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  1. #1

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    Hi Everybody,

    It's been a while. Life got busy. I pretty much gave up on getting a Gibson or Epiphone Howard Roberts Custom due to the cost, and the neck profile of that guitar (more on on that shortly), and my Gretsch Country Club went bye-by, for a Gibson ES-137. That ended up being a flop, when 3 months ago, I got rid of it by using it as trading material for a Fender American Original Jazzmaster (which has a nice, Medium C neck on it), due to me just not liking the Slim Taper neck on my ES-137. I may have mentioned this in the past, when I was more active in this forum, but I'll reiterate it - as I've gotten older, I've found that I prefer, chunkier/fatter necks. I've always played in the classical style with my thumb behind the neck, and thin necks make my left/fretting hand feel like it's trying to sort of act like a C-clamp - not fun! I put up with thinner necks up until about 10 years ago (after all, I'd read for ages in guitar magazines how slim necks were more comfortable playing-wise, and were more suitable for playing - especially lead guitar), when I bought a Tele with a chunkier neck to try for a period of time, and realized that I loved how the neck felt and played, and that I didn't have to put up with thin necks.

    Unfortunately, a lot of searching needs to be done to find electric guitars in general that don't thin necks since the majority of them do, and oftentimes, what is considered thick by some players, doesn't even classify as a Medium C neck (which is about the thinnest neck I'll put up with). Still, I have been able to find soldibodies with adequately thick necks, that don't cost ridiculous amounts of money (my recently purchased American Original Jazzmaster is a case in point). Hollowbodies and Semi-Hollowbodies though, have been frustrating to say the least. In retrospect, I wish I hadn't had to sell my early '54 Gretsch Country Club, 3 plus years ago, due to a money crunch. Every other F-hole guitar I've had since then, has gone bye bye, because I just haven't cared for their at best, slim taper necks (my ES-137 lasted the longest, due to me attempting to just put up with the 60s slim taper neck it had). So, I ask the forum members, does anybody know of any hollow or semi-hollowbody guitars with a Medium C neck or thicker? Slim taper, and thinner necks need not apply. I'm open to any, and all brands that are decent quality guitars. At the present time, my upper price limit is around $1200. Also, as a long shot - bonus points if it's a 7-string hollow or semi-hollow (I've played 7-string guitar off and on for over 10 years), though I'm not holding my breath on that. The Eastmans go for way more than I can afford, and I waited too long to get an Ibanez AFJ-957 (they've been discontinued, and I will admit that I prefer 7-strings with at least a 25.5" scale length).

    Thanks!
    Ellen
    Last edited by EllenGtrGrl; 11-26-2019 at 12:39 PM.

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  3. #2

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    Hey Ellen -- welcome back!

    Another option, especially since you like Fender-style gits, is to look for a Warmoth tele (solid or semi-hollow -- they're all great for jazz!) with one of their bigger necks. Here's one on Reverb, for example, with their "boat" neck, with is a thicker style [Note: NO affiliation with Seller!]. This particular one is less than half your budget, too! G & L also makes semi-hollow tele's with larger necks (if you order one), so check your local dealer.

    Otherwise, aside from custom/boutique guitars, I can't think of any company that makes standard, thicker necks.

    Happy hunting, and let us know what you find!

    Marc

  4. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by marcwhy View Post
    Hey Ellen -- welcome back!

    Another option, especially since you like Fender-style gits, is to look for a Warmoth tele (solid or semi-hollow -- they're all great for jazz!) with one of their bigger necks. Here's one on Reverb, for example, with their "boat" neck, with is a thicker style [Note: NO affiliation with Seller!]. This particular one is less than half your budget, too! G & L also makes semi-hollow tele's with larger necks (if you order one), so check your local dealer.

    Otherwise, aside from custom/boutique guitars, I can't think of any company that makes standard, thicker necks.

    Happy hunting, and let us know what you find!

    Marc
    Hi Marc,

    Fenders are pretty good (and I love my American Original Jazzmaster), but I've gone the Tele Thinline route in the past, and while they were great guitars, I will admit that I gravitate towards archtops, since for most of my almost 41 years of playing, I've played semi-hollow, and hollow archtop guitars as my main electric guitars (in the 90s, I even gigged in a heavy rock band with a Gibson Howard Roberts Fusion, and from 2002 to 2016 I was a Gretsch nut, who played mainly Country Clubs). It may be a long shot in my price range, but I'd love to have another 17" archtop (like my Country Clubs were) - just with thicker neck than the ones I had in the past. I like the way they feel to me playability-wise. I pick from the wrist, and the larger body, makes for an oh so nice arm rest for me. They also have a wonderful, full bodied sound. I've even at times contemplated an 18" archtop, though that may be a bit too much size-wise for me.

    Would a Peerless Monarch possibly meet my requirements? It has a 17" body, and from what I've found online, Peerless guitars have Medium C necks (somebody correct me if I am wrong)?

    Ellen

  5. #4

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    Would you like something with a VERY big neck? Happy to add a floating or set-in pickup.
    "Somebody get me out of this chair." - BOB WILLS
    Hammertone is a registered Hofnerologist.

  6. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hammertone View Post
    Would you like something with a VERY big neck? Happy to add a floating or set-in pickup.

    VERY cool! Earlier Gretsches have seriously chunky necks. My late '53/early '54 Country Club (which in retrospect, I shouldn't have gotten rid of) certainly did, but I think I'd prefer to have a cutaway.

    Ellen

  7. #6

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    Godin 5th Avenue necks are pretty chunky C's. All the variants use the same neck.

    Gibson 335's with the 58/59 neck shapes are also quite chunky. I had a Les Paul with this shape for a long time.

    My D'Angelico semi-hollow's neck somewhere is a little slimmer and more D-shaped than my Godin or a Gibson 58 shape, but definitely chunkier than the Gibson slim-taper '60 shape (a friend of mine has one of those in his 335, so i know this through direct comparison).

    John

  8. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by John A. View Post
    Godin 5th Avenue necks are pretty chunky C's. All the variants use the same neck.

    Gibson 335's with the 58/59 neck shapes are also quite chunky. I had a Les Paul with this shape for a long time.

    My D'Angelico semi-hollow's neck somewhere is a little slimmer and more D-shaped than my Godin or a Gibson 58 shape, but definitely chunkier than the Gibson slim-taper '60 shape (a friend of mine has one of those in his 335, so i know this through direct comparison).

    John
    How does the Godin neck compare to the '335 with a 58/59 neck profile (I've know about those 335s for some time, but they're a bit out of my price range)? It's been a very long time since I played a 5th Avenue. Also, sound-wise, which do you prefer, the ones with the P90s, or the ones with humbuckers?

    Ellen

  9. #8

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    "I'm open to any, and all brands that are decent quality guitars. At the present time, my upper price limit is around $1200. Also, as a long shot - bonus points if it's a 7-string (I've played 7-string guitar off and on for over 10 years), though I'm not holding my breath on that. The Eastmans go for way more than I can afford, and I waited too long to get an Ibanez AFJ-957 (they've been discontinued, and I will admit that I prefer 7-strings with at least a 25.5" scale length)."
    How about one of these:
    W



    All three are within your budget, and are completely handmade by Polis luthier Marek Witkowski, with scale lengths in excess of 25.5".
    "Somebody get me out of this chair." - BOB WILLS
    Hammertone is a registered Hofnerologist.

  10. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hammertone View Post
    "I'm open to any, and all brands that are decent quality guitars. At the present time, my upper price limit is around $1200. Also, as a long shot - bonus points if it's a 7-string (I've played 7-string guitar off and on for over 10 years), though I'm not holding my breath on that. The Eastmans go for way more than I can afford, and I waited too long to get an Ibanez AFJ-957 (they've been discontinued, and I will admit that I prefer 7-strings with at least a 25.5" scale length)."
    How about one of these:
    W



    All three are within your budget, and are completely handmade by Polis luthier Marek Witkowski, with scale lengths in excess of 25.5".
    Nice!! The thing is, I'm not sure if I want another 7-string Superstrat. I'm kind of looking for something rarer - a 7-string archtop. The problem is, that the few that are available, cost quite a bit more than I can afford,

  11. #10

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    How about this - a carved top/carved back Hoyer Solist with a big neck and a 24 3/4" scale. 16 1/2" wide. Full depth, Excellent playing condition. I used to own this guitar, know it well and would be happy to arrange for you to buy it. It's a superb instrument.

    "Somebody get me out of this chair." - BOB WILLS
    Hammertone is a registered Hofnerologist.

  12. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by EllenGtrGrl View Post
    How does the Godin neck compare to the '335 with a 58/59 neck profile (I've know about those 335s for some time, but they're a bit out of my price range)? It's been a very long time since I played a 5th Avenue. Also, sound-wise, which do you prefer, the ones with the P90s, or the ones with humbuckers?

    Ellen
    I'd say the Godin is a similar profile to the chunky Gibson, except it's a flatter fingerboard radius, maybe a little thinner at the lower frets. I have a P90 pickup. I've tried one of the humbucker ones, but it has been a while, so I don't remember it particularly well.

    John

  13. #12

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    I suggest you try a seventy seven guitar - they have quite chunky necks and guaranteed excellent quality.

  14. #13

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    hey ellen...haven't seen you around here or gdp in long while...check out the new guilds..the 175 or the savoy...they have u shaped necks...vintage clubby..and right at your price point

    here's neck shape breakdown for those that need to know

    https://www.fender.com/articles/tech...ape-is-for-you

    cheers

  15. #14

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    I’ll second the Seventy Seven idea. I would not call the neck on my Exrubato Jazz “chunky”, but perhaps “substantial”, especially in combination with the 1.75” nut with. Not terribly easy to find them used, but great deals can be had now and then. One of our forum members has an Exrubato Hollow for sale on Reverb for a bit more than your budget.

  16. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by EllenGtrGrl View Post
    Hi Marc,

    Would a Peerless Monarch possibly meet my requirements? It has a 17" body, and from what I've found online, Peerless guitars have Medium C necks (somebody correct me if I am wrong)?

    Ellen
    i had a monarch that had a pretty chunky neck. I remember Lou at guitars n jazz said their necks varied quite a bit. Give him a call. Peerless is tough to beat at the price point.

  17. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by neatomic View Post
    hey ellen...haven't seen you around here or gdp in long while...check out the new guilds..the 175 or the savoy...they have u shaped necks...vintage clubby..and right at your price point

    here's neck shape breakdown for those that need to know

    https://www.fender.com/articles/tech...ape-is-for-you

    cheers
    Wow! Longtime no see Neatomic! Yeah, I'm kind of Gretschless nowadays. I considered an X-175, but then I read a comment in the TDPRI forum, where one of the members said he thought the neck was kind of dinky (though admittedly, for more than a few TDPRIers, if it isn't a Nocaster neck, they think it's small). If that's not really the case, then it will once again, get serious consideration from me. I've read some good reveiws about the X-175s. And, it it has a 17" lower bout like my Country Clubs had, which definitely is a plus in my book.

    Ellen


    Ellen

  18. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by skiboyny View Post
    i had a monarch that had a pretty chunky neck. I remember Lou at guitars n jazz said their necks varied quite a bit. Give him a call. Peerless is tough to beat at the price point.
    Hmm, I didn't know about the variation neck size-wise, but it's still good info. to know. Thanks.

    Ellen

  19. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by wzpgsr View Post
    I’ll second the Seventy Seven idea. I would not call the neck on my Exrubato Jazz “chunky”, but perhaps “substantial”, especially in combination with the 1.75” nut with. Not terribly easy to find them used, but great deals can be had now and then. One of our forum members has an Exrubato Hollow for sale on Reverb for a bit more than your budget.
    I did some online info dogging, and the Seventy Seven guitars, look very good. The price of them, is kind of iffy for me at the present time.

    Like I said I don't need a baseball bat neck - just a neck with some heft to it. After all my old 60s Baja Tele, and my current American Original Jazzmaster's neck aren't or weren't baseball bats neck-wise, but they're very comfortable for me playing-wise.

    Hmmm, I might want to just step back for a while, think on this, and save my pennies some more.

    Ellen

  20. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by EllenGtrGrl View Post
    I did some online info dogging, and the Seventy Seven guitars, look very good. The price of them, is kind of iffy for me at the present time.

    Like I said I don't need a baseball bat neck - just a neck with some heft to it. After all my old 60s Baja Tele, and my current American Original Jazzmaster's neck aren't or weren't baseball bats neck-wise, but they're very comfortable for me playing-wise.

    Hmmm, I might want to just step back for a while, think on this, and save my pennies some more.

    Ellen
    Check your direct messages, Ellen. I just sent you one.

  21. #20

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  22. #21

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    Quote Originally Posted by EllenGtrGrl View Post
    .... I considered an X-175, but then I read a comment in the TDPRI forum, where one of the members said he thought the neck was kind of dinky .... If that's not really the case, then it will once again, get serious consideration from me. ...
    Don't waste your time. The neck is dinky.
    "Somebody get me out of this chair." - BOB WILLS
    Hammertone is a registered Hofnerologist.

  23. #22

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    My early Aria Pro ii Herb Ellis had a pretty chunky neck on it, though maybe not as wide as what you need. I just picked up a surprisingly solid Indonesian made Cort Source (335). It has a more fender like sort of D profile with a flatter back, not as deep as a classical Im guessing. I will make some measurements on that.

  24. #23

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    Huh, you must be my "guitar neck preference twin"...

    I also play 7-string (a Chapman ML7T - chunkiest solidbody 7-string with a 26.5" scale I could find), and I also like chunky necks (chunky to me means AT LEAST 0.9"/22mm thickness at the first fret - most of the guitars mentioned here in this thread are not even close!); what makes it worse is that I'd like my necks to be both chunky AND have a 1-3/4" nut width - and that's even more rare (my favorite neck is on a partscaster Tele, with a roasted maple neck with 1-3/4" nut, and their Fatback profile - which is 1" thick at the 1st fret).

    I wouldnt classify the Godin 5th Ave neck as chunky at all - it's kind of middle-of-the-road, thickness-wise; kind of a hard-shouldered D shape, with a flat back; not Ibanez/Gibson slim taper thin, but not thicker than your average Gretsch neck.
    The comment about the Guild X175 reissue on TDPRI might have come from me - I tried those a couple of times when they came out a few years ago with their Newark St series, loved the look and tone, but hated the necks, not only were they narrow, but also thin - maybe that has changed when Guild ownershipvwent from Fender to Cordoba? Haven't tried one in recent times...
    Every single modern Gretsch I tried (proline and Electromatic) had a small/thin neck - never had a chance to try a vintage one, supposedly the VS '53 Duo Jet has a slightly thicker neck, but from the specs I've seen, I'd also classify it as middle-of-the-road...

    The only archtop I own with a real chunky neck is my Loar LH300 - it has a thickness of 23mm (slightly more than 0.9") at the 1st fret, AND it also has a 1-3/4" nut width. The profile is a soft V, which might take some time to get used to; I only wished it has bigger frets instead of the tiny vintage-sized ones, and that it had better fretwork in general, sound-wise it is great; I electrified mine with a floating CC-style pickup, but there's also the (discontinued) LH309 version, with a P90 (most of the other Loars with pickups & cutaways have smaller necks!)

    I also have an Epiphone Zephyr John Lee Hooker LTD reissue that just meets my 22mm at the first fret requirements - but it doesn't have a 1-3/4" neck (1-11/16"); it's a 17" thinline hollowbody; this one might actually meet your requirements if you're not looking for a traditional jazz-box.

    Something I've never had a chance to try is an old, pre-60s Harmony or Silvertone, like an H62 or Espanada - they are supposed to have super-chunky and wide necks, unfortunately, over here they are rare, and most of them need quite a bit of TLC to get them playable; if you're in the US, you should be able to find one in your price range, I think...

    Good luck on your hunt - report back if you find something that meets your criteria! Me, I'm hoping for a lottery win, so that I can have a luthier build me a 16" thinline archtop with 7 strings, Bareknuckle P90s, and a 26.5" scale neck that's 1" thick from nut to heel...

    OK, here are my two chunky neckers...:


  25. #24

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    Sounds like a seventy seven guitar might suit you. Here's a recent clip of mine.


  26. #25

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    Quote Originally Posted by RomanS View Post
    Huh, you must be my "guitar neck preference twin"...

    I also play 7-string (a Chapman ML7T - chunkiest solidbody 7-string with a 26.5" scale I could find), and I also like chunky necks (chunky to me means AT LEAST 0.9"/22mm thickness at the first fret - most of the guitars mentioned here in this thread are not even close!); what makes it worse is that I'd like my necks to be both chunky AND have a 1-3/4" nut width - and that's even more rare (my favorite neck is on a partscaster Tele, with a roasted maple neck with 1-3/4" nut, and their Fatback profile - which is 1" thick at the 1st fret).

    I wouldnt classify the Godin 5th Ave neck as chunky at all - it's kind of middle-of-the-road, thickness-wise; kind of a hard-shouldered D shape, with a flat back; not Ibanez/Gibson slim taper thin, but not thicker than your average Gretsch neck.
    The comment about the Guild X175 reissue on TDPRI might have come from me - I tried those a couple of times when they came out a few years ago with their Newark St series, loved the look and tone, but hated the necks, not only were they narrow, but also thin - maybe that has changed when Guild ownershipvwent from Fender to Cordoba? Haven't tried one in recent times...
    Every single modern Gretsch I tried (proline and Electromatic) had a small/thin neck - never had a chance to try a vintage one, supposedly the VS '53 Duo Jet has a slightly thicker neck, but from the specs I've seen, I'd also classify it as middle-of-the-road...

    The only archtop I own with a real chunky neck is my Loar LH300 - it has a thickness of 23mm (slightly more than 0.9") at the 1st fret, AND it also has a 1-3/4" nut width. The profile is a soft V, which might take some time to get used to; I only wished it has bigger frets instead of the tiny vintage-sized ones, and that it had better fretwork in general, sound-wise it is great; I electrified mine with a floating CC-style pickup, but there's also the (discontinued) LH309 version, with a P90 (most of the other Loars with pickups & cutaways have smaller necks!)

    I also have an Epiphone Zephyr John Lee Hooker LTD reissue that just meets my 22mm at the first fret requirements - but it doesn't have a 1-3/4" neck (1-11/16"); it's a 17" thinline hollowbody; this one might actually meet your requirements if you're not looking for a traditional jazz-box.

    Something I've never had a chance to try is an old, pre-60s Harmony or Silvertone, like an H62 or Espanada - they are supposed to have super-chunky and wide necks, unfortunately, over here they are rare, and most of them need quite a bit of TLC to get them playable; if you're in the US, you should be able to find one in your price range, I think...

    Good luck on your hunt - report back if you find something that meets your criteria! Me, I'm hoping for a lottery win, so that I can have a luthier build me a 16" thinline archtop with 7 strings, Bareknuckle P90s, and a 26.5" scale neck that's 1" thick from nut to heel...

    OK, here are my two chunky neckers...:

    Those are CHONKY!

    I like thick necks and I cannot lie...

    My experience: anything from Korea is very similar—smallish C profile. That includes the Epi JP and Peerless Sunset I’ve owned. The Godins are all the same and also fairly narrow.

    Historically Harmonys and Kays have had thick V-neck profiles. I have a ‘64 Brilliant Cutaway which is a C profile and narrower, but still wider than the above. The problem with older Harmonys/Kays is neck bend and a lack of playability, but my BC is perfect.

    Hollow Body and Semi-Hollowbody Guitars - Ugh!!! I'm Stuck!-276fae0a-8363-4552-a988-d71f4327794a-jpg

    Have you looked at a Fender Starcaster? I have been jonesing for one lately. They are semi-hollow. They look to have a thick neck, but the best part is that the neck is bolt-on, so you could change it out for a Warmoth etc if you want to. I’m not sure they have the cool retro SC headstock, but they certainly have fat necks. There are a ton of SCs on Reverb. The Fender Squiers look pretty good quality as well.
    “Without music, life would be a mistake”--Friedrich Nietzsche

    Current lineup: Gibson ES-135 ('02), Peerless Sunset, Harmony Brilliant Cutaway ('64), Godin 5th Avenue, Alvarez AC60 A/E classical, Kay K37 ('56), Fender Squier VM Jazz bass, several ukes. Amps: Fishman Artist, Fender SCXD, Pignose 7-100.

  27. #26

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    Quote Originally Posted by omphalopsychos View Post
    VERY cool, but waaaaaayy more than I can afford. At the present time, I can maybe spend $1200, so yeah, my options may be a little limited.

    Ellen

  28. #27

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    Quote Originally Posted by wzpgsr View Post
    Check your direct messages, Ellen. I just sent you one.
    Message looked at - right now Seventy Sevens are a little out of my price range, but they look like nice guitars.

  29. #28

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    Quote Originally Posted by RomanS View Post
    Huh, you must be my "guitar neck preference twin"...

    I also play 7-string (a Chapman ML7T - chunkiest solidbody 7-string with a 26.5" scale I could find), and I also like chunky necks (chunky to me means AT LEAST 0.9"/22mm thickness at the first fret - most of the guitars mentioned here in this thread are not even close!); what makes it worse is that I'd like my necks to be both chunky AND have a 1-3/4" nut width - and that's even more rare (my favorite neck is on a partscaster Tele, with a roasted maple neck with 1-3/4" nut, and their Fatback profile - which is 1" thick at the 1st fret).

    I wouldnt classify the Godin 5th Ave neck as chunky at all - it's kind of middle-of-the-road, thickness-wise; kind of a hard-shouldered D shape, with a flat back; not Ibanez/Gibson slim taper thin, but not thicker than your average Gretsch neck.
    The comment about the Guild X175 reissue on TDPRI might have come from me - I tried those a couple of times when they came out a few years ago with their Newark St series, loved the look and tone, but hated the necks, not only were they narrow, but also thin - maybe that has changed when Guild ownershipvwent from Fender to Cordoba? Haven't tried one in recent times...
    Every single modern Gretsch I tried (proline and Electromatic) had a small/thin neck - never had a chance to try a vintage one, supposedly the VS '53 Duo Jet has a slightly thicker neck, but from the specs I've seen, I'd also classify it as middle-of-the-road...

    The only archtop I own with a real chunky neck is my Loar LH300 - it has a thickness of 23mm (slightly more than 0.9") at the 1st fret, AND it also has a 1-3/4" nut width. The profile is a soft V, which might take some time to get used to; I only wished it has bigger frets instead of the tiny vintage-sized ones, and that it had better fretwork in general, sound-wise it is great; I electrified mine with a floating CC-style pickup, but there's also the (discontinued) LH309 version, with a P90 (most of the other Loars with pickups & cutaways have smaller necks!)

    I also have an Epiphone Zephyr John Lee Hooker LTD reissue that just meets my 22mm at the first fret requirements - but it doesn't have a 1-3/4" neck (1-11/16"); it's a 17" thinline hollowbody; this one might actually meet your requirements if you're not looking for a traditional jazz-box.

    Something I've never had a chance to try is an old, pre-60s Harmony or Silvertone, like an H62 or Espanada - they are supposed to have super-chunky and wide necks, unfortunately, over here they are rare, and most of them need quite a bit of TLC to get them playable; if you're in the US, you should be able to find one in your price range, I think...

    Good luck on your hunt - report back if you find something that meets your criteria! Me, I'm hoping for a lottery win, so that I can have a luthier build me a 16" thinline archtop with 7 strings, Bareknuckle P90s, and a 26.5" scale neck that's 1" thick from nut to heel...

    OK, here are my two chunky neckers...:


    Roman5, I think you are the one who said the Guild X-175 you tried out, had a tiny neck on the TDPRI. I don't want to go there again, having played through college in the 1980s, an original Les Paul Signature (basically a 335, with a Les Paul Shaped lower cutaway), that had the infamous "Speed Neck" that so many Gibson hollow and semi-hollowbodies had in 70s. That neck was cramped to say the least! But at the time, I had been playing guitar for less than a decade, so I didn't know any better - I figured you just had to put up with it. Oh and like you, while a 25.5" scale length for a 7-string is OK, I prefer the 26.5" scale length (which the PRS SE Seven I briefly had [and got rid of due to its wide-thin neck [sorry, the neck width didn't compensate enough for its being thin], and my old Schecter Omen Ectreme 7 had). There is one exception to the rule though - if I could get my hands on another Schecter Jazz 7, I could be perfectly happy with its 25.5" scale length. That guitar (like many Schecter 7-strings made up until about 2010 or 2010) had a pretty chunky neck! I wish I hadn't had to sell it 5 years ago, due to being broke! I'd love to have another one, but they're pretty rare. Schecter only made them in 2000.

    My Old Schecter Jazz 7 The Day It Was Delivered at My Workplace (I've had bad experiences with home delivery, so I prefer things to be delivered at work)



    I didn't even know about the Reissue John Lee Hooker Zephyr. That is very intriguing. I could possibly get into that one, especially considering that my grandpa (Guitar Generation #1 in the family - along with playing guitar, he was also a luthier [he made me my first guitar]) use to play a 1940s Epiphone Emperor in dance bands. As for The Loar - I briefly tried one out, a couple of years ago. It seemed OK, but are there still quality issues with The Loar guitars?

    Ellen
    Last edited by EllenGtrGrl; 11-24-2019 at 09:39 PM.

  30. #29

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    Can't comment on Loar quality issues - mine is the only one I ever tried. No problems with the finish (which is sometimes mentioned), but the frets could have needed a dressing right when it came new (and there's not much to work with, as those are small vintage-size frets).
    But it does sound great, and I love the neck.
    That model is currently not in production, anyway, AFAIK...

  31. #30

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    Quote Originally Posted by Doctor Jeff View Post
    Those are CHONKY!

    I like thick necks and I cannot lie...

    My experience: anything from Korea is very similar—smallish C profile. That includes the Epi JP and Peerless Sunset I’ve owned. The Godins are all the same and also fairly narrow.

    Historically Harmonys and Kays have had thick V-neck profiles. I have a ‘64 Brilliant Cutaway which is a C profile and narrower, but still wider than the above. The problem with older Harmonys/Kays is neck bend and a lack of playability, but my BC is perfect.

    Hollow Body and Semi-Hollowbody Guitars - Ugh!!! I'm Stuck!-276fae0a-8363-4552-a988-d71f4327794a-jpg

    Have you looked at a Fender Starcaster? I have been jonesing for one lately. They are semi-hollow. They look to have a thick neck, but the best part is that the neck is bolt-on, so you could change it out for a Warmoth etc if you want to. I’m not sure they have the cool retro SC headstock, but they certainly have fat necks. There are a ton of SCs on Reverb. The Fender Squiers look pretty good quality as well.
    Thanks for the additional Peerless info. I think I might steer clear of them. As for a Starcaster - I had the opportunity to play an original one about 28 years ago, and a current version one. I'm going off of my memory, but the original ones had marginally thicker necks than the current ones. The current one I tried was an MIC model about a year or two ago, and I though its neck was a little thin. Still they are cool guitars.

    Ellen

  32. #31

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    Quote Originally Posted by RomanS View Post
    Can't comment on Loar quality issues - mine is the only one I ever tried. No problems with the finish (which is sometimes mentioned), but the frets could have needed a dressing right when it came new (and there's not much to work with, as those are small vintage-size frets).
    But it does sound great, and I love the neck.
    That model is currently not in production, anyway, AFAIK...
    Thanks for the info. As for small frets - those are no big deal, and narrower necks are not the end of the world for me - up to a point. I can deal with necks as narrow as the necks my Ric 360s used to have (about 1.63"/41mm),as long as the neck isn't thin. Below that neck width? No thank you, I'll pass.

  33. #32

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    The top Korean Ibanez semi .. Is it AS153? .. Something like that anyways. It has a nice neck on the chunky side .. Should be able to get one of those used within your budget

  34. #33

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    Consider a Warmoth partscaster.
    All sorts of neck size/shape and fret options.
    All sorts of body options - hollow mooncaster, chambered strat or tele, and so forth
    Lots of hardware and finishing options from which to choose and you'll get a guitar that does what you want, with a neck that you want, for under $1,200.
    I'd be happy to walk you through this anytime, as would some of the other members here - I've put together a pile of them because Fender simply doesn't make any necks in the sizes I prefer.
    "Somebody get me out of this chair." - BOB WILLS
    Hammertone is a registered Hofnerologist.

  35. #34

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    For a high quality, thick neck semi-hollow, you might consider the Ibanez EKM100 (Eric Krasno) model.

    EKM100 | EKM | HOLLOW BODIES | PRODUCTS | Ibanez guitars

    Ibanez EKM100 | Vintage Guitar(R) magazine

    Also, their Scofield model has a fairly chunky neck, but less so than the Krasno.

    JSM100 | JSM | HOLLOW BODIES | PRODUCTS | Ibanez guitars

  36. #35

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    Quote Originally Posted by RomanS View Post

    I wouldnt classify the Godin 5th Ave neck as chunky at all - it's kind of middle-of-the-road, thickness-wise; kind of a hard-shouldered D shape, with a flat back; not Ibanez/Gibson slim taper thin, but not thicker than your average Gretsch neck.
    Gotta' disagree here. As a Gretsch owner, I can say the Godin 5th neck is definitely and noticeably chunkier than the Grestch neck. The Godin was big enough I wondered if I would get on with it, over time. I think the Godins are definitely worth the OP's time in trying to find one to play.

  37. #36

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gitfiddler View Post
    For a high quality, thick neck semi-hollow, you might consider the Ibanez EKM100 (Eric Krasno) model.

    EKM100 | EKM | HOLLOW BODIES | PRODUCTS | Ibanez guitars

    Ibanez EKM100 | Vintage Guitar(R) magazine

    Also, their Scofield model has a fairly chunky neck, but less so than the Krasno.

    JSM100 | JSM | HOLLOW BODIES | PRODUCTS | Ibanez guitars
    Ibanez was actually the first guitar brand I considered, when I started looking into getting another archtop hollow or semi-hollow. I've had a couple in the past that were nice guitars: an Artcore AS73 from 2005 to 2008; and an Artstar AS120 for most of 2009. It's great that the Ibanez website lists (and even shows pictorially) the neck dimensions for each model. I wish more websites did so (Washburn for instance - I used to play Washburn acoustics years ago, and I'd give their electrics more consideration, if they went to the trouble of posting the neck dimensions of their guitars). That in mind, the JSH100 Schofield model has a little thinner neck (20.5mm at the 1st fret, vs 21mm for the Artcore and Artstar models) than I normally like. I LOVE the Krasno's specs, but the price seriously gives me pause. I am almost considering as a fallback an Artcore, or better yet an Artstar, due to my previous good history (albeit more than 10 years ago) with Ibanez semi-hollowbodies, but that's going to be a throw of the dice - it's been my experience that occasionally the Artcores and Artstars have enough manufacturing variation in their neck dimensions, to make more than a few of their necks too thin for my taste. It would be best for me to try some out, but Ibanez archtops are not as common around here as the Ibanez super-strats.

    Oh Well,
    Ellen

  38. #37

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    Quote Originally Posted by Lobomov View Post
    The top Korean Ibanez semi .. Is it AS153? .. Something like that anyways. It has a nice neck on the chunky side .. Should be able to get one of those used within your budget
    The AS-153 is one of my fall-back guitars.

  39. #38

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    I tell you!!! It's dangerous to be on vacation (for the first time in my working career, I have 4 weeks of vacation for the year, so I took off the Tuesday and Wednesday before Thanksgving). It's given me time to reflect even more on the issue. OK, time to shoot myself in the foot:

    Due to playing Gretsch Country Clubs for several years (2008 to 2017), I've gotten spoiled. I've come to a definite realization today that I not only want an archtop with at least a Medium C neck in thickness, I definitely want it to be a hollowbody, and have 17" lower bout (like my Country Clubs were). I'm also pretty sure that I want a body depth of 2.5" (again, like my Country Clubs) or deeper. I've just made things harder for myself, but I guess I don't want to settle for substitutes anymore. By the same token though, there is NO WAY that I can afford to get a custom made guitar.

    Ellen
    Last edited by EllenGtrGrl; 11-26-2019 at 06:52 PM.

  40. #39

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    I think you need a Gretsch Country Club....
    Jazz, Funk, Soul & Boogaloo: My group | Listen to Hip Jazz a Go Go! | Jazz, Soul, Blues: Eva La Voix

  41. #40

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    Or perhaps a Gretsch G5422T, it’s much more affordable but has a 2.75” body depth, double cutaway and the Gretschy features you are looking for (don’t know about neck thickness though):

    Jazz, Funk, Soul & Boogaloo: My group | Listen to Hip Jazz a Go Go! | Jazz, Soul, Blues: Eva La Voix

  42. #41

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    So the specifications are:

    -Archtop hollowbody with
    cutaway

    -17” lower bout
    -2.5” rim depth or greater
    -medium C neck or bigger

    -1.75" wide nut preferred. Gretsch Country Club nut width is 1.6875 | 1&11/16"
    -25.5" scale, which is the Gretsch Country Club scale length
    -$1,200 or less
    Last edited by Hammertone; 11-27-2019 at 02:56 PM.
    "Somebody get me out of this chair." - BOB WILLS
    Hammertone is a registered Hofnerologist.

  43. #42

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    Quote Originally Posted by Little Jay View Post
    I think you need a Gretsch Country Club....
    I can't afford one nowadays. They typically run over $2000. Also, I will admit that there were times I found the necks on my 2011, and my '59 Reissue to be a little thin. The days of finding a never sold, left over 2003 Country Club (like the one one I bought in 2008 - it's the guitar in my Avatar photo) for $1500 are gone. Also, despite the fact that the trestle bracing in the bodies of the oh so expensive '59 Reissues fights feedback pretty well (the trestle bracing makes the '59 Reissues more like semi-hollows, than hollowbodies), it makes them weigh a ton! If I ever got a Country Club again, I would probably replace the FilterTrons, with TV Classic Pluses, or PowerTrons. For some reason, FitlerTrons always leave me feeling underwhelmed. I'd also make the Bigsby go bye-bye.

    I would also consider a Synchromatic G6040. There's one for sale on Reverb at the present time that I could afford, but it has repairs to cracks in its top. Oooh, not so sure. Some repairs (like the headstock repair that the Howard Roberts Fusion I played through most of the 90s had - it was my main gigging guitar) are very good, others are not. Also, I've never played a 6040, so I'm not sure what the neck is like.

    Gretsch G6040 Synchromatic


    Ellen
    Last edited by EllenGtrGrl; 11-27-2019 at 02:40 PM.

  44. #43

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    Quote Originally Posted by Little Jay View Post
    Or perhaps a Gretsch G5422T, it’s much more affordable but has a 2.75” body depth, double cutaway and the Gretschy features you are looking for (don’t know about neck thickness though):

    Is that stock? I'm pretty sure that G5422s (which are Electromatics, not Pro Lines), never came with FilterTrons stock. It looks like somebody put in a set of TV Jones TV Classics. Nah, I've had other Gretsch models, and the ones that do it for me are the Country Clubs. Also, I really do not like Bigsbys. They're a pain to re-string, and like just about every other vibrato I've ever had on a guitar, I hardly ever used them, making them a waste for me.

  45. #44

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hammertone View Post
    So the specifications are:

    -Archtop hollowbody with
    cutaway

    -17” lower bout
    -2.5” rim depth or greater
    -medium C neck or bigger

    -1.75" wide nut preferred
    -$1,200 or less

    Scale length?
    Not as critical to me. 24.6 to 25.5" is fine to me. I've never had an issue with scale length. For while, I had a much lamented Japanese '66 Reissue Fender Jaguar (I had to sell it because I was broke - like most mid 60s reissue offsets, it had a thicker neck than your typical Jazzmaster or Jaguar), and I got along fine with its 24" scale length.

    Ellen

  46. #45

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    I can think of two instruments off the bat that meet your specifications, one vintage and one new.

    1. Vintage Hofner
    Hofner made an all-laminated, 17" archtop called the 4550 during the 1950s and 1960s. This came with various rim depths but was typically deep-bodied. It came with or without a cutaway and with or without one or two pickups. There is no shortage of these guitars of the cutaway, two-pickup variety. The 1960s versions have adjustable trussrods and nice big necks. See attached for one example of a 4550/S/E2 (S means cutaway and E2 means two pickups). The scale length is @25.25" These guitars can be found for $1,200 or less, and can easily be modified with different pickups/hardware. As well, there are a few other, very nice, vintage, Hofner 17" archtops, but they tend to cost more than $1,200.

    2. Modern Hofner
    Hofner introduced a lower-cost, all-laminated, 17", full-depth, cutaway, archtop guitar called the J5 during the 2000s. It was first made in Korea, then China. These were available either with one floating or one set-in pickup. This model evolved into the more recent Chinese-made "Bluetone" series, which included a an all-laminated, 17", full-depth, cutaway, archtop guitar with two pickups, available in blonde or sunburst. 25.5" scale. See attached pix. All of the ones I have tried have had big necks. They are quite inexpensive due to Hofner's inattention to marketing them properly. They sell new for well under $1,000 and can easily be modified with different pickups/hardware. I have been surprised by the quality of these guitars.
    Attached Images Attached Images Hollow Body and Semi-Hollowbody Guitars - Ugh!!! I'm Stuck!-hct-sl-e2-sb-jpg Hollow Body and Semi-Hollowbody Guitars - Ugh!!! I'm Stuck!-hct-sl-e2-n-jpg Hollow Body and Semi-Hollowbody Guitars - Ugh!!! I'm Stuck!-hof-4550-s-e2-jpg 
    Last edited by Hammertone; 11-27-2019 at 03:43 PM.
    "Somebody get me out of this chair." - BOB WILLS
    Hammertone is a registered Hofnerologist.

  47. #46

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hammertone View Post
    I can think of two instruments off the bat that meet your specifications, one vintage and one new.

    1. Vintage Hofner
    Hofner made an all-laminated, 17" archtop called the 4550 during the 1950s and 1960s. This came with various rim depths but was typically deep-bodied. It came with or without a cutaway and with or without one or two pickups. There is no shortage of these guitars of the cutaway, two-pickup variety. The 1960s versions have adjustable trussrods and nice big necks. See attached for one example of a 4550/S/E2 (S means cutaway and E2 means two pickups). The scale length is @25.25" These guitars can be found for $1,200 or less, and can easily be modified with different pickups/hardware. As well, there are a few other, very nice, vintage, Hofner 17" archtops, but they tend to cost more than $1,200.

    2. Modern Hofner
    Hofner introduced a lower-cost, all-laminated, 17", full-depth, cutaway, archtop guitar called the J5 during the 2000s. It was first made in Korea, then China. These were available either with one floating or one set-in pickup. This model evolved into the more recent Chinese-made "Bluetone" series, which included a an all-laminated, 17", full-depth, cutaway, archtop guitar with two pickups, available in blonde or sunburst. 25.5" scale. See attached pix. All of the ones I have tried have had big necks. They are quite inexpensive due to Hofner's inattention to marketing them properly. They sell new for well under $1,000 and can easily be modified with different pickups/hardware. I have been surprised by the quality of these guitars.

    Ooh! I never considered a Hoffner. I've liked the ones I've played (thought it has been a few years), and I do kind of regret blowing off the Hofner hollowbody (I think it was a Contemporary Series mdel) about 11 years ago (it was a nice guitar at a good price, but at the time, I didn't want a guitar with "only a neck position pickup"). I'll have to look into this. Thanks for the info.

  48. #47

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    I've been doing some additional thinking and online searching. I have a line on some promising prospects so far:

    1. Hofner HI-5JF on eBay selling cheeep! It's an MIK model, so the chances are, that it has a nice, and chunky neck. My only misgiving is, that I prefer 2-pickup guitars, but this issue is not a deal breaker.

    Hofner HI-J5F-CN HOLLOWBODY GUITAR Electric Guitar in Cherry Red NEW | eBay


    2. 1982 Ibanez FG-100. It has a price reduction due to a finish chipout down to the wood, next to the binding on the back. I like Ibanez hollow and semi-hollow guitars, but oftentimes have misgivings about their neck thickness (they're right at the lower limit of what I like, and occasionally, due to manufacturing variances [yes even with CNC machining, some variation occurs], can be thinner than I like). I messaged the seller, and he informed me that the neck thickness is .875" (22mm) at the first fret, which is comparable to my old fender 60s Baja Tele (which had a neck that I liked). It's little over my price range with shipping, but...... maybe I can talk it down???

    Ibanez FG-100 1982 Sunburst | My Last Guitar | Reverb


    3. DeArmond X-155. This just came up on my radar this morning. They're Korean made, and have 17" wide lower bouts. The prices sure look good. My question is: does anybody know what the necks are like on these guitars? Once again there is a lack of information online, about the neck dimensions.

    DeArmond "X-155 Hollow Body" in Electric Guitars | Reverb


    4. Carlo Robelli Manhattan. This is basically a re-branded Peerless Monarch, made for Sam Ash music stores. The price is right, and I will not lie, I am kind of drawn to Peerless Monarchs. But once again, there is that lack of neck dimension specifications (ugh!!). Does anybody know (or can measure) what the neck thickness is on a Peerless Monarch at the first fret?

    Carlo Robelli Manhattan 1960's Sunburst | Tonepros Music | Reverb


    5. Westerly (pre-Fender) Guild X-150D Savoy - just at the limit price-wise for me (but I wouldn't have to pay shipping - the seller lives close-by). Not sure about the neck, and due to my ignorance, I don't know if it's a 17" hollowbody. There's a lack of spec. information about these guitars online. But it sure looks good.

    Guild X-150 D Savoy 1997-1999 Blonde Pre Fender Built in | Reverb



    6. Ibanez AFJ-957 - I always end up getting another 7-string sooner or later, but I am beyond bored with the typical super-strat 7-string, and I'd really like to have a hollow or semi-hollow 7-string (I had a semi-hollow Danelectro MOD7 for several years, but I got sick of its bizarre pickup switching). Yes, I'd prefer a longer scale length, yes the body is 16", and yes the neck will not be chunky, but I doubt that Ibanez was foolish enough to use a Wizard profile neck (which feels like a 2x4 in my hands) like they use on their other 7-strings, and probably used a C-shape neck, so it's probably acceptable to me, considering the neck width. Yes, I'd prefer the Ibanez AF207, but those are pretty rare. Hollow and semi-hollow 7-strings are kind of thin on the ground. I don't know..............

    https://reverb.com/item/29647885-iba...wbody-sunburst


    Feel free to chime in at any time.

    Ellen

  49. #48

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  50. #49

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    dearmond x-155 is solid guitar..has usa made dearmond pickups...neck is substantial, but not huge...here's spec

    Hollow Body and Semi-Hollowbody Guitars - Ugh!!! I'm Stuck!-x155-jpg

    cheers

  51. #50

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    Thanks for the DeArmond specs neatomic. b

    P.S. - are you getting the snow today? We're just getting flurries every now and then. Green Bay, and farther north, they're getting hit. Even up in my hometown (Manitowoc), they might get 6 inches of the white stuff.