to this conclusion.
    again, no offense to modern Gibson owners, but it is what it is....


  39. #38

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    Quote Originally Posted by deacon Mark
    I am not a fan of pointed cutaways and those are pretty pricey guitars. I am quite sure I could find many guitars that would fit the bill at the price of those L5's. I suppose people buy them but I bet they don't sell too many and never fast. Otherwise they look nice but just cannot believe anyone is paying those prices.
    s
    sorry, that post wasn't for you Deacon, the OP asked .
    and yes, they ARE paying those prices, not that many around for sale at any given time.

  40. #39

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    Quote Originally Posted by ReedAmbedastam
    Yebdox, much appreciated thoughts and feedback. Pretty sure I was there at the time and played that same L5 if it was the 64' cherry burst at emerald city and thought it sounded great too (and that the eyelet thing was hillbilly/janky too) lol!
    Funny, that's definitely the guitar, but it was in Spokane at River City Guitars just 3 weeks ago. Sounded great!

  41. #40

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    Quote Originally Posted by PDeville
    If it is a 63' it will have a 1 11/16" , as the 1 9/16 nut comes along in 1965 and continues to 1969.
    There are some early 1965s that still had a 1 11/16" nut, I've seen a few ES175s like that.
    Where do you even find a 63' L5CES? And, all of the ones I've seen are 15-18k.
    PD
    My 1963 L5C has a nut width of 1 5/8”. That falls right in the middle, 1/16 wider than the very narrow nut and 1/16 narrower than the standard nut. Perhaps CES models are different.
    Keith

  42. #41

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    My 1966 L5CES has a 1-5/8" nut width.

  43. #42

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bebop Tom
    My 1966 L5CES has a 1-5/8" nut width.
    ...and I find that size isn’t hard to get used to.
    Keith

  44. #43

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    I have expressed this opinion before, but it might also be relevant to this conversation...An L5 from the early Norlin era is a less expensive option worth considering. My main gigging guitar is a ‘75 L5CESN. At that time, they had returned to the 1 11/16” nut and hadn’t added the volute yet. They had those nice big Kluson tuners and decent patent-stamped t-top humbuckers. They came standard with ebony saddles, which many players prefer over tune-o-matics. Guitars of this era were still made in the legendary Kalamazoo factory and I don’t believe the quality suffered significantly on the high-end hand-carved archtops during that period. The only downside, is the plain maple that was used on the backs and sides, but that probably has little or no effect on tone. I also don’t really like the look of witch-hat knobs, so I put reflector knobs on mine. I believe these guitars are a good buy in today’s market.
    Keith
    First world prob: Benedetto Manhattan Or L5-1cafb336-dc27-471a-9bd8-69ce3c0745e4-jpg

  45. #44

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    Quote Originally Posted by floatingpickup
    ...and I find that size isn’t hard to get used to.
    Keith
    I too find that size hard to get used to. I can handle it but not my favorite. Your are pretty spot on with the Norlin era stuff. I have a friend I did some work on his Super 400ces from 1976 and it has tremendous sound and great neck. It is a fantastic guitar and I believe he may have it for sale in the section. I made a new pickguard for the guitar but otherwise this is guitar is wonderful.

  46. #45

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    Quote Originally Posted by deacon Mark
    I made a new pickguard for the guitar but otherwise this is guitar is wonderful.
    You're too humble. I'm sure your pickguard is wonderful too.

  47. #46

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    The L5CES is just the right size