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  1. #1

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    The fine archtop maker and friend of JGF turned 65 today ! Happy Birthday Mark ! May we all be blessed with many more years of your great archtop guitar building.

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    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #2

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    Happy Birthday Mark - and thanks for providing us with your beautiful instruments !

  4. #3

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    Happy birthday Mark.
    Keith Murch

  5. #4

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    Happy birthday Mark sign up for Medicare hopefully it will improve your situation.
    specializing in repair and setup, does your guitar play like it should?

  6. #5

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    Happy Birthday, Mark, and thanks for brightening up our world with your elegant guitars!
    Best regards, k

  7. #6

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    Sincere thanks to all you guys who sent birthday wishes!.....and to deacon Mark, I got my Medicare card on August 1st, so I'm all set (lol).

  8. #7
    Medicare card and a bottle of Geritol. We are good to go.

  9. #8

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    Happy Birthday Mark! I'm glad that you were born! I'm one of the fortunate owners of your guitars. Thanks, and many good wishes. Steve

  10. #9

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    Happy Birthday Mark, you're a great guy and now you're in The Club (65 and over).

    Big

  11. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by vinnyv1k View Post
    Medicare card and a bottle of Geritol. We are good to go.
    Why it might be better to take Social Security at age 66 instead of 70 - MarketWatch

    -- Isn't it crazy that "archtop" and "luthier" are spelling errors on this forum?

  12. #11

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    Social Security and Medicare are not the same things. If you don't enroll in Medicare at the first opportunity, you pay a penalty for the rest of your life. That's not the case for receiving Social Security payments. I decided to start taking that at my full retirement age, even though I was still working, because the increase by waiting didn't exceed the amount I received, and saved & invested, earlier on. And I had no guarantee that I would live to 70. I did, but it wasn't guaranteed. This is a much harder decision than enrolling in Medicare, which is a no-brainer regardless of circumstances. I did delay enrolling in Part B, because I was covered by employment, but that's a different thing. Part A (hospitalization) is mandatory, and if you're paying for your own coverage, Part B is close to it.

  13. #12
    Yes you must enroll with Medicare at 65. At least part A which is free. Next June I will be 66 and will start drawing my SS and hop onto part B also. 1954 is the cut off year for age 66. 1955 is 67. Age 62 carries a 32% penalty plus you cannot make too much money or they take it back. At 66 born 1954 or earlier there are no penalties.

  14. #13
    My wife started drawing SS at 62 but she retired at 48. She pays $134 a month for part B which is automatically taken out of her SS check every month. She actually doesn’t need part B until I retire. Then we will both need A&B plus a supplemental insurance. A&B only covers 80% of your medical costs.

  15. #14

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    Since in my real profession I was a medicaid supervisor and directly worked with Medicaid and Medicare for 34 years.....

    Do not rely on anything said here. It is not that it is wrong but these decisions and research make guitar discussion nothing.

    Serious business to get the facts and plan. Much more involved than headstock cracks, finish checking, refretting, or what kind of strings I need.
    specializing in repair and setup, does your guitar play like it should?

  16. #15

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    You can begin drawing Social Security at any time after age 62, whether working or not. It's not necessarily a good idea, but it's possible and legal. I started at 66, my full retirement age, because I thought it was better for me. Everyone's situation is different, so don't make any decisions based on what I or anyone else did.

    Medicare Part (hospitalization) A is free, starting at age 65. Part B (doctors and other medical expenses) has to be paid, and that normally is deducted from one's social security check, but can be paid separately if not receiving social security checks. It costs ~135/month. That's usually less than one would pay a private insurance company, and with better coverage. However, if you're getting free health insurance from your employer, it is usually better to continue with that and delay Part B coverage until no longer employed, or covered by that insurance. There is a penalty for not getting Part B at age 65 unless you're covered by other insurance, and you have to present evidence of credible coverage from age 65 until enrolling in Part B. I had decent insurance from my employer, for both my wife and me, and the coverage for her was less than the Part B premiums. Not everyone gets that sort of coverage, though. If you're paying out of pocket, and it's more than ~$120/month for full coverage, then Medicare Part B is probably a better choice. You can also enroll in a Medicare Advantage plan which may cover Part D prescription drugs, for no additional premium, in exchange for being locked in to their HMO. We did that and are happy with it, but it's not the best for everyone.

    This is a serious decision with long-term implications, some of them lifetime, and I would certainly encourage anyone approaching age 65 to do a careful study and get all the information possible. The Medicare website, Medicare.gov: the official U.S. government site for Medicare | Medicare has the reliable information, but like most government info, can be hard to understand. You don't have to be eligible for medicare in order to sign up for an account, and to access the information. Start early and learn all you can before you turn 65, because it will affect your life for as long as you live. Again, social security and medicare are not the same things, although they do have some influences on each other.

    Excuse me, but I'm flying blind here. I'm asking this question to perhaps benefit many here who are over age 62. One is able to begin drawing Social Security even though they're still working?
    Yes, you can draw Social Security even though you're still working. At least for people my age, you can make all you want, but have to pay tax on a portion of your Social Security income, depending on the amount you earn. Whether it's a good idea to start drawing Social Security while still working is something you need to investigate, because it's not ideal for everyone. It is possible, though.

    Apologies for turning a Happy Birthday thread for Mark into a sermon.

  17. #16
    Agreed Deacon Mark. I am not looking forward to the medical logistics I need to take care of when I retire. Lots of decisions and plans. Retirement.....one size does not fit all.

    Back to guitars....did you ever notice the best archtops are made by Italians ?
    D'Angelico, D'Aquisto, Campellone, Monteleone. I love Italian guitars and Italian food too.

  18. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by sgosnell View Post
    Social Security and Medicare are not the same things.
    I know that, he already filed for Medicare. Just passing on an interesting article/perspective about SS.
    -- Isn't it crazy that "archtop" and "luthier" are spelling errors on this forum?

  19. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by vinnyv1k View Post
    Back to guitars....did you ever notice the best archtops are made by Italians ?
    D'Angelico, D'Aquisto, Campellone, Monteleone. I love Italian guitars and Italian food too.
    But the worst cars?
    -- Isn't it crazy that "archtop" and "luthier" are spelling errors on this forum?

  20. #19

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    market watch can't be trusted.

  21. #20

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    Happy 65th, Mark. Welcome to the official Guitar Geezers Gathering where GAS is a communal aspiration, whether intentional or not. And now to celebrate, how about a fresh round of 16 or 17 inch campies for those gathered here! Just kidding of course Best wishes for health and happiness on this day and all of your days.

  22. #21

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    Quote Originally Posted by sgosnell View Post
    You can begin drawing Social Security at any time after age 62, whether working or not. It's not necessarily a good idea, but it's possible and legal. I started at 66, my full retirement age, because I thought it was better for me. Everyone's situation is different, so don't make any decisions based on what I or anyone else did.

    Medicare Part (hospitalization) A is free, starting at age 65. Part B (doctors and other medical expenses) has to be paid, and that normally is deducted from one's social security check, but can be paid separately if not receiving social security checks. It costs ~135/month. That's usually less than one would pay a private insurance company, and with better coverage. However, if you're getting free health insurance from your employer, it is usually better to continue with that and delay Part B coverage until no longer employed, or covered by that insurance. There is a penalty for not getting Part B at age 65 unless you're covered by other insurance, and you have to present evidence of credible coverage from age 65 until enrolling in Part B. I had decent insurance from my employer, for both my wife and me, and the coverage for her was less than the Part B premiums. Not everyone gets that sort of coverage, though. If you're paying out of pocket, and it's more than ~$120/month for full coverage, then Medicare Part B is probably a better choice. You can also enroll in a Medicare Advantage plan which may cover Part D prescription drugs, for no additional premium, in exchange for being locked in to their HMO. We did that and are happy with it, but it's not the best for everyone.

    This is a serious decision with long-term implications, some of them lifetime, and I would certainly encourage anyone approaching age 65 to do a careful study and get all the information possible. The Medicare website, Medicare.gov: the official U.S. government site for Medicare | Medicare has the reliable information, but like most government info, can be hard to understand. You don't have to be eligible for medicare in order to sign up for an account, and to access the information. Start early and learn all you can before you turn 65, because it will affect your life for as long as you live. Again, social security and medicare are not the same things, although they do have some influences on each other.


    Yes, you can draw Social Security even though you're still working. At least for people my age, you can make all you want, but have to pay tax on a portion of your Social Security income, depending on the amount you earn. Whether it's a good idea to start drawing Social Security while still working is something you need to investigate, because it's not ideal for everyone. It is possible, though.

    Apologies for turning a Happy Birthday thread for Mark into a sermon.
    I knew there was a penalty for not signing up for Medicare Part A by three months before your 65th birthday, but I didn't know there was also a penalty for not signing up for Part B by the same time. Is that right, Deacon?

    Some of my older musician friends were so wasted by their day gigs, they started collecting SS at 62. I think they regret that now.
    Happy Birthday, Mark!

  23. #22

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    The penalty for not signing up for Part B is only if you have no other 'credible' insurance. Credible is defined by the government. It caused me to change my health insurance with my employer. I had been in a high-deductible HSA plan, which I liked, but Medicare said that was not a credible plan, so I had to change to a more traditional plan that charged premiums for the final few years or be considered without insurance and be charged a penalty when I signed up for Part B, and the penalty would be charged forever. I wasn't happy, but you can't fight city hall, nor DC. I paid for the traditional plan, and enrolled in Part B when I retired. Again, and I cannot stress this enough, read the medicare.gov information thoroughly and carefully. Regulations change, as do interpretations of existing regulations. If you don't understand something, ask someone you trust. You can also ask Medicare for an interpretation.

  24. #23
    Quote Originally Posted by Woody Sound View Post
    But the worst cars?
    I wouldn't mind a Ferrari to transport my Campellone guitar around in.

  25. #24

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    Quote Originally Posted by vinnyv1k View Post
    I wouldn't mind a Ferrari to transport my Campellone guitar around in.
    Have you ever driven one ? I did some years back , you would have difficulty getting
    in it, They're blisteringly quick but the cabin's like a sardine can , a guitar might just fit in
    I'll stick with my old German Banger thanks, It will take my ukelele comfortably

    007

  26. #25

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    Quote Originally Posted by vinnyv1k View Post
    Agreed Deacon Mark. I am not looking forward to the medical logistics I need to take care of when I retire. Lots of decisions and plans. Retirement.....one size does not fit all.

    Back to guitars....did you ever notice the best archtops are made by Italians ?
    D'Angelico, D'Aquisto, Campellone, Monteleone. I love Italian guitars and Italian food too.
    Shotguns, too! I don't own one or any gun for that matter, but I do always remember hearing about the works of art that some shotguns are and the best are made in Italy.

  27. #26
    Quote Originally Posted by silverfoxx View Post
    Have you ever driven one ? I did some years back , you would have difficulty getting
    in it, They're blisteringly quick but the cabin's like a sardine can , a guitar might just fit in
    I'll stick with my old German Banger thanks, It will take my ukelele comfortably

    007
    Never drove one. I walked into a Ferrari dealership once. I was quickly escorted out. I wasn’t wearing Versace. LOL....they spotted the bottom feeder immediately.

  28. #27

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    Quote Originally Posted by vinnyv1k View Post
    Never drove one. I walked into a Ferrari dealership once. I was quickly escorted out. I wasn’t wearing Versace. LOL....they spotted the bottom feeder immediately.
    In my 20's, I would have loved a Ferarri. I did have an 84 Vette that I bought in 85. While the vette was fun to drive (and an excellent pussy wagon), my mom and dad (who were both in their early 50's at the time) complained that getting in and out of the Vette was tough on their knees. At 61, I now feel their pain. I will take a large Alfa Romeo sedan over a Ferarri today (if I were to drive an Italian car).

    Happy 65th Mark Campellone! When it comes to archtops, Italian-Americans rule, both as makers and players.
    _____________________________________________
    "When the chord changes, you should change" Joe Pass

  29. #28

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    Quote Originally Posted by silverfoxx View Post
    Have you ever driven one ? I did some years back , you would have difficulty getting
    in it, They're blisteringly quick but the cabin's like a sardine can , a guitar might just fit in
    I'll stick with my old German Banger thanks, It will take my ukelele comfortably

    007
    All you need is an Aston Martin !?
    Make a jazz noise here

  30. #29

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    I’m a bit late to the party, but as the proud owner of two Campellones, I want to join in the birthday wishes. Happy 65th, Mark, and may you have many reasons to smile in the days ahead!
    Last edited by cmajor9; 09-02-2019 at 08:22 AM.

  31. #30

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    The monthly premium for Medicare part B is variable, depending on your income. It starts at $135.50 and goes up to $460.50.

    If you are carrying conventional Medicare, strongly consider getting a Medigap Plan G policy. It does not cover anything that Medicare doesn't cover, but it covers the 20% that Medicare Part B doesn't pay for. It does not cover the $185 Part B deductible, but it does cover Part A deductibles, which can be significant for a hospital stay. Medicare.gov has a ton of info on this, plus your states' SHIP office can help you analyze your own situation.

    You'll also need a part D drug plan. Besides comparing premiums for these plans, look up your meds in their coverage schedule for any gotchas.

    Danny W.

  32. #31

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    wow - mark campellone and midicare or medicaid - or whatever people without a public healthcare system call medical care

    you poor buggers - age, medical care and money - what a nightmare

    (isn't it obvious that) it should be part of living in a sophisticated and affluent society that everyone gets all the medical care they could possibly need without having to do anything - (except get ill or hurt)!? when we're rich enough, and we don't make sure that we all have access to the best possible medical care, we demonstrate that we don't really care about each other. how depressing.

    okay - this is important - but the connection with mark campellone is rather oblique

    i've had three mark campellone guitars and they were all wonderful. probably bought and sold all of them on this forum. they were a joy to own and play.

    happy birthday mark!

  33. #32

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    Quote Originally Posted by 339 in june View Post
    All you need is an Aston Martin !?
    like this one...
    Mark Campellone Guitars-acf452b4-5113-4cf1-9549-b7c3af43ab39-jpg