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  1. #1

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    anyone tried a recent L5 studio

    or a recent Eagle classic?
    Last edited by Groyniad; 08-24-2019 at 10:20 AM.

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    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #2

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    The Eagle Classic is generally an excellent instrument. The recent ones are very good. It costs less than the Golden Eagle due to less ornamentation basically. The basic elements are the same, including quality. The woods may be less figured but are carved the same.

    I can't comment on recent L5 Studios. I haven't even seen one.
    MG

  4. #3

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    Well, I looked at a couple on Reverb. The Studios don't look impressive to me. Personally I'd go for the Heritage. If the Studios had the same woods as the L-5CES and weren't painted, there could have been a contest.
    MG

  5. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by Marty Grass View Post
    Well, I looked at a couple on Reverb. The Studios don't look impressive to me. Personally I'd go for the Heritage. If the Studios had the same woods as the L-5CES and weren't painted, there could have been a contest.
    The old L5ces Studio models were great. They were L5ces without the bling. Standard tailpiece, dot fret markers, simpler binding, no headstock inlay, chrome hardware; but woods and construction were the same. Those, now, cost about what L5ces costs if you can find them.
    L5 studio or Heritage Eagle Classic at same price?-00700_tq-jpg
    - Lawson
    "Whenever you come near the human race, there's layers and layers of nonsense." - Thornton Wilder, Our Town

  6. #5

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    Here's what I found. Mahogany neck, rosewood fretboard. Sounds nice though.




    Compared to this:




    For those who want fretboard inlays, I strongly recommend this site. I've used blocks, trapezoids and dots. They are cheap, easy to apply, don't rub off, and look good enough.

    Inlay Stickers – They look like REAL inlay! For Guitar and Bass, Ukulele more…
    MG

  7. #6

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    The recent L5 Studio’s would have sold like hot cakes if they weren’t Army Green or Copper. Archtop lovers like traditional colors IMO.
    For that reason alone I would choose the Heritage.

  8. #7

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    i've never considered Heritage before

    but Rich Severson's videos have really struck me - its hard to hear past the strange settings on the musician's friend vids. i always find

    I'm very into the shallower body depth of the Heritage - 3'' seems perfect to me (less than that seems too thin etc. etc.)

    it sounds....lush man

    and I want something more lush than my current p90 175 (which is wonderful)

    and i like the lack of bling on the new eagle classics

    the idea that they are significantly hand made - hand carved - etc. is appealing too
    Last edited by Groyniad; 08-24-2019 at 02:43 PM.

  9. #8

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    I owned a late 1990s Heritage Golden Eagle, which lamentably I sold and have regretted every day of my life since. that was a splendid guitar, superbly built and a delight to play. I'd choose an Eagle Classic over the L5 Studio easily. And I'm a huge Gibson fan, too.
    - Lawson
    "Whenever you come near the human race, there's layers and layers of nonsense." - Thornton Wilder, Our Town

  10. #9

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    Wow, some Heritage love here! The Classic, hands down. Rich sold his in a heartbeat. Someone got a great guitar!
    "You've got to be in the sun to feel the sun. It's that way with music too." - Sidney Bechet

  11. #10

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    I recently offered a Blonde Heritage Golden Eagle for sale from the mid 90’s and its an extraordinary guitar. More like a post war L5 tone - that fat jazz sound. The body size is just under 17” lower bout x 3” body depth same as my Legrand’s.

    After after owning other Golden Eagles the 90’s Heritage builds are the best in my opinion. I actually decided to keep the guitar due to a complicated export - but will likely re- list it soon.

    If anyone is interested send me a pm - no worries with my guitars... they are hand picked gems.

  12. #11

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    It seems that Heritage have the legs on Gibson with the latest demo
    by Rich Severson , few will disagree with Vinny on the "Army Green"
    L5 Studio Gibsons, which are very unattractive, and devoid of the
    very necessary ornamentation making the model appealing to a
    prospective buyer, without it there is no class .

  13. #12

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    interesting how important aesthetic matters are - and a bit depressing i suppose

    even if that green guitar really did work just like a decent L5 - who would want to live with it?

    i know some are VERY negative about contemporary Heritage - the corporate revolution etc.

    does anyone have any reason to think that the new classics will be below established Heritage standards? - not hand made - not made in the right place etc.etc.?

  14. #13
    I remember Gibson mentioning that the Army Green was their best selling color on the semi hollow line (on a 2019 hollow body lineup video), so maybe that's why they did L5s in that color?

    I'd personally go for the Heritage between these two, but its difficult to decide unless you play the actual guitars..!

  15. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by Groyniad View Post
    i know some are VERY negative about contemporary Heritage - the corporate revolution etc.

    does anyone have any reason to think that the new classics will be below established Heritage standards? - not hand made - not made in the right place etc.etc.?
    I'm familiar with the Heritage plant.

    In the mid 1980s up until a few years ago, the outside of the Heritage factory building looked like it could have been in Mosul. The interior looked like a cross between Santa's workshop and a Vietnamese sweatshop. To the visitor it seemed disorganized. But the employees seemed comfortable with it all. There was only one PC in the factory for decades. Bookkeeping was an afterthought. There was no air conditioning. Ear muffs and modern ventilation were something other companies used, not there. Guitars were sprayed in the booth without masks. It was something to experience- the place modernity never found. This video shows the place when it was open to a large tour. I've been there many times as a single visitor informally. I could walk out on the floor pretty much unrestricted.



    A few years ago it began the process of modernization. The exterior of the building looks similar and the entrance downstairs is the same. But everything else is updated. There is a human to greet you upon entering. You don't have to hunt someone down. The place is cleaner. There's a waiting area and showroom where you can pick up the guitars and choose an amp to plug in to. There's no more wandering out into the production area without an escort. The factory is organized and has good ventilation and eye/ear protection- all that sissy stuff.

    The guitars are still basically made the same way. Some of the rough wood work is CNC, but all of the important carving is by hand. Quality is more consistent. The business and executive aspects are up to date.

    The down side is that the work spaces aren't as personalized. Customized options are much more expensive and thus uncommon. The product line has shrunk. There's more formality.

    You can't have both eras simultaneously. So given a choice, I liked the old way only because I live in Kalamazoo and could walk in most any time with a guitar for help. For the rest of the world, Heritage is generally better now. The Eagle Classics are more consistent, as are the other instruments.

    MG

  16. #15

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    thanks for that fascinating inside information Marty Grass - much appreciated

  17. #16

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    Not a single mention of an archtop. Bummer.
    "You've got to be in the sun to feel the sun. It's that way with music too." - Sidney Bechet

  18. #17

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    One needs play these instruments before buying. At least get a good return policy.
    That said, Gibson probably did solid colors to hide any wood imperfections. That's why they use to offer Black color guitars in the older days.

    I personally prefer Gibson's overall feel and aesthetic to most of Heritages offerings. But there are some Heritage guitars, that do look really good without too much bling.
    Gibson usually does thicker carved tops and usually a bit more pleasant neck shapes as well.But that's just a personal opinion.

  19. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by jads57 View Post
    One needs play these instruments before buying. At least get a good return policy.
    That said, Gibson probably did solid colors to hide any wood imperfections. That's why they use to offer Black color guitars in the older days.

    I personally prefer Gibson's overall feel and aesthetic to most of Heritages offerings. But there are some Heritage guitars, that do look really good without too much bling.
    Gibson usually does thicker carved tops and usually a bit more pleasant neck shapes as well.But that's just a personal opinion.
    Could not agree more, but Heritage Guitars are scarce in the UK , more so than Gibson Archtops. whose CEO has a one track mind
    concentrating on umpteen varieties of Les Paul, '59 specs,,ignoring would be purchasers of their previously excellent quality Crimson
    Custom Shop guitars (,but at a reasonable price. )There seems to be little likelihood of that pipe dream being resurrected

  20. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by lawson-stone View Post
    The old L5ces Studio models were great. They were L5ces without the bling. Standard tailpiece, dot fret markers, simpler binding, no headstock inlay, chrome hardware; but woods and construction were the same. Those, now, cost about what L5ces costs if you can find them.
    L5 studio or Heritage Eagle Classic at same price?-00700_tq-jpg
    I had an L-5Studio that looked like the one in this picture. It was gorgeous, played great, sounded great, and was easy to sell. However, most of them did NOT look like this. The came in various colours, with a different, fugly tailpiece, and with very strange-coloured pickguards. FWIW, they all came with laminated backs, not carved backs.

    The updated version has a much nicer tailpiece and a carved back. Whoever picked the colours is an idjit.
    "Somebody get me out of this chair." - BOB WILLS
    Hammertone is a registered Hofnerologist.

  21. #20

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    Does anyone have reason to think that the new classics are less hand carved than they used to be?