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  1. #26

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    Quote Originally Posted by christianm77
    My latest thoughts; practicing with a metronome is not in fact working on your sense of time; actually it’s one way to learn to stop the guitar from taking up too much of your attention.
    Cory Wong finds the metronome useful in two ways. He talks about that beginning around 4:30


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    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #27

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    My latest thoughts; practicing with a metronome is not in fact working on your sense of time; actually it’s one way to learn to stop the guitar from taking up too much of your attention.
    I guess it is just what it is... jazz music has separate purely rythmic groove that is independent from harmonic/melodic rythmm.

    Metronome helps to keep that reference, nothing less nothing more ... I like using it only on 2 only... in 4/4... it is fun to make it swing.
    If I would put it on every beat - it seems like somebody is knocking on my head, 2 and 4 is better but still only 2 or only 4 is more fun...

    I also have an app where the tone sounds like a snare drum played with a brush.


    I never use it in classical music becasue there the rhythm is always connect with harmony... and to me metronome there is like it is disturbing into the music, ruining it.

  4. #28

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    I'll throw this into the mix. Starts getting fun at about 5:10.
    At 7:25 he moves the click to different beats.

  5. #29
    I like to use my drum machines as one man band thang at home. My Boss machine plays bass patterns for me my Alesis does not. If I add my bass octave to my guitar I can do a pretty fair imitation of a sixties power trio.IMHO But the real reason I decided to chime in is to tell JGO people that Victor wrote a paperback book about being a musician that has a different take then most. I dont remember the title but I think its obtainable for those who seek it out.Also Victors brother Reggie is a really top notch jazz guitarist on YT and is teaching in Nashville. Guitarists in Middle Tenn might wish to seek him out for quality instruction.

  6. #30

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    I
    Quote Originally Posted by Jonah
    I guess it is just what it is... jazz music has separate purely rythmic groove that is independent from harmonic/melodic rythmm.

    Metronome helps to keep that reference, nothing less nothing more ... I like using it only on 2 only... in 4/4... it is fun to make it swing.
    If I would put it on every beat - it seems like somebody is knocking on my head, 2 and 4 is better but still only 2 or only 4 is more fun...

    I also have an app where the tone sounds like a snare drum played with a brush.


    I never use it in classical music becasue there the rhythm is always connect with harmony... and to me metronome there is like it is disturbing into the music, ruining it.
    I’m not really talking about jazz here; Being able to play accurate upbeats and rhythmic language is kind of a seperate issue. I’m talking about just playing quarter notes with the pulse. But what is true of that is also true of more complex rhythms once you have developed your rhythmic vocabulary and beat placement.

    The point I was trying to make is that even something as simple as playing a major scale in quarters on guitar can put you off your time;

    and that if you foreground your pulse awareness by for instance counting out loud, you may find your performance improves; though you may well also find your guitar playing is a disaster haha (because it’s not 100% unconscious yet.)

    Try the experiment I talk about above and you may get an idea of what I mean. Ones inherent sense of pulse might be a lot better than what happens when one plays; the mechanics of playing can be a distraction from that pulse awareness.
    Last edited by christianm77; 05-11-2021 at 04:31 AM.

  7. #31

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    Quote Originally Posted by christianm77
    Some modern drummers are apparently incapable of keeping time without a click so it may help them.
    Doesn't "modern" music have more pre recorded stuff, electronic music elements etc., which has made playing drums "live" to a click much more common, and as a consequence some might find it difficult to get of the comfort zone they've gotten used to.
    Last edited by orri; 05-11-2021 at 08:03 AM.

  8. #32

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    Quote Originally Posted by steve burchfield
    I like to use my drum machines as one man band thang at home. My Boss machine plays bass patterns for me my Alesis does not. If I add my bass octave to my guitar I can do a pretty fair imitation of a sixties power trio.IMHO But the real reason I decided to chime in is to tell JGO people that Victor wrote a paperback book about being a musician that has a different take then most. I dont remember the title but I think its obtainable for those who seek it out.Also Victors brother Reggie is a really top notch jazz guitarist on YT and is teaching in Nashville. Guitarists in Middle Tenn might wish to seek him out for quality instruction.
    The book is 'The Music Lesson: A Spiritual Search for Growth Through Music ' and has a form of a novel with real world musicians behind main characters. Early chapters are about time feel. One of the characters is a drummer with his groove so strong that when he takes a solo he doesn't have to do anything but a long pause with a single cymbal strike.
    In his workshop Victor reveals it is about J.D.Blair. Very happy to find this -- the following is probably the most reliably uplifting musical video I've found in years
    Should have posted this to the funky thread:


  9. #33

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    Quote Originally Posted by orri
    Doesn't "modern" music have more pre recorded stuff, electronic music elements etc., which has made playing drums "live" to a click much more common, and as a consequence some might find it difficult to get of the comfort zone they've gotten used to.
    Exactly. It's a known thing that a lot of drummers who work a lot with a click exclusively tend (for example on a long running show) can to drag when the play without it, because they are used to sitting back in the pocket so much... Different skills.

  10. #34

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    "not quite my tempo"

    I own soundbrenner (v.1) and I don't use it. Tried several times, even with band synced on some venues. There are two problems:

    1. first of all I would say it is not yet "production ready". The metronome (at least first version I have) get lost with time sometimes. The result is that you will have shift which is to me not acceptable. I can imagine they improved this in the last version but mine is still working in the same way (so... cannot be used in pro situations due to distraction). Especially that if you have several soundbrenners to sync and they are in fact desynced...

    2. it's not easy to use it - because it's on elastic band or maybe because the body is moving during the playing you need to learn to use it. And somehow I had impression that I don't feel the "click" precisely. Also each time you put this on you are using different stripe strength so it is more or less felt. The new version is treated as watch but for guitar I've found hand the less accurate place to put this. I was using this on chest and this was the best place for me to "feel it right".

    In general the idea is super brilliant. I've played on band where all rhythm section had it (drums, bass, guitar, piano), synced and we have used playlists. It's super easy to switch between tunes without waiting for drummer to give the tempo. But the reality is that it's not working as expected and for the value it's overpriced imho...

  11. #35

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    This has given me the idea for a new concept, the ‘Rhythm Chair’ for guitarists. You sit down, plug in, set the tempo, and if you stray from the selected BPM, it lets you know in a way you can’t ignore.

    Wearable Metronome-9b6e7753-a386-4be5-9cf8-02cfb9b58fd7-jpeg