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  1. #1

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    I had a dream... i was playing an old Es 330 and it was so nice. So i tried one from 1967 2 weeks ago in a vintage shop and i really loved it... thé sound, thé weigth, thé design...everything ... unfortunately it was already booked and i cried. Thé price in paris for that guitar is 4200 euros ( my bank cries..)
    Now i am still hunting and i have a contact for a 1960 model for a lower price !
    Dot instead of inlays, shorter neck, maybe also a diffèrent neck design...
    Prices on reverb for a es 330TD SB 1960 are between 4000 and 10 000 euros so it is crazy !!! Thé one i am looking for is to sell for 3800 euros ( no mods). Is it a correct price for you or it is too low to be fair ?
    What are the main points to check on a vintage guitar ? For that model maybe ?
    Does someone Already compared a 1959-1961 model with on older one with longer neck ? Pro and cons ?
    Last question for es330 users, what is your favorite amp to play clean jazz or with a bit of OD ? I havé currently a vibroluxe Clone and a DV mark LJ.
    Thanks for your help
    Julien



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  3. #2

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    In general the short-neck (16th fret body joint) are much more sought after and usually command higher prices. Dot-necks command higher prices than block-necks. (That's why the VOS is a reissue of the '59 dot-neck.)

    So a 1960 for 'only' €3800 is either a great bargain or a dog :-D.

    The VOS and RI models command asking prices of €2700-2900 in the used market over here in the Netherlands, but I don see them go for those prices. New I see them advertised for around €3000-3200 but the supply and choice is very thin.
    Jazz, Funk, Soul & Boogaloo: My group | Listen to Hip Jazz a Go Go! | Jazz, Soul, Blues: Eva La Voix

  4. #3

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    Definitely the 16th fret joint, I agree. It’s a different guitar otherwise IMHO. Also the pickups not being new, high output, but I feel that’s with any guitar.

    I play with a Tweed Deluxe, big fan. Also big fan with a PRRI. I think it’s hard to go wrong

    If you want to be able to buy the guitar and pay the rent you can consider a more recent model (I’m happy with my 2018) or even a recent MIJ Casino Elitist, you may be positively surprised.

  5. #4

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    All of the 330 guitars are GREAT. However, the short-neck ones are the best! There is nothing wrong with the block-neck, metal covered P90 examples. They just don't look like Grant Green's guitar. The short-neck ones get THAT sound, however. And what a sound it is.

    The weight, feel, and total vibe of those instruments is just perfect.

    Good luck in your quest.

  6. #5

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    I have seen Epiphone Casinos, the '61 ReIssue model (just like a vintage ES330 w. 16th fret neck join and Gibson USA p90's and electronics for sale used, on Reverb. There were some from Germany, and elsewhere in Europe, north of France. Buy one! They are great re-issues with great tone woods and necks.

  7. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by Greentone View Post
    However, the short-neck ones are the best!
    That seems to be the consensus here, but why? Why not the longer neck?


    Gibson ES-330 Dream-es-330-jpg

  8. #7

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    I like the long-neck ES-330, too, but the "short-neck" variety places the frets exactly where they are when you play a Gibson archtop of, say, the ES-175 variety.

    As a long-time owner of an ES-335 I can attest to the minor irritation of having the neck displaced approximately 2-3 frets leftward in your playing field. The feeling is sort of like sitting at a piano too far to the right. You, then, have to consciously think about where the notes are. You get used to it, but the ES-172/125/150/330(short-neck), etc., just feel "right." Everything is balanced and the notes just fall under your fingers.

  9. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by Greentone View Post
    I like the long-neck ES-330, too, but the "short-neck" variety places the frets exactly where they are when you play a Gibson archtop of, say, the ES-175 variety.

    As a long-time owner of an ES-335 I can attest to the minor irritation of having the neck displaced approximately 2-3 frets leftward in your playing field. The feeling is sort of like sitting at a piano too far to the right. You, then, have to consciously think about where the notes are. You get used to it, but the ES-172/125/150/330(short-neck), etc., just feel "right." Everything is balanced and the notes just fall under your fingers.
    Don’t you think the tone is different as well?

  10. #9

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    The tone _should_ be different with the different neck joint. However, what I always noticed was the smoother playability of the short neck 330.

  11. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by Greentone View Post
    The tone _should_ be different with the different neck joint. However, what I always noticed was the smoother playability of the short neck 330.
    I don't know what you mean by smoother playability exactly, but in theory the long neck should have a smoother (looser?) feel because the bridge being shifted towards the shoulders allows for more 'afterlength' of the strings after the bridge. But there are other factors of course and it's just that: theory. I do think the shortnecks are a bit better balanced as in you don't have to reach so far for the lower notes.
    Jazz, Funk, Soul & Boogaloo: My group | Listen to Hip Jazz a Go Go! | Jazz, Soul, Blues: Eva La Voix

  12. #11

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    Little Jay, you just nailed it. You don't have to reach to grab the notes.

  13. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by Greentone View Post
    I like the long-neck ES-330, too, but the "short-neck" variety places the frets exactly where they are when you play a Gibson archtop of, say, the ES-175 variety.

    As a long-time owner of an ES-335 I can attest to the minor irritation of having the neck displaced approximately 2-3 frets leftward in your playing field. The feeling is sort of like sitting at a piano too far to the right. You, then, have to consciously think about where the notes are. You get used to it, but the ES-172/125/150/330(short-neck), etc., just feel "right." Everything is balanced and the notes just fall under your fingers.
    I see, I thought you meant it was all about the sound. I agree that the shorter neck feels better.

  14. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by Woody Sound View Post
    I see, I thought you meant it was all about the sound. I agree that the shorter neck feels better.
    The feel is different but my preference earlier came from tone as well. The problem with that is that I’ve never tested two identical guitars just with the joint difference.

  15. #14

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    I have an ES-390 which I guess has a long neck and a short body. I am good.

  16. #15

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    Thanks all, it is really existing to read you. I have sold my gb10 last Friday to get thé cash and buy that guitar ( should happen in the followings days) and i am wondering now which kind of string I will use. I don t know what was the grant green ‘s choice but I am thinking about thomastik 11-47 flat because I want to keep that mellow tone for traditional jazz.
    What are you recommandations ?
    As I want also use it with small overdrive for chorus is it the best choice ?

  17. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by Zheul View Post
    I had a dream... i was playing an old Es 330 and it was so nice. So i tried one from 1967 2 weeks ago in a vintage shop and i really loved it... thé sound, thé weigth, thé design...everything ... unfortunately it was already booked and i cried. Thé price in paris for that guitar is 4200 euros ( my bank cries..)
    Now i am still hunting and i have a contact for a 1960 model for a lower price !
    Dot instead of inlays, shorter neck, maybe also a diffèrent neck design...
    Prices on reverb for a es 330TD SB 1960 are between 4000 and 10 000 euros so it is crazy !!! Thé one i am looking for is to sell for 3800 euros ( no mods). Is it a correct price for you or it is too low to be fair ?
    What are the main points to check on a vintage guitar ? For that model maybe ?
    Does someone Already compared a 1959-1961 model with on older one with longer neck ? Pro and cons ?
    Last question for es330 users, what is your favorite amp to play clean jazz or with a bit of OD ? I havé currently a vibroluxe Clone and a DV mark LJ.
    Thanks for your help
    Julien



    Envoyé de mon iPhone en utilisant Tapatalk
    I love to play my friends es330, but 10k, now that is a lot of money
    Testing a Gibson ES335 vs Harley Benton HB 35 (very inexpensive semi hollow body guitar)

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8fGMIs1wNEA&t=185s

    Jamming the Jazz standard All the things you are
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jUzDEct613g&t=3s

    Playing a solo over my friends tune Cookies and Cream
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iJHqt_lpyKM

  18. #17

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    Here we are ! I have just get my 1960 Gibson es-330 and I am so in love!! Pictures and comments will follow !


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  19. #18

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    Congratulations on the purchase! But...... pics or it didn’t happen! ;-)
    Jazz, Funk, Soul & Boogaloo: My group | Listen to Hip Jazz a Go Go! | Jazz, Soul, Blues: Eva La Voix

  20. #19

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    I don't get the dislike of the 330L or preference for the shorter neck. It (the 330L) has the same neck join as a 335 and I have yet to read a complaint about "reach" on a 335. For that matter, the standard 330 has the same neck join as a Les Paul and I have read some players complain the LP feels cramped. Maybe it's the weight difference between the 335 and 330L that makes the 335 neck join less noticeable?
    Regards,

    Gary

  21. #20

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    Gibson ES-330 Dream-es-330-front-1-jpgGibson ES-330 Dream-es-330-frontjpg-jpg

  22. #21

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    Zheul, I am jealous!Congratulations! Beautiful guitar, Grant Green vibes! Enjoy it in good health!
    Jazz, Funk, Soul & Boogaloo: My group | Listen to Hip Jazz a Go Go! | Jazz, Soul, Blues: Eva La Voix

  23. #22

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    Thanks Little Jay,
    Thé guitar sounds so good. Especialy thé neck p90 which is really powerfull! I can play with thé tone to cover really différent kind of sounds from classic jazzy vibes or more percussive, roots / funky style.
    Thé bridge pick up has less « woaw effect » but I am at the beginning of the story and need more time for exploration...a bit of overdrive maybe...
    What is also funny is that I am so anthousiastic about the pure sound that I am thinking about selling most part of my pedals has they change the sound for something different from the perfection... Honey Moon !



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  24. #23

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    Gibson ES-330 Dream-2013-06-29-252-copia-jpg

  25. #24

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    This is a perfect match, Gibson 330TD and Fender pro reverb; drums too is some old goodies. they sound fantastic together and you don't need anything else thru the guitar and the amp; I bought in the '84 and the amp little bit late. If you find one try and buy it that's for the life. Good picking George

  26. #25

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    You guys got me more and more convinced I 'need' an ES-330.....

    (Although my '77 Framus Caravelle comes pretty close:



    ;-)


    Enjoy your 330s and let them inspire you!
    Jazz, Funk, Soul & Boogaloo: My group | Listen to Hip Jazz a Go Go! | Jazz, Soul, Blues: Eva La Voix

  27. #26

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    Thé Combination of Es330 with my vibrolux clone is so perfect .. but know I have to admit that I am a little bit disappointed with my dv mark LJ . I didn’t find the right setting.
    In the past , with my gb 10 both amp were easily compatible but now , with round string, feeling is very different from fender s one to dv mark.
    To much noisy trebles with LJ,
    I use the LT for repetition and fender for concert I can join by car ...
    I may go back to flat strings...


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  28. #27

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    For me it’s flatwound strings only....

    But don’t be afraid to turn trebles down on your DV LJ! I notice a lot of guitarists feel it’s ‘wrong’ to turn down the trebles all the way, because somehow it’s counterintuitive.... but if it sounds better, hey why not? And while you’re at it: try turning the mids up all the way and see how you like that!
    Jazz, Funk, Soul & Boogaloo: My group | Listen to Hip Jazz a Go Go! | Jazz, Soul, Blues: Eva La Voix

  29. #28

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    Thanks for the tip little Jay, it is much more better. I have also put the LJ on the ground with a small angle and it sounds great. I am now considering a real tool as the standback ampstand to also tilt my vibrolux and improve the sound.
    I will see as the last step a strings change with flat gauge.
    Thanks


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  30. #29

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    Beautiful guitars...you got me GASsing again...

    (Not that I need any help...I am naturally GASsy...)

    My BIL has a 1965 or so 335TD (with Bigsby) that he is selling on consignment--was at Willie's Guitars, now I think at Lavonne's in the Twin Cities area. He was asking ~$10,000 or so but it has been on sale for over a year. He is not in a hurry to sell. He bought the guitar when he was in high school and has kept it all these years in pristine condition. A real collector's guitar.

    As an aside I know not everyone wants a Grant Green tone, but I assume he was using high-gauge flatwounds? Anyone know?
    “Without music, life would be a mistake”--Friedrich Nietzsche

    Current lineup: Gibson ES-135 ('02), Peerless Sunset, Harmony Brilliant Cutaway ('64), Godin 5th Avenue, Alvarez AC60 A/E classical, Kay K37 ('56), Fender Squier VM Jazz bass, several ukes. Amps: Fishman Artist, Fender SCXD, Pignose 7-100.

  31. #30

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    Quote Originally Posted by Zheul View Post
    Thanks for the tip little Jay, it is much more better. I have also put the LJ on the ground with a small angle and it sounds great. I am now considering a real tool as the standback ampstand to also tilt my vibrolux and improve the sound.
    I will see as the last step a strings change with flat gauge.
    Thanks
    No amp stand needed, I make my own tilt back legs:

    Jazz, Funk, Soul & Boogaloo: My group | Listen to Hip Jazz a Go Go! | Jazz, Soul, Blues: Eva La Voix

  32. #31

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    Beautiful guitar! Congratulations, and play it in good health!
    Best regards, k

  33. #32

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    Quote Originally Posted by Little Jay View Post
    No amp stand needed, I make my own tilt back legs:

    Tilting is good but in my experience over 50% of the stages are built so that the amp on the floor makes the room hum excessively. At least here in Finland, small clubs, festivals etc, they are everywhere.

    With a cheap stand You get the tilt and enough rise that Your bassist, mixer and audience thank.

    330 looks good!

  34. #33

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    I have a Reissue '59 330 and I prefer the shorter neck just for comfort. On a 335 or similar the first frets are a bit far away. The downside is that playing above the 17th fret feels very uncomfortable. But honestly a guitar doesn't sound good up there anyway.
    I've been going back and forth between flatwounds and roundwounds for some time since I got the guitar this spring. Love the brightness of the roundwounds but also the punchier tones of the flats – so these stay for now. I'm in a funky organ trio so the more punch, the better IMHO. We play the vintage Grant Green stuff as well as the more modern songs from Soulive and the New Mastersounds et al.
    Funny enough I also have a GB10 which I also love (so I'm in hollowbody heaven). Made me a believer that body depth does indeed make a difference. How do you think the 330 and the GB compare? Decadent, luxurious questions ....

  35. #34

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    Quote Originally Posted by Zheul View Post
    I don t know what was the grant green ‘s choice but I am thinking about thomastik 11-47 flat because I want to keep that mellow tone for traditional jazz.
    What are you recommandations ?
    As I want also use it with small overdrive for chorus is it the best choice ?
    I read somewhere that Grant green used a flatwound .014 set. Just try google to find out more. My 330 has D'Addario Chromes .012 for now. Feels very comfortable at home, with the band I thought I could use even bigger strings – tone is perfect but I could use a little stiffer feel to dig in even more. I'll try it when changing strings in a year or so ....