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  1. #1

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    Anybody have experience with the newer models? A student of mine bought one (an older, simpler model used)and I got to play thru it yesterday...thought it was great. Probably a whole bunch of features I'd never use, but sounded way better than my old microcube.

    The new ones have bluetooth and (at an upcharge) wireless too...anybody have one? Thinking it might be my Christmas present this year...even if its "to myself."

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  3. #2

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    Because of the new models THR10C is going on sale which you may like as well as the new ones. It's a great portable amp with modeling that rivals the fancier devices.

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  4. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by mr. beaumont
    ... sounded way better than my old microcube.
    You don't say?!

    I love the tone from my trusty microcube and have often said "yup" to myself when reading your praise of the battery-powered little gem.

  5. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Neverisky
    You don't say?!

    I love the tone from my trusty microcube and have often said "yup" to myself when reading your praise of the battery-powered little gem.
    Definitely better, and "bigger" sounding. The microcube is great for what it is, and it records incredibly well through my phone...the bass response and dirty tones are better thru the yamaha, at least from what I gathered in a half hour of messing around.

    The coolest part though was using the bluetooth and playing an Aebersold off my phone. Sounded just great, and independent guitar/aux controls.

  6. #5

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    I have the earlier THR10C and I like it OK. Nice build, good "hi-fi" sound.
    My gripe about it is the reverb goes from zero to too-much in the smallest twitch of the dial. Not cool.
    I've thought about selling it, but . . . it makes a really nice aux speaker too.

  7. #6

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    haven't tried the newer ones but I bought the 100w head a couple years ago and didn't like it. I thought it was grainy.

  8. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by Longways to Go
    I have the earlier THR10C and I like it OK. Nice build, good "hi-fi" sound.
    My gripe about it is the reverb goes from zero to too-much in the smallest twitch of the dial. Not cool.
    I've thought about selling it, but . . . it makes a really nice aux speaker too.
    Yes, I had to make jazz presets using the software which allows for very small increments on the reverb and other controls.

  9. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by medblues
    Yes, I had to make jazz presets using the software which allows for very small increments on the reverb and other controls.
    Maybe this is the key? I plugged a standard Telecaster into a couple of these tabletop amps over the weekend and was unable to find a compelling tone. I chose an in-stock Tele because that's what I play at home.

    One was a $150 model and the other was $400-ish model 30 something.

  10. #9

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    I also had the older (non-bluetooth) one, I guess the new ones are basically the same unit with some cosmetic changes and the bluetooth upgrade.

    I sold it because I got a 57 Champ and didn't need two small amps. Yamaha sounds big for it's size and some of the overdriven tones are good unless you go for the extremes. They also make nice computer speakers since they are stereo and sound good. Much better than most computer speakers. The new ones are effectively also bluetooth speakers. Two in one deal.

    There is a particular sound when they design small speaker systems to have a big bass response. The bass is there but has different qualities than the same amount of bass response coming from bigger cabinets. I hear that even when I play a Henriksen Blu. My Bose bluetooth speaker also has that sound. That's my only criticism but you can't have both portable size and rich bass.

  11. #10

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    My daughter bought me the base model THR10-II as a birthday present, we had been discussing the THR10C but this was no longer available locally. Part of the reason for looking at the THR series was to overcome some shortcomings that I see with my Line 6 Amplifi 75. I don't want to be using an app on a phone or tablet to control the amp as it sits next to my desktop MacPro and is wired to it via USB. The sales reps at the Melbourne guitar show talked up the THR series as a solution, computer based patch editing, USB connection, ability to record simultaneous wet and dry signals all appeared to be good points, the choice of amp models in the THR10C seemed appropriate and there was the ability to use batteries if I ever felt so inclined. BUT this was the THR10C.
    The new version combines the total of fifteen amp models from across the range of original THR versions, but on the 10 watt versions only five are available from the control panel, the others are selected in software. For the 30 watt version they are switch select-able from the control panel. The top 2 models in the range have built in batteries and the ability to receive signals from a Line 6 wireless transmitter [separate purchase]. The base model loses the ability to run from batteries.
    All have Bluetooth connection to media players and the ability to be managed by phone or tablet apps. They can also be managed from desktop machines but from a Mac perspective only the very latest operating systems are supported, OS Sierra or earlier will not work. None of the patches are compatible with earlier versions of the amps and software, likewise no earlier patches can be transferred to the later amps.
    They have lost some functionality including the Rack Compressor emulation and the ability to record USB output as both wet and dry stereo pairs simultaneously although the latter may be addressed in a firmware upgrade. The 30 watt version has quarter inch TRS outputs which can be software selected as either wet or dry.
    All-in-all the base model is a nice little amp that has some features that are more user friendly than the Line 6 amplifi and while everything I saw and read about the THR10C made it look eminently useful to me Yamaha, [who also own Line 6 and either own or manage VOX products in Australia], seem to have combined the worst features of the Amplifi and THR products without offering any real upside to those who do not have the latest [Apple] computer hardware.
    Some features I could not test as the USB driver for Mac was not compatible with my MacPro 5,1 and the software could not be loaded on my Win10 notebook as it was already licensed on the Mac.
    I am happy to try to answer other questions if I can.
    The real positive is that it makes a handy speaker system and media player for my MacBook Pro [as long as I am near a power socket] and if I ever want to sound like a shredder the distortion is only a switch away!
    Last edited by thelostboss; 12-07-2019 at 06:58 AM. Reason: Corrections