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  1. #1

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    A little OT here, but for a guitar customization task I need a bit that is a tad larger than 15/64, but smaller than 1/4. Is there such a thing as a 31/128 bit? Possibly even in a forstner? Looked around but can't seem to find one.
    Last edited by Woody Sound; 09-13-2019 at 09:01 AM.

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  3. #2
    Quote Originally Posted by Woody Sound View Post
    A little OT here, but for a guitar customization task I need a bit that is a tad larger than 15/64, but smaller than 1/4. Is there such a thing as a 31/128 bit? Possibly even in a forstner? Looked around but can't seem to find one.
    Sorry, I missed typed "15/64." Just corrected it.

  4. #3

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    Regards,

    Gary

  5. #4

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    Get a set of number and letter drills. I would not be without mine.

    I have a large drill chart that includes tap drill sizes on the wall in my shop.
    I refer to it all the time.

    Also get a micrometer. To double check the drill size.

  6. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by Woody Sound View Post
    Is there such a thing as a 31/128 bit? Possibly even in a forstner? Looked around but can't seem to find one.
    Got yer back right here
    "Don't worry about that. Everybody talks about finding your voice. Do your homework and your voice will find you." - Branford Marsalis

  7. #6
    Thanks to everyone.

  8. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by Woody Sound View Post
    Thanks to everyone.
    I suggest you pony up and get a decent set from a company like Irwin or Norseman, not something made of recycled steel that will smoke and heat up!

  9. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by GNAPPI View Post
    According to that a # 73 is the ticket. However, finding such an animal easily is another story...

    Two old woodworker's tricks are the following: take a slightly smaller bit and wiggle it around as you move it in and out. (Yeah, I know, that's what she said...)

    Or drill a smaller hole and use a round file to enlarge it. This is a bit more precise than the wiggle method.

    I have a set of titanium bits in 64ths. I have never found a project with guitars or any type of woodworking that that wouldn't work for.

    Edit: I did a little search and found quite a few, including at Home Depot: Access Denied

    However, whether you can get it at your local BORG in a timely fashion and for a reasonable price is still a question.
    “Without music, life would be a mistake”--Friedrich Nietzsche

    Current lineup: Gibson ES-135 ('02), Peerless Sunset, Harmony Brilliant Cutaway ('64), Godin 5th Avenue, Alvarez AC60 A/E classical, Kay K37 ('56), Fender Squier VM Jazz bass, several ukes. Amps: Fishman Artist, Fender SCXD, Pignose 7-100.

  10. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by Doctor Jeff View Post
    According to that a # 73 is the ticket. However, finding such an animal easily is another story...

    Two old woodworker's tricks are the following: take a slightly smaller bit and wiggle it around as you move it in and out. (Yeah, I know, that's what she said...)

    Or drill a smaller hole and use a round file to enlarge it. This is a bit more precise than the wiggle method.

    I have a set of titanium bits in 64ths. I have never found a project with guitars or any type of woodworking that that wouldn't work for.

    Edit: I did a little search and found quite a few, including at Home Depot: Access Denied

    However, whether you can get it at your local BORG in a timely fashion and for a reasonable price is still a question.
    I think you missed a decimal point it would be a B C or D.

  11. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by helios View Post
    I suggest you pony up and get a decent set from a company like Irwin or Norseman, not something made of recycled steel that will smoke and heat up!
    My dad and I butted heads a lot over that... "Sharpen that drill... get the oil on it... slow down...let the drill do the work don't press so hard!

    Literally growing up in a machine shop gave me too little discipline for dad. He memorized the damn Machinery Handbook :-)
    Regards,

    Gary

  12. #11

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    Reaming the hole very slightly with the bit usually works, but it does depend on the material and the thickness. It doesn't work well in very hard wood that is as thick as the bit is long. I hesitated to suggest that because I don't know enough about the project. But for thinner pieces, using a smaller bit and reaming slightly usually works for me. Or else using the larger bit and having a slightly larger hole, depending on what is going on in the hole. Some things require tighter tolerances than others.