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  1. #1

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    They just pulled all their YouTube Videos. Authentically strange.
    Redeemed, Husband, Father, Veteran. Thankful for all four!

    I play a customized Godin 5th Avenue, Córdoba GK Studio, and a Hamer Korina. I also play a Kala uBass on occasion

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    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #2

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    You haven't heard about the Eastman's take back ? All facilities are moving to Beijing.

  4. #3

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    What’s Going On Now at Gibson?-screen-shot-2019-09-29-3-34-10-pm-jpg
    The marketing department reduced decades of history and culture to six categories.

  5. #4

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    It is looking a lot like Levi-Strauss...Stick to your button-fly 501s.

    See, we're starting to miss Henry J. now, aren't we?

  6. #5
    It's so sad to go through the Gibson website and not see any ES guitars apart from the 335...

  7. #6

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    I'm hoping that the current rudimentary lineup is more to "safe" it while the turbulence from a change of leadership smooths out. I guess they're not prioritizing stuff that won't sell, such as the ES-175. In the years I've worked at the guitar store and the years before when I was a "hangout" customer who'd be there a lot every week, I have never seen an ES-175 sell - my store has stocked one which another employee bought, and the sister store stocks still a 2016 model that's been marked down many times.

    I don't think that we "owe" Gibson anything, and brand loyalty is a dangerous path, but I -have- two Gibson guitars which I adore. It's completely unscientific to say so, but only a Gibson is a Gibson, and I for one, appreciate the "mojo" for what it is. Hope it turns out well in the end.

  8. #7

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    Getting back to "core" collections... in other words their money maker lines is sound management for a company in recovery mode.

    Didn't GM 86 Pontiac and Saturn? Ford too... "Ford dropping all but 2 cars from its North American dealerships" (The mustang is a keeper) to focus on SUV's and trucks. Companies do it all the time.

    Will we see archtops and other semi hollow models back? Sure if they can make a business case that brings in money, but they may not be cheap.

    This is (IMO) good news for current owners who may finally see some value added to what they have. Prospective owners can either pony up or go to Asian brands. Good news for Ibanez, Eastman and others.

    Do I miss previous management? nope never will.
    Regards,

    Gary

  9. #8

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    My understanding is that the Gibson guitar business remained profitable. It was the acquisitions what done Gibson in. Buying the the audio, video, multimedia and accessories business of Royal Philips was a very peculiar decision.

  10. #9

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    The Second Golden Age of Gibson Custom Shop guitars arguably came under the stewardship of Henry J.. Henry J may have his moments of barmy designs like the Firebird X in the later years and the Tronical debâcle but he kept the Custom Shop archtops in production when the death knell for them was sounded as early as 1989 under Norlin. Till Gibson went into receivership he kept archtops in production all the way to the very end. That is respecting tradition and the history of the Gibson Guitar Company.

    And let us not forget Gibson Bozeman, Montana.

    Do I miss Henry J? In truth, I do. The Gibson Custom Shop produced more interesting guitars then. Look at their Instagram and Facebook postings.

  11. #10

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    Just a beginning to an eventual slow, sad end.

    The archtops aren't coming back guys. Ain't a single young gun in jazz playing a new Gibson. Not one.
    Jeff Matz, Jazz Guitar:
    http://www.youtube.com/user/jeffreymatz

    "Jazz is like life...it goes on longer than you think, and as soon as you're like 'oh, I get it,' it ends."

    --The Ghost of Duke Ellington

  12. #11

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    At the Rocky Mountain Archtop Festival last week, I listened in on a number of conversations relating to archtops (not just Gibson) and their use in music among some performers. One performer put it this way:

    - Jazz as a musical genre represents about 1-2% of musical listening.
    - Within jazz, only about 10% of music is guitar led artists (most are horn players of keyboards)
    - So only 0.1-0.2% of listeners represents the jazz guitar market today
    - As a result, performers have a difficult time making a living on pure jazz gigs, instruction, recording.
    - Therefore, a more versatile guitar like a Tele or semi hollowbody covers more musical ground

    I think this, plus the inherently higher cost of quality archtops pretty much explains their decline in the musical scene. Gibson who is in financial distress is simply recognizing the realities of the day (plus there are many of their past guitars competing with them on the used market).
    __________________________________________________ ____________________________________
    Bob


  13. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by iim7V7IM7 View Post
    At the Rocky Mountain Archtop Festival last week, I listened in on a number of conversations relating to archtops (not just Gibson) and their use in music among some performers. One performer put it this way:

    - Jazz as a musical genre represents about 1-2% of musical listening.
    - Within jazz, only about 10% of music is guitar led artists (most are horn players of keyboards)
    - So only 0.1-0.2% of listeners represents the jazz guitar market today
    - As a result, performers have a difficult time making a living on pure jazz gigs, instruction, recording.
    - Therefore, a more versatile guitar like a Tele or semi hollowbody covers more musical ground

    I think this, plus the inherently higher cost of quality archtops pretty much explains their decline in the musical scene. Gibson who is in financial distress is simply recognizing the realities of the day (plus there are many of their past guitars competing with them on the used market).
    Maybe so, but Gibson is a company that was founded upon, and made a success by archtop guitars. Those who do not honor and build on their past may not have a rewarding future.
    _____________________________________________
    "When the chord changes, you should change" Joe Pass

  14. #13

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    In addition to the above analysis- the market is saturated with Archtop offerings at various price points. This serves the beginner, seasoned professional and collector. We never had this availability back in the 90’s Archtop Renaissance period, nor was the internet the main shopping platform.

    Between You -Tube , the internet , and guitar forums , a buyer has more information available to make choices without leaving the couch. I believe this has had an adverse affect on guitar shows in general.

    On the bright side I believe there are still many seasoned Archtop enthusiasts searching for the elusive sound - and will continue to spend ( significant $$’s) and explore all available market offerings.

    The Archtop is a thing of beauty - and is an art form unlike a static painting -it can satisfy ones visual/ emotional senses along with making music. The well established high end builders I know have healthy backlogs and are producing some of the best Archtops ever made. Bill Comins recently brought 2 new guitars to the Harrisburg show - both were sold immediately. These instruments are not factory guitars and they serve a different clientele.

    However - from a Gibson build prospective it may not be such an attractive prospect. With the cost of labor and materials increasing - and dealer risk sharing becoming problematic- it has changed the way money is being invested.

    Additionally, Gibson has a perception issue of late and their retail pricing has had a negative affect on “life time Gibson” Archtop enthusiasts.

    Despite the popular consensus - I don’t see the desire or interest for high quality Arch-tops changing anytime soon.

  15. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by Stringswinger View Post
    Maybe so, but Gibson is a company that was founded upon, and made a success by archtop guitars. Those who do not honor and build on their past may not have a rewarding future.
    I think I would take the exact opposite position: a company that focuses on their past without acceptance of the current reality is likely to fail. Changing economic, cultural, financial, and corporate conditions inevitably require that businesses either adapt or die.
    My CD "Bare Handed" is available as a download at Bandcamp.com
    http://jimsoloway.bandcamp.com/album/bare-handed

  16. #15

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    I visited the Mannheim Guitar Summit this weekend. Only a handful of archtops among the hundreds - maybe over a thousand - guitars on display. Even the brands with archtops in their portfolio, such as Ibanez or Collings, didn't show them. Eastman was archtop-shy, too, stressing their steel-string acoustics. A Hutchins-era L5 on the Saturday morning outdoor flea market could be had for a cool € 6,000.

  17. #16

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    Gibson's line-up is very limited. The new hipster management will most likely morph the new products into an "industrial" look.; flat metallic finishes, stain finish with scarring (fake vintage look), and blue tooth electronic gizmos. The archtops will probably never come back.....there is a reason they quit making them. If you are over 40 years old, you should be grateful to have been around as that was when Gibson made some of their best guitars. At least they did that, and we have the memories. For those of you who have the older Gibsons....hang onto them as now they will all go up in value.

  18. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Soloway View Post
    I think I would take the exact opposite position: a company that focuses on their past without acceptance of the current reality is likely to fail. Changing economic, cultural, financial, and corporate conditions inevitably require that businesses either adapt or die.
    There is no reason that Gibson cannot do both, honoring their past while at the same time adapting to the needs of the future.
    _____________________________________________
    "When the chord changes, you should change" Joe Pass

  19. #18

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    I should be thrilled by the anticipated run-up in values of my small collection but I am not. I would like see the tradition continue. It would be a sad day when nobody knows how to make them. With photographic and cinematic film, Polaroid media, when they went away photo artists lost a medium of expression.

    Skills when not passed down are soon forgotten and lost. Taste is often acquired and then passed down. If you do not supply them, the taste for them does not even get started.

    I was pootling around town checking out the many Rolex dealers in my small place. All the Yachtmasters, GMTs, Daytonas, Submariners, Sea Dwellers were sold out. I put myself on the waiting list and the dealer laughed. I must be the 100th person in line for a Yachtmaster 42 Platinum. He humoured me by saying that sometimes people do drop out. He would like to get more but Rolex could not supply them fast enough. Tudors and Omegas are aplenty. As are the other high-faluting Swiss marques with the unpronounceable names that show up a rube. Blancpain is painful when mispronounced.

    The proper marketing model is not Levi-Strauss; it is Rolex. There are guys who buy $10 000 to $20 000 guitars to play cowboy chords. You got to create that desire. They just want to be seen with "the best".

    It is starting to look like the Second Coming of Norlin. You are all going to miss Henry J..

  20. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by Stringswinger View Post
    There is no reason that Gibson cannot do both, honoring their past while at the same time adapting to the needs of the future.

    A Byrdland with G Force tuning system ? The best of both worlds...

  21. #20

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    I'll echo what's been already said. I do think it's important to honor the past,less we have shallower results. Just as in the current music is a great example of this.
    Unfortunately Bean counters are in control of this company.
    They have no vision sans profit,and along with current trends,what they are guitar is merely a prop for the current videos.

    I really think under Henry J there was the Golden Era. Unfortunately there was a lot of problems with Henry J ego as well.And we saw how,it was not only his but the companies downfall.

    Not sure how much Gibson Archtops will appreciate,since there isn't a huge market for them. Newer Jazz afecianados tend to be going with smaller luthier built Archtops like Victor Baker, Moffa, Japanese builds.
    I don't see many of today's players playing L-5 CES nor Tal Farlows. Benedetto might be the last company doing these instruments.

  22. #21

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    Quote Originally Posted by Stringswinger View Post
    There is no reason that Gibson cannot do both, honoring their past while at the same time adapting to the needs of the future.
    I think there probably is a good reason. Gibson as it is now constituted is a direct by product of their recent corporate failures. For all practical purposes they are now owned by their previous debt holders. These were not really willing buyers but rather creditors who were at risk of losing large amounts of money as a result of the company's possible failure. So yes, the bankruptcy eliminated their debt but the new owners primary motivator is almost certainly to recover their loses without having to make large additional investments or take a lot of new economic risk. That means maximizing efficiency and getting the best return from their resources that they possibly can. Building archtops is a time consuming exercise that requires highly skilled employees and expensive materials and takes a long time to produce an income. I can understand why the new owners, given their unfortunate situation would want to put all of their energy and resources into more economically productive production. I also suspect that the current owners will ultimately turn out to be short term caretakers of the company who see their ultimately opportunity to recoup their loses coming from eventually selling to a more willing buyer. As a result there is a lot more incentive for them to focus on the short term and leave the long term for those who will be there to experience it.
    My CD "Bare Handed" is available as a download at Bandcamp.com
    http://jimsoloway.bandcamp.com/album/bare-handed

  23. #22

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    You are describing marketing of Veblen goods which is successfully done with Luxury goods.

    Quote Originally Posted by Jabberwocky View Post
    I should be thrilled by the anticipated run-up in values of my small collection but I am not. I would like see the tradition continue. It would be a sad day when nobody knows how to make them. With photographic and cinematic film, Polaroid media, when they went away photo artists lost a medium of expression.

    Skills when not passed down are soon forgotten and lost. Taste is often acquired and then passed down. If you do not supply them, the taste for them does not even get started.

    I was pootling around town checking out the many Rolex dealers in my small place. All the Yachtmasters, GMTs, Daytonas, Submariners, Sea Dwellers were sold out. I put myself on the waiting list and the dealer laughed. I must be the 100th person in line for a Yachtmaster 42 Platinum. He humoured me by saying that sometimes people do drop out. He would like to get more but Rolex could not supply them fast enough. Tudors and Omegas are aplenty. As are the other high-faluting Swiss marques with the unpronounceable names that show up a rube. Blancpain is painful when mispronounced.

    The proper marketing model is not Levi-Strauss; it is Rolex. There are guys who buy $10 000 to $20 000 guitars to play cowboy chords. You got to create that desire. They just want to be seen with "the best".

    It is starting to look like the Second Coming of Norlin. You are all going to miss Henry J..
    __________________________________________________ ____________________________________
    Bob


  24. #23

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    People can't afford them, don't make them.

    People can afford them, go find them.

    Choose one.

    I was just joking to my friend - I wonder how many people who own a Yachtmaster own a yacht or even get their feet wet in a dinghy? There was Gordon Ramsay glaring back at me from a poster in his restaurant and Gordon was sporting a Yachtmaster 42 Platinum or White Gold as it is known in these parts. I am sure Gordon doesn't sail.

  25. #24

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    Quote Originally Posted by Stringswinger View Post
    Maybe so, but Gibson is a company that was founded upon, and made a success by archtop guitars. Those who do not honor and build on their past may not have a rewarding future.

    ......Sorry, but Gibson was founded on mandolins and banjos, and to their credit, they did change production focus once the market dictated it.

  26. #25

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    Sat through this lecture a week ago...

    __________________________________________________ ____________________________________
    Bob


  27. #26

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dennis D View Post
    ......Sorry, but Gibson was founded on mandolins and banjos, and to their credit, they did change production focus once the market dictated it.
    Gibson kept making both after guitars became the focus....
    _____________________________________________
    "When the chord changes, you should change" Joe Pass

  28. #27

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    Julian Lage, Gilad Hekselman, etc., converting to Teles isn't going to help the case for Gibson investing in equipment and specialized personnel to make archtops, either. The Les Paul has long been the brand's bread and butter- Jimmy Page and Slash are more influential in today's buying market than Johnny Smith or Wes Montgomery. But who knows, jazz may yet stage a resurgence among younger musicians and audiences and archtops may come back into demand; weirder things have happened.
    Beauty is as close to terror as we can well endure. -Rainer Maria Rilke

  29. #28

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jabberwocky View Post
    Blancpain is painful when mispronounced.
    "blanc" + "pain" = "white bread." Is that the intention of the branding?

    Thanks heavens I am perfectly happy with my watch that cost under $100 on sale 25 years ago. To paraphrase the old proverb, a man with a watch knows what time it is- a man with two is never sure.
    Beauty is as close to terror as we can well endure. -Rainer Maria Rilke

  30. #29

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    So will Gibson start making computers and video games? Maybe Henry J wasn't so crazy with his Firebird X,LOL!

  31. #30

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    Jeez! Jabs! Come to Maui and you’ll save money! Wear a sundial with a wrist strap!

    Quote Originally Posted by Jabberwocky View Post
    I should be thrilled by the anticipated run-up in values of my small collection but I am not. I would like see the tradition continue. It would be a sad day when nobody knows how to make them. With photographic and cinematic film, Polaroid media, when they went away photo artists lost a medium of expression.

    Skills when not passed down are soon forgotten and lost. Taste is often acquired and then passed down. If you do not supply them, the taste for them does not even get started.

    I was pootling around town checking out the many Rolex dealers in my small place. All the Yachtmasters, GMTs, Daytonas, Submariners, Sea Dwellers were sold out. I put myself on the waiting list and the dealer laughed. I must be the 100th person in line for a Yachtmaster 42 Platinum. He humoured me by saying that sometimes people do drop out. He would like to get more but Rolex could not supply them fast enough. Tudors and Omegas are aplenty. As are the other high-faluting Swiss marques with the unpronounceable names that show up a rube. Blancpain is painful when mispronounced.

    The proper marketing model is not Levi-Strauss; it is Rolex. There are guys who buy $10 000 to $20 000 guitars to play cowboy chords. You got to create that desire. They just want to be seen with "the best".

    It is starting to look like the Second Coming of Norlin. You are all going to miss Henry J..

  32. #31

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    Quote Originally Posted by Stringswinger View Post
    Gibson kept making both after guitars became the focus....
    technically yes, but mandolin and banjo sales suffered a steep drop in production once the L-5 took hold and especially once the lower line models were introduced as many couldn't afford the $275 for an L-5.
    the introduction of the F-5 mandolin was very late as mandolin sales had already started to decline, there's not a lot of post 20's mandolins and banjos.

  33. #32

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    Wildwood Guitars sold a lot of Gibson Archtops, darned nice ones too, in the run up to Gibson's chapter 11. They were never the "fly off the shelves" models anyway. They can sell again.

    Eric Clapton was right, we need new guitar heroes for the kids to get excited about.

    And we need (or Gibson needs) some young stars to appear on stage with fancy bright colored L5s. Taylor Swift and Justin Bieber are probably too far over the hill now, so somebody else. And don't forget the country fan base.

    The music is critical, as Clapton said, but imagery drives purchasing decisions too.

  34. #33

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    Quote Originally Posted by iim7V7IM7 View Post
    You are describing marketing of Veblen goods which is successfully done with Luxury goods.
    Veblen?

  35. #34

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    Some of Gibson choices are questionables, an example, Why launching an almost perfect Natural Limited Sg 2016, with 2 p90's, a classical C rounded neck, an affordable $1000 price, with an almost unplayable 39mm nut width (1.55 I think) ?? Why ? To preserve standard SG sellings ? So do nothing rather than disappoint your customers.
    If tomorrow you release a VOS L5, do you think making pink the only available color would be a good choice ? Perhaps a Floyd rose too ?

  36. #35

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    Quote Originally Posted by TedBPhx View Post
    Veblen?
    This may help...

    Veblen Good Definition
    __________________________________________________ ____________________________________
    Bob


  37. #36

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    Sometimes a company will have halo products that are not profitable but increase the brand's standing. Since we're not seeing much interest in archtops, Gibson is more likely to have overpriced Les Paul's than an archtop. Things change and music has changed a lot.
    Hell is full of musical amateurs - George Bernard Shaw

  38. #37
    Quote Originally Posted by mr. beaumont View Post
    Just a beginning to an eventual slow, sad end.

    The archtops aren't coming back guys. Ain't a single young gun in jazz playing a new Gibson. Not one.
    That's not unexpected with the asking prices. 10k for a gigging guitar..? Gibson itself put themselves outside a musicians perspective. Hope they enjoy their lifestyle guitars!

  39. #38

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    Guitar is not very important in the 21st century, it's glory days are over.

  40. #39

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    Quote Originally Posted by Stringswinger View Post
    There is no reason that Gibson cannot do both, honoring their past while at the same time adapting to the needs of the future.
    I totally agree. As far as Gibson marketing niche (Veblen--I learned a new word today) products, the demands of high-end buyers and collectors is highly fickle. Rolex today, Omega or Tissot tomorrow.

    OTOH, I don't think the archtop is dead. There are tons of younger artists playing archies all the time...just recently I have seen Guy Clarke Jr, Sturgill Simpson, Jeff Tweedy, and many others playing various archtops. Bob Weir plays an archtop for gosh sake.

    What's needed is focusing the marketing on such artists and making models that the average player can actually afford. There hasn't been a full-bodied Gibson archtop at a player's price for many years (Epiphone excluded). The 175 started out as a midlevel alternative that cost, yes, $175, which should cost about 10X that amount adjusted for inflation alone.

    The 135--my favorite model--is a great guitar that was always affordable and could be played in any genre of music, also played by some well-known artists. However, it's been out of production for almost 2 decades.

    I think that focusing on collectors and rich people is not a recipe for success in the mass-market guitar business though.
    “Without music, life would be a mistake”--Friedrich Nietzsche

    Current lineup: Gibson ES-135 ('02), Peerless Sunset, Harmony Brilliant Cutaway ('64), Godin 5th Avenue, Alvarez AC60 A/E classical, Kay K37 ('56), Fender Squier VM Jazz bass, several ukes. Amps: Fishman Artist, Fender SCXD, Pignose 7-100.

  41. #40

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    i'm interested in how this will affect gibson owned- epiphone...asian made archtops..the elitist, inspired by and premium archtops do pretty well...

    i still think asian made gibson branded archtops would work...maybe not for die hards around here, but for many younger or less historically motivated folk out there

    gretsch and guild did it with good results..some players even prefer modern gretsches to the brooklyn mades

    cheers

    ps- if the present owners don't consider it, someone else will down the line

  42. #41

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    So.. the local version of Gibson 'honoring their past' is making unprofitable products old jazz guys want them to make? Nope. I think they should make tenor guitars. And banjos. And mando-this and thats. Yes. Those.
    Hell is full of musical amateurs - George Bernard Shaw

  43. #42

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    I don't think they're unprofitable, especially now. Available on order only, price firm.

  44. #43

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tatayoyo View Post
    A Byrdland with G Force tuning system ? The best of both worlds...
    I just threw up in my mouth a little bit...

  45. #44

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    It used to be one was expected to know how to properly tune a guitar.
    Especially by the time you were good enough to play and own a Byrdland.

    But with all of immediate gratification needs required for the average consumers I can understand how self tuning guitars came into .being

  46. #45

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    Quote Originally Posted by TedBPhx View Post
    Veblen?
    I read this as vegan in my mind, the first time around. Had to do a double take.
    Redeemed, Husband, Father, Veteran. Thankful for all four!

    I play a customized Godin 5th Avenue, Córdoba GK Studio, and a Hamer Korina. I also play a Kala uBass on occasion

  47. #46

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jabberwocky View Post
    It is looking a lot like Levi-Strauss...Stick to your button-fly 501s.
    Unless your taking in lots of fluids...

  48. #47

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    Quote Originally Posted by starjasmine View Post
    I just threw up in my mouth a little bit...
    OMG, back when I was a professional mariner one dark and stormy night, I was up on the bridge of a heaving cargo ship in heavy seas and the Wheelman threw up in his mouth and swallowed it... which immediatley cleared the bridge as everyone hit the rails and started hurling because of what they had just witnessed...

    Thanks for the memories, it is humorous now when thinking back on that night of our misery.

  49. #48

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jabberwocky View Post
    I should be thrilled by the anticipated run-up in values of my small collection but I am not. I would like see the tradition continue. It would be a sad day when nobody knows how to make them. With photographic and cinematic film, Polaroid media, when they went away photo artists lost a medium of expression.

    Skills when not passed down are soon forgotten and lost. Taste is often acquired and then passed down. If you do not supply them, the taste for them does not even get started.

    I was pootling around town checking out the many Rolex dealers in my small place. All the Yachtmasters, GMTs, Daytonas, Submariners, Sea Dwellers were sold out. I put myself on the waiting list and the dealer laughed. I must be the 100th person in line for a Yachtmaster 42 Platinum. He humoured me by saying that sometimes people do drop out. He would like to get more but Rolex could not supply them fast enough. Tudors and Omegas are aplenty. As are the other high-faluting Swiss marques with the unpronounceable names that show up a rube. Blancpain is painful when mispronounced.
    This went for MUCH less than a Rolex and is MUCH better...I wish I'd seen it ahead of time instead of 10 years too late.

    Bonhams : A rare 16th century gold sundial and compass ring, possibly German,

  50. #49

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    Quote Originally Posted by mr. beaumont View Post
    Just a beginning to an eventual slow, sad end.

    The archtops aren't coming back guys. Ain't a single young gun in jazz playing a new Gibson. Not one.
    This is actually a very interesting point! I've only seen a handful of "new" Gibsons on young players, but it's never the big boxes. I guess my ES-139 isn't "new" anymore at 6 years old. I see some young players at the Academy, but if they're playing Gibsons, it's either something like a 339 or even a couple of SG's.

    I am tempted to suggest that the big jazz box is irrelevant in 2019, but then again, a lot of young players opt for instruments from smaller builders like Baker;


    ^This Vic Baker 15 inch model was $5500 in 2017. The only "new" ES-175 for sale where I'm from is $5200. I've tried one of these Bakers, and it's something else entirely.


    ^When you can get an all-carved archtop with a Lollar Imperial humbucker for $5200, the exact same price as an all-laminate ES with 57's, I can understand why a young player might opt for the former.
    (Just using Baker as an example, I know there's a ton of others)

    I don't know that there's any legitimacy to this supposition, but I wonder if Gibson painted themselves into a corner by banking on tradition and history before anything else? A lot of people I know see them as "dad" instruments, if that makes any sense. Then again, most young players are playing Fenders & superstrats, or Boutique strats and teles - I play a Tyler for gigs where I can't use an ES, such as an alternative rock gig yesterday. The other el.guitarist used a Suhr.

    Ibanez have made a great series with the AZ guitars, which have supposedly been made up using the input of very popular progressive & fusion players of the now. I can't speak for the validity for that particular claim, but I know a few people who have these guitars and they play like butter. None of the -serious- session players I know give a rat's ass about historical authenticity and all that... Henry J nearly hit the mark with innovation but seems like he didn't ask a single gigging musician... those robo tuners and all that, yuck!

  51. #50

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    Quote Originally Posted by GNAPPI View Post
    Getting back to "core" collections... in other words their money maker lines is sound management for a company in recovery mode.

    Didn't GM 86 Pontiac and Saturn? Ford too... "Ford dropping all but 2 cars from its North American dealerships" (The mustang is a keeper) to focus on SUV's and trucks. Companies do it all the time.
    Getting OT, but I always wondered why they didn't kill Olds or Buick instead of Pontiac. They could have incorporated aspects of Olds and Buick into one. One nice upscale lineup above Chev/Pontiac, and below Caddys. Oh well.