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  1. #1

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    So I received around 50 or so BF ads in my email, and that was just today! JEEZ, ENOUGH ALREADY!!!

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    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #2

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    I had sort of thought BF was a gone event as stores stayed open and people can always shop online but I guess not. I too have received many emails of BF specials but nothing I need or anyone else I know needs.

  4. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by deacon Mark
    I had sort of thought BF was a gone event as stores stayed open and people can always shop online but I guess not. I too have received many emails of BF specials but nothing I need or anyone else I know needs.
    Many of mine were from online music gear vendors like MF, Sweetwater, Carvin, Reverb, etc.

  5. #4

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    I decided to totally boycott the BF idea from now on - no use to spend money on things i actually don't need. There's enough unused stuff lying around already.

  6. #5

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    Stay home and save 100%

  7. #6

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    I like what some French MPs are calling for: Black Friday: French MPs call for sales frenzy to be banned | The Independent
    MPs in France have called for the country to ban Black Friday, the November sales event that has morphed into a global phenomenon.

    A French legislative committee has passed an amendment proposing to make it against the law to promote the annual shopping frenzy, warning the extra sales causes “resources waste” and “overconsumption”.

    The proposal, put forward by France’s former environment minister Delphine Batho, will be debated next month in the National Assembly, the lower house of parliament.
    France’s e-commerce union has condemned the move.

    Separately, the ecological transition minister, Elisabeth Borne, has criticised Black Friday for creating “traffic jams, pollution, and gas emissions”.

    “We cannot both reduce greenhouse gas emissions and call for a consumer frenzy. Above all, we must consume better,” she told BFM Business.

    She added she would support Black Friday if it helped small French traders, but said it mostly benefited large online retailers.

    French climate activists are planning a “Block Friday” demonstration to coincide with the sales on Friday.?

  8. #7

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    I am tired of the ads too.

    FWIW, a competitive shopper I know swears BF is BS and that the best deals are offered around 11 Dec. (Two weeks before Christmas. That's when stores know what they still have and how much they need to move asap. Not every item will be greatly discounted but many will.)

    All I want for Christmas is a Squier Affinity Telecaster (butterscotch blonde) and my fiance (-who will by then be my wife) says my odds of getting one are looking a lot better than my room. ;o)

  9. #8

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    I think I've received muliple BF emails from every company I've ever done business with, or given an email address. If there is any mention of Black Friday in the subject or the first line that shows in the preview, it goes straight to the trash. And I agree that the best deals are closer to Dec 25, as retailers become increasingly desperate to sell inventory. It's a shame that retailers have become so dependent on one month of the year to make an annual profit.

  10. #9

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    The ladies in my family take a back seat to no-one when it comes to shopping. Never the less, BF is a stay at home, mind our own business, deal with the leftovers lay-zee day.

  11. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by sgosnell
    I think I've received muliple BF emails from every company I've ever done business with, or given an email address. If there is any mention of Black Friday in the subject or the first line that shows in the preview, it goes straight to the trash. And I agree that the best deals are closer to Dec 25, as retailers become increasingly desperate to sell inventory. It's a shame that retailers have become so dependent on one month of the year to make an annual profit.
    While I am not personally religious, it also seems like a shame that what is a fundamentally religious holiday is co-opted into commerce and capitalism- indeed, a cornerstone of the economy here in the US.

  12. #11

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    We are quite on the voluntarily simplicity mindset and shake head at the need for consumption created by event like black friday or boxing day...
    No we don't need the latest smartphone or the 16K QLED TV...
    If we truly need something we always look for the best price online or at our local shops.
    My wife has a nice closet of 2nd hand super nice and clean clothes for the office, she just spent a huge 45$ for many blazers and pants like 2 weeks ago!
    Crazy what people are disposing off, their loss our win!
    I tend to care and keep my stuff for a very long time and always try to give a second life to things if possible.
    Its our way of doing our share for environment, not feeding the "Green" alternate market...

  13. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cunamara
    what is a fundamentally religious holiday is co-opted into commerce and capitalism-

    Religious holiday??? Tell us more.

  14. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by Doug B
    Religious holiday??? Tell us more.
    I found this:

    The December Christmas observance began as a pagan holiday that was “papered over” with Christian meaning when the Roman Empire officially converted to Christianity in the 4th century.
    Early Christians refused to recognize it because:
    1) they knew Jesus wasn’t born on December 25, and
    2) nearly all the signs and symbols associated with Christmas had recognizable pagan origins.
    It took about 200 years for it to gain acceptance and be viewed by Christians as a celebration of the Lord’s birth.
    But in recent times it seems like the celebration has reverted back to its pagan origins. Therefore, Christians are beginning to opt out again.


    ...at this site: Is Christmas A Pagan Holiday? – Grace thru faith (definitely a Christian perspective, but then, Christmas as a "non-pagan" holiday was originally that as is indicated in the quote)

    There are many other references to this history elsewhere, and from different perspectives, to be found by google searches for those who are interested. I personally am neutral on the whole deal. Let those who want to, celebrate the holiday according to their own personal beliefs, and those who wish to do otherwise, do so.

    What I do think is rather odd is how we blow all our holidays in a very short time frame, leaving most of the winter with nothing. It reminds me of workers who would get paid on Friday, blow it all over the weekend, and then have to get by the rest of the week until the next payday. Halloween -> Thanksgiving -> Christmas -> New Year -> nothing for months after except the bleak of winter. It would make more sense to me to spread it all out so there is always something to look forward too and to break up the bleakness of winter with some cheer.

    Tony




  15. #14

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    I sat here reading this thread nodding yes to many of the points.
    Companies are gonna try to make a buck any way they can, it's Capitalism at it's ugliest.
    Black Friday Sales ?? Spare me.

    Most of these emails have an UNSUBSCRIBE option hidden waaaaay near the end in very small print, use it until you stop hearing from them.

    With my handicaps I send Lou Malnatti's pizza packs to those nearest and dearest
    Fannie May Candy hand delivered to my neighbors (Jewel has 2 for 1 sales so I stock up)


    And a personal call to those I really care about. You get to be my age you already have everything. Just talking to someone dear is what matters to me most.


    Have a terrific Holiday season boys


    Big

  16. #15

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    Kind if of topic but a few years ago we had an African priest from Uganda visiting for 3 months during Christmas. He was completely amazed. He said in Uganda among the Christians they start thinking about Christmas for maybe 3 days before the 25th. He could not get over all the fuss in November.

    In the interest of Christmas buy a guitar get the one you like, probably nobody will get you that for Christmas. Myself I would be glad to have a nice WesMo or a Treiner. But I sure don't need one.

  17. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by deacon Mark
    Kind if of topic but a few years ago we had an African priest from Uganda visiting for 3 months during Christmas. He was completely amazed. He said in Uganda among the Christians they start thinking about Christmas for maybe 3 days before the 25th. He could not get over all the fuss in November.

    In the interest of Christmas buy a guitar get the one you like, probably nobody will get you that for Christmas. Myself I would be glad to have a nice WesMo or a Treiner. But I sure don't need one.
    A couple of points here:

    1. The term "Christian" seems to have become a word used very generally to mean "not Jewish" and "not Muslim" and "not <insert religion here>". In other words, the use of the word has become similar to the use of the term term "Kleenex" being used for any brand that does that function or "Xerox" for any brand of copier.
    2. The Christmas season is the time of year when retailers try to make the most of the already largest shopping season of the year. It was a real bonus when some bright soul thought up "Black Friday" and all the retailers jumped on the bandwagon. That concept extended the Christmas shopping season all the way back to Thanksgiving. From there, it was almost a no-brainer to extend it back to Halloween to make all the holidays, since they are so close together anyway, into one big shopping frenzy. Then, some bright soul came up with the idea of "Cyber Monday", so that the online retailers could have their day in the sun, completing the picture for the holiday shopping frenzy. In short, this is a very well planned marketing ploy that the consumer public gladly eats up.

    I volunteer teach English as a second language to immigrant folks, and find their perspectives on our culture to be quite insightful and most often perspectives I would not have considered because I am in the middle of it, like a fish not thinking living underwater as being weird.

    Tony

  18. #17

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  19. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by MarkRhodes
    Interesting read. It was the last two paragraphs that I was reflecting on, though admittedly I was not aware of the darker history farther back. From where I sit in ignorance of the long past that the term has, Black Friday suddenly appeared one year, and really took off in subsequent years. That would have been the tale told in the last two paragraphs.

    I am not surprised about some of the connections to a football game. It does seem this country has gone nuts over sports, to the point that the local news around my area is largely dominated by it instead of more important issues, the exception being public television and radio of course.

    Tony

  20. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by deacon Mark
    Kind if of topic but a few years ago we had an African priest from Uganda visiting for 3 months during Christmas. He was completely amazed. He said in Uganda among the Christians they start thinking about Christmas for maybe 3 days before the 25th. He could not get over all the fuss in November.
    Of course this was a very secular fuss, not a religious one, right? As an atheist, the distinction is clear to me.

    My favourite "holiday" season in recent years was the one my family spent in Japan. Japan is less than 1% Christian, so Christmas was a non-event. I think we we traveling on a train on that day.

  21. #20

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    Consider the Satanic Implications of a "Black Friday Telecaster"...

  22. #21

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    Quote Originally Posted by tbeltrans
    Interesting read. It was the last two paragraphs that I was reflecting on, though admittedly I was not aware of the darker history farther back. From where I sit in ignorance of the long past that the term has, Black Friday suddenly appeared one year, and really took off in subsequent years. That would have been the tale told in the last two paragraphs.
    I was born in 1958, so I was alive when the term came into (limited, local) use in 1961. Not that I heard it back then. It wasn't a big deal when I was a kid. I think one big reason for that is that many people were still shopping from catalogs (-Sears, et al). And lay-away was still a big deal. For that, one had to choose things early (-becuse you could do so with little money down and pay off the balance before Christmas). My mom did that for us. But it wasn't because the things were on sale.

    I think children's toys were a big driver of "Black Friday" when the term took off nationwide. Cabbage Patch Kids were one such item. Another was the Tickle-Me Elmo. It is my understanding that toy makers DELIBERATELY ran out of a hot toy in December to guarantee return visits to the store in January "when we get some more in." True or not, the fear that one's kid would not have that must-have toy worried many parents. Hence the mad-dash to get to the stores the first day they went on sale, otherwise the stores would run out and you couldn't get the toy at all.

    That stores will run out of items is a less pressing concern now. We've come to expect free shipping and quick delivery, so the idea that a store could sell all of something on, say, 29 November and not get any more in before Christmas just doesn't seem credible. (Though in some rare cases it might be true.)

    Also, I think there are more places to buy almost any particular item. This is why we're inundated with ads from every music-related place we've ever bought anything: they want us to pick them among the large group of online retailers we've dealt with in the past. And email is free, so I don't begrudge them this. (I just delete it all.)

  23. #22

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    Quote Originally Posted by rabbit
    Consider the Satanic Implications of a "Black Friday Telecaster"...

  24. #23

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    I received three Emails... All from Positive grid. I do not give out my Email addy without the supplier having a privacy / no share statement regarding junk Email.

    My last PAID for Email address I had since the 80's (earthlink.net) and a couple of years ago I gave it up because I received hundreds of spam Emails daily and Earthlink would not re-install their spam filters they had for years. I guess selling Email addresses is more profitable than paying clients.

  25. #24

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    Quote Originally Posted by MarkRhodes
    I was born in 1958, so I was alive when the term came into (limited, local) use in 1961. Not that I heard it back then. It wasn't a big deal when I was a kid. I think one big reason for that is that many people were still shopping from catalogs (-Sears, et al). And lay-away was still a big deal. For that, one had to choose things early (-becuse you could do so with little money down and pay off the balance before Christmas). My mom did that for us. But it wasn't because the things were on sale.

    I think children's toys were a big driver of "Black Friday" when the term took off nationwide. Cabbage Patch Kids were one such item. Another was the Tickle-Me Elmo. It is my understanding that toy makers DELIBERATELY ran out of a hot toy in December to guarantee return visits to the store in January "when we get some more in." True or not, the fear that one's kid would not have that must-have toy worried many parents. Hence the mad-dash to get to the stores the first day they went on sale, otherwise the stores would run out and you couldn't get the toy at all.

    That stores will run out of items is a less pressing concern now. We've come to expect free shipping and quick delivery, so the idea that a store could sell all of something on, say, 29 November and not get any more in before Christmas just doesn't seem credible. (Though in some rare cases it might be true.)

    Also, I think there are more places to buy almost any particular item. This is why we're inundated with ads from every music-related place we've ever bought anything: they want us to pick them among the large group of online retailers we've dealt with in the past. And email is free, so I don't begrudge them this. (I just delete it all.)
    Though I was born in 1953 (Hey! That just a couple of years ago ), I remember the term from probably sometime in the 1980s. As I recall Cabbage Patch dolls were a thing back then, because a niece who was quite young then, was really into that whole thing.

    When I was growing up, the Sears and Wards catalogs were a big deal. We kids would look at those toys for hours on end, trying to imagine what how they looked in real life, in our living room.

    I think you are right about the psychology of feeding the fear of running out of toys. I think I was going into first or second grade when we moved from New York to near San Francisco in California. When Silly Putty was a thing, I remember my Mom complaining that all the stores around were out of it and she had to drive all the way to San Jose to find some.

    My Dad had a program at work like a miniature 401k, except that it was for the current year, for saving for Christmas. He would have a fixed amount of money and would tell us how much he could spend per kid. With 10 of us, there wasn't a lot, but we never went without. We picked several items out of the Christmas catalog that fit what was budgeted, and then my parents would pick something from that list so it would still be a surprise.

    As for Black Friday, what surprised me was the fisticuffs at Walmart that made it into the mainstream media, not to mention the insanity of folks camping out in lines overnight especially here in a Minnesota winter! I don't participate in Black Friday, and find better deals on "the real good stuff" not during this time, but elsewhere during the year. I am often left with the impression that Black Friday is mostly a means for retailers to slag off the stuff that didn't sell well during the year, taking advantage of the mob effect generated by all that excitement.

    I can't imagine what Christmas must be like for kids today. It seems that many have smart phones, Apple tablets, and goodies far beyond anything we had. I doubt that we would have these things if I were growing up today because, with 10 kids, they simply would not be able to afford it. But, then, with the massive cultural changes over the years, maybe they would not have had 10 kids and I would have all that stuff. We will never know...

    Tony

  26. #25
    It's especially annoying when I get multiple messages from each vendor.

  27. #26

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    Quote Originally Posted by Woody Sound
    It's especially annoying when I get multiple messages from each vendor.
    Same here, but that's more to do with free email than Christmas. I delete more email than I read, year around, and most of it is from vendors offering deals (-back to school, sizzlin' summer, blah blah blah).

  28. #27

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    Quote Originally Posted by Woody Sound
    So I received around 50 or so BF ads in my email, and that was just today! JEEZ, ENOUGH ALREADY!!!
    Clearly, you're no fun!