1. #1

    User Info Menu

    I'm a little slow when it comes to pedals. (i.e. I don't use them). I have always added EQ in my DAW after recording tracks, but now want to use EQ in my live sound - so I have a newby question. (My guitar doesn't have a tone control so that makes that part easy).


    Q: What settings should I use with my amp tone settings? (Treble, Mid, Bass). In other words, it seems logical that some fixed baseline be used in order to minimize an endless number of variables. Should I set them all at half-way for example?


    (I play a Gibson LeGrand and use a George Benson Fender tube amp. I have a MXR EQ pedal).

    Thanks in advance!

  2.  

    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #2

    User Info Menu

    I use a Empress Parametric so it may be a bit different. I've ended up setting the amps I've used it with flat. I put it in the effects loop. I feel it allows me to 'voice' the amp anyway I like. So I'd say everything at 5 sounds right to me.

    Sometimes I've made small adjustments to the amp settings after I've done the main EQ with the pedal.

  4. #3

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by Jazzstdnt View Post
    I'm a little slow when it comes to pedals. (i.e. I don't use them). I have always added EQ in my DAW after recording tracks, but now want to use EQ in my live sound - so I have a newby question. (My guitar doesn't have a tone control so that makes that part easy).


    Q: What settings should I use with my amp tone settings? (Treble, Mid, Bass). In other words, it seems logical that some fixed baseline be used in order to minimize an endless number of variables. Should I set them all at half-way for example?


    (I play a Gibson LeGrand and use a George Benson Fender tube amp. I have a MXR EQ pedal).

    Thanks in advance!
    Which Benson amp, the Twin or the HR Deluxe? Either way, start with the tone controls set flat. On the Twin, that's with the bass and treble both rolled down to 1 and the mid at 5. On the HR, I believe flat is with all controls halfway up. Then EQ to taste, and to deal with whatever is going on in the room and with the hand.

    It's tough to make specific recommendations in the abstract, though. No matter what you do with your EQ and tone controls, you're playing through a speaker and cabinet, in a room, so there's really no such thing as "flat" in the real world.

    John

  5. #4

    User Info Menu


  6. #5

    User Info Menu

    I would say 1) eq amp to taste 2) use eq pedal to adjust what you couldn't adjust on the previous step

  7. #6

    User Info Menu

    Tube amps have interactive tone controls. Tone controls affect later stages (gain, feedback loop etc.) as well has how the amp responds.
    For example Bass knob on Deluxe Reverb changes mid characteristics as well as the bass levels. Treble knob moves the mid scoop like a parametric EQ (sweeps the scoop from low mids to high mids) as well as adding high mids and presence. The more you turn them up, the less signal is grounded, which changes the headroom and amp dynamics.
    The way I look at it is this. In a tube amp tone controls aren't simply EQ. You obtain different flavors of the same amp by changing the tone controls. Find the flavor you like and adjust with an EQ pedal.
    I got my DR last year and I first tried turning the bass and treble all the way down to obtain a flat eq. Now I realize that, that's an extreme setting that sounds like shit. It's lifeless. Now I set bass to 7, treble to 4, then cut the bass around 100hz with an EQ pedal a bit. That avoids boomy bass but introduces some nice low mids. It doesn't have much scoop. There is always option to also cut some treble with the EQ too. Alternatively, I use a tubescreamer pedal with gain at 0 to get more or less the same effect (tubescreamer -> DR with bass 7-8, treble 4-5).
    Tubescreamer is a must have with non-tweed Fender's IMO. They do wonders.
    It takes a pretty good drummer to be better than no drummer at all. -- Chet Baker

  8. #7

    User Info Menu

    What we call sound is an equation between a source (your guitar + your pedals i.e. EQ + your amp + your cabinet), a medium (air in a room, or eventually outside) and a receiver (your ears, o anyelse ears). You can't get any control over the room (unless you are the architect) nor over your ears. So, EQ is basically a tool for modifying your source according to the room's response and fooling your ears. Practice, and LISTEN...
    And of course, each room has its own response so there is absolutely no "standard" or "universal" EQ. You'll need to tweak your EQ each time you play in a different room.
    Last edited by Pierrot; 08-21-2019 at 01:59 AM.

  9. #8

    User Info Menu

    I set my amp,s as close to the sound I want then if needed I adjust my EQ if the bass needs more boost or trebles or mids. I also ajuust the EQ volume so I get more Boost when I turn it on get some more decibels. I guess I should look into a volume pedal. But I allways put it first in the order of my pedals.

  10. #9

    User Info Menu

    I think you have to decide, in advance, how you want your guitar to sound.

    I'd suggest thinking about how a particular sound might complement your style.

    Then, budget a few hours and twist every knob.

    I like to put my amp away from where I'm sitting, so try to adjust it at the beginning of a gig in a way that won't require me to touch it again. And, then all the other adjustments are to taste. It will change with the room, the audience, the other band members and with variations in your own perception. You can't find a setting and weld it.