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  1. #1

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    I have a recently acquired Heritage Johnny Smith archtop guitar that has small nylon washers between the thumbwheels and the saddle. I haven’t seen this before on other archtops and I was wondering if anyone on the forum has seen this before. It would seem like a temporary fix for a problem where the floating bridge has run out of height adjustment, but that doesn’t seem to be the case for this guitar. When I get around to a string change I might remove them to see if they are affecting the tone detrimentally. My guess is that they wouldn’t be tone robbers because you still have the threaded posts conducting vibrations from the saddle to the base.

    Come to think of it, this guitar had the fretboard planed above the 9th fret to correct tongue rise, so perhaps the washers are a remnant to get around that problem and were never removed after the rise was corrected. Just wondering.

    Thanks,

    Bill

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  3. #2

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Eisele View Post
    My guess is that they wouldn’t be tone robbers because you still have the threaded posts conducting vibrations from the saddle to the base.
    The saddle is sitting on the wheels so threaded posts only conduct vibrations that are transferred to the wheels from the saddle. My guess is that those nylon washers will have a big effect on tone depending on how thick they are. The are absorbing some of the vibrations. It means less volume and sustain, limited feedback from the body to strings for pickups to detect, some eq and overtone changes etc.

  4. #3

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    I would be getting rid of those nylon washer in a heartbeat. No place for them on the saddle and bridge or something is/was wrong. Sounds like the planning maybe be the reason and washers were set on to raise action. Wow is that stupid.
    specializing in repair and setup, does your guitar play like it should?

  5. #4

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    Also the fact that they used nylon washers instead of metal washers means either the tone change was intentional or they didn't know what they were doing.

  6. #5

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    It will be different without them and probably better. BUT... it's not necessarily a slam dunk. The washers will probably act as insulators between the saddle and the thumbwheels, and hence between the saddle and the bridge/body. But a net effect of that should be to concentrate more vibration energy between the nut and saddle. And that could, stress could, result in more sustain, not less.

    Again, I would be skeptical about keeping them on there, but listen with a critical ear when you A/B the difference.
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  7. #6

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    Nylon has much lower acoustic impedance than wood. I doubt having the nylon washers would increase sustain. The current bridge will absorb vibrations more readily than nylon not being there.

  8. #7

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    So.. almost all the vibration is going from saddle to posts to base to top. Isn't vibration to the thumb wheels pretty much wasted anyway? Or do we think the thumb wheels with their additional mass change how the posts resonate? Not sure if you could actually hear the difference or not. Maybe. Now I'm going to have to try it to see.
    Hell is full of musical amateurs - George Bernard Shaw

  9. #8

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    I think one can best think of the string energy going from the saddle to the wheels then to the posts.

    The saddle rests on the wheels. The saddle has some incidental contact to the posts.

    So yes, the washers are in the serial stress (and energy and vibration) path from the string to the top.

    But nylon is hardly a disaster in this situation. There is the mass of the nylon which is low and inconsequential.

    If anyone feels that the washers somehow resonate amd that this has an effect on the sound, that would seem nearly impossible in any practical way.

    I suppose adding tungsten washers could be argued to make some difference (adding mass to the bridge assembly) but in a blind A/B it would be also inconsequential.

    Some feel that nylon individual saddles on a t-o-m make a difference vs. brass or zinc or “base metal”, but that is in a far more critical situation than a relatively large washer surface between the bridge assembly and the wheels.

    So sure, take the washers out only because they seem silly. But do not expect any actual sound difference unless you deeply feel the need to perceive such a difference.

  10. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by ptchristopher3 View Post
    I think one can best think of the string energy going from the saddle to the wheels then to the posts.

    The saddle rests on the wheels. The saddle has some incidental contact to the posts.

    So yes, the washers are in the serial stress (and energy and vibration) path from the string to the top.

    But nylon is hardly a disaster in this situation. There is the mass of the nylon which is low and inconsequential.

    If anyone feels that the washers somehow resonate amd that this has an effect on the sound, that would seem nearly impossible in any practical way.

    I suppose adding tungsten washers could be argued to make some difference (adding mass to the bridge assembly) but in a blind A/B it would be also inconsequential.

    Some feel that nylon individual saddles on a t-o-m make a difference vs. brass or zinc or “base metal”, but that is in a far more critical situation than a relatively large washer surface between the bridge assembly and the wheels.

    So sure, take the washers out only because they seem silly. But do not expect any actual sound difference unless you deeply feel the need to perceive such a difference.
    Pt I disagree completely with the sound being the same. Would love to have the guitar and we could see right before our own ears. The saddle should sit right on the wheels of the bridge and be very metal. The string going over the top of the saddle on nylon, metal, or wood is a different question and produces different results which may not all be that different.
    specializing in repair and setup, does your guitar play like it should?

  11. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by ptchristopher3 View Post
    I think one can best think of the string energy going from the saddle to the wheels then to the posts.

    The saddle rests on the wheels. The saddle has some incidental contact to the posts.

    So yes, the washers are in the serial stress (and energy and vibration) path from the string to the top.

    But nylon is hardly a disaster in this situation. There is the mass of the nylon which is low and inconsequential.

    If anyone feels that the washers somehow resonate amd that this has an effect on the sound, that would seem nearly impossible in any practical way.

    I suppose adding tungsten washers could be argued to make some difference (adding mass to the bridge assembly) but in a blind A/B it would be also inconsequential.

    Some feel that nylon individual saddles on a t-o-m make a difference vs. brass or zinc or “base metal”, but that is in a far more critical situation than a relatively large washer surface between the bridge assembly and the wheels.

    So sure, take the washers out only because they seem silly. But do not expect any actual sound difference unless you deeply feel the need to perceive such a difference.
    I also disagree completely. As you say, nylon washers are in direct path of vibrations. Nylon as being an elastic object, is not a good and efficient medium for vibrations to pass through. Mass is not the issue, it's stiffness to mass ratio is the concern for acoustics. Nylon is the opposite of stiff. It's good at absorbing vibrations, not transferring them.
    Last edited by Tal_175; 07-23-2019 at 08:37 PM.

  12. #11

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    Waiting to hear the results............

    Hurry up, so I can start marketing nylon bridge parts, especially ones that get in the way and dampen energy transference. I'll charge more for "vintage spec".

    Seriously though, every part in the bridge system plays a role in energy transference and very often - tone. I did some experimenting with a semi-hollow body guitar, and changed posts, stop bars, saddles, TOM bridge body, and in many cases, trying materials made of different metals (no nylon) and I was amazed at some of the results, not all of them desirable. But hey, there could be a place for nylon parts. My Johnny Smith (Gibson '65) did not suit me at all for tone and response - I should have tried some nylon, maybe that could have warmed it up and smoothed it out ???

  13. #12

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    Question, which would result in a bumpier ride:
    a) Rubber tyres.
    b) Metal tyres.

    The reason the obvious answer is "b" is because rubber is not a good medium for vibrations and impact to travel through.

  14. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Eisele View Post
    Come to think of it, this guitar had the fretboard planed above the 9th fret to correct tongue rise, so perhaps the washers are a remnant to get around that problem and were never removed after the rise was corrected. Just wondering.
    i think that's your answer....they probably used the washers to get the bridge saddle up a bit higher to avoid any high fret buzzing...and once the problem was fixed (^ planed) they probably just left the washers in place

    i've also seen washers placed between the thumbwheel and the bridge base...in an effort to thwart the saddle and posts from bending towards the guitar body under string tension

    cheers

  15. #14

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    Although the question here is how stiff are the nylon washers. Some nylon can be very stiff (like the ones that are used to make picks). Still even a stiff nylon would be too soft for this purpose.

  16. #15

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    I'd deffo get rid of the nylon washers .... Yuck !

    (some people even use nylon strings apparently ... Yuck)

  17. #16

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    I have seen nylon washers used under saddles on many different guitars over the past 38 years of handling Archtops - and actually on quite a few Heritage guitars. The Golden Eagle I just sold has them - and the tone was great, but may have been different without them.

    If I hadnt seen them used before on a Heritage I probably would have pulled them off. Keep in mind - a Heritage guitar usually has a steep neck angle which necessitates a higher stance on the bridge posts. I once had a sweet sixteen I brought to John Monteleone to correct tail rise and he took one look at the bridge and said " its a piece of ......and has to go".

    With no disrepect to Heritage owners, they did not always leave the factory with a great set up - or great fret work for that matter. It really depended upon who set them up. Marty Grass would know more about this im sure.

    I believe on the narrow saddles they were used to make up height and or possibly stabilize the saddle from being pulled out of square to the base - especially if the post holes were too large.

    My Borys B120 brass wheels actually contain an integral shoulder above the wheel, which measures the width of saddle - and is obviously intentional.

    No new builder I know would intentionally add a loose washer as part of the build plan. But maybe Heritage had reasons which go beyond this discussion.

    In any case, you can just remove them and splice on a strip of ebony along the bottom if it bothers you, or have a new saddle made......its really not a big problem to correct.

    Sent from my GT-N5110 using Tapatalk

  18. #17

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    I see no need for washers to raise the saddle. It's easier to just turn the wheels an extra turn or so. If you're running out of post, unscrew them a turn or three. The washers are not at all necessary for raising the saddle. I tend to agree with ptchristopher, I don't expect much difference in tone. Having the washers there does make it easier to adjust the wheels, giving some ease of movement when they are turned. I don't know if that's the reason they were added, but it is one benefit. In any case, it's not rocket science to remove them, and there is no need to pay a famous luthier to have it done. If you're worried about them, remove them and see if it sounds better. I doubt there is a detectable difference, but I could be wrong. I would experiment if I had any nylon washers handy, but I don't, and it's not worth buying some just for this.

  19. #18

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    Here is a pic of my Borys B120 wheel.


  20. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by QAman View Post
    Here is a pic of my Borys B120 wheel.

    That seems to me like a metal washer which I believe is a more sensible material for this purpose than nylon.

  21. #20

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    Yes, if you're going to use a washer, (and I see no reason to in most cases) metal probably makes more sense most of the time. I don't think that's really in question. The question seems to be whether it's absolutely essential to remove the ones that are on the subject guitar. I don't think it is, but if the OP disagrees, it's simple to do that. Being the inveterate tinkerer that I am, I would remove them and see whether it affects the sound, and how much, and whether it makes adjusting the wheels easier. After experimenting, I would then decide whether to keep them. I don't know of a better way to find out.

  22. #21

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tal_175 View Post
    That seems to me like a metal washer which I believe is a more sensible material for this purpose than nylon.
    It’s purpose may just be functional - to assist with the ease of moving wheel, in which case nylon would serve that purpose . But what affect it has on tone can only be determined through experimenting.

    I’ll give Roger a call to find out his reason for having this shoulder.

  23. #22

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    Quote Originally Posted by sgosnell View Post
    Yes, if you're going to use a washer, (and I see no reason to in most cases) metal probably makes more sense most of the time. I don't think that's really in question. The question seems to be whether it's absolutely essential to remove the ones that are on the subject guitar. I don't think it is, but if the OP disagrees, it's simple to do that.
    For me the question was always about the potential effect of the washers to the tone. So the washer being made of nylon is the reason why I think it's a bad idea. Metal washer wouldn't affect the tone. If it was a metal washer it would be moot point.

  24. #23

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    If one thinks about it, a washer will not raise the actual potential maximum height of the bridge. The bridge height is limited by the post height and the need for the post to extend slightly into the bridge.

    Washers do not affect this. You can have 1mm of post extending into the bridge saddle via a wheel 1 mm below the top of the post or a wheel 3 mm below the top and a 2mm washer.

    As for the dramatic tone difference caused by the apparently staggeringly rubbery nylon, I leave that to those more given to imagination-enhanced experiences.

  25. #24

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    Yeah to some nylon, metal, wood etc. they are all the same. To others stiffness of the bridge mechanism is an important consideration. Even subtle stiffness difference between bone and plastic (even a type of plastic that's much stiffer than a nylon washer) can be heard clearly:

  26. #25

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tal_175 View Post
    Yeah to some nylon, metal, wood etc. they are all the same. To others stiffness of the bridge mechanism is an important consideration. Even subtle stiffness difference between bone and plastic (even a type of plastic that's much stiffer than a nylon washer) can be heard clearly: [...]
    Certainly agreed that materials can make a major difference.

    Here however we are talking about two very specific ideas:

    1. The washers somehow allow a different final bridge height - yet this is actually determined by the post height.

    2. The washers will have a notable effect on “tone” - which is possible, but far less likely in the configuration in question vs. other situations. For example an actual brass (as opposed to zinc or base metal) vs. nylon t-o-m saddle can present a consistent difference, but it is subtle, and in a far more critical position than the flat washers in question.

  27. #26

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    I use a nylon saddle for just the high E on a t-o-m bridge, and can barely (maybe almost) feel that it knocks the edge of the plink-y-ness off the high E string sometimes.

    But this effect is extremely small, at best. And that is with the saddle in direct contact with the string over a very small contact patch - which would very much increase the effect of any practical elasticity n the nylon.

  28. #27

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    Quote Originally Posted by ptchristopher3 View Post
    I use a nylon saddle for just the high E on a t-o-m bridge, and can barely (maybe almost) feel that it knocks the edge of the plink-y-ness off the high E string sometimes.

    But this effect is extremely small, at best. And that is with the saddle in direct contact with the string over a very small contact patch - which would very much increase the effect of any practical elasticity n the nylon.
    There is nylon and there is nylon. The nylon used to make saddles are designed for this purpose and built to be stiff. Nylon washers are completely different material and not designed for stiffness. I also think the washers are placed in a critical location. All string impact is SOLELY passing through these washers and the material they are made of. I don't know how subtle or obvious the difference will be, but I'd be surprised if it's not easily noticeable.
    If people can hear the difference between rosewood and ebony bridges, they should be able to hear the difference between rosewood vs rosewood/nylon mechanism.

  29. #28

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tal_175 View Post
    There is nylon and there is nylon. The nylon used to make saddles are designed for this purpose and built to be stiff. Nylon washers are completely different material and not designed for stiffness. I also think the washers are placed in a critical location. All string impact is SOLELY passing through these washers and the material they are made of. I don't know how subtle or obvious the difference will be, but I'd be surprised if it's not easily noticeable.
    If people can hear the difference between rosewood and ebony bridges, they should be able to hear the difference between rosewood vs rosewood/nylon mechanism.
    I understand. In my experience, the perceived sound difference between rosewood and ebony is overwhelmingly based on the difference in mass.

  30. #29

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    Logic does not easily affect one who already has his mind made up and closed.

  31. #30

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    Thanks all for your thoughtful responses. From what I can tell at this point, there is sufficient adjustment in the posts to ditch the washers. I assume this was not the case prior to the planing. But as QAman said, he has seen these washers on several Heritage guitars. So I’m wondering if that’s the way the guitar came from the factory to correct some setup issue from the start.

    Regardless, I did find a source for ebony washers if the washers are necessary (e.g., post leaning with the saddle up too high): Ebony Washers (Pair).

    If I had sensitive enough recording equipment I might consider recording a track with the nylon washers in place, without the washers, and with ebony washer and posting them to the forum for you to hear. But I wonder how much a difference would be discernible even in person. The guitar is very lively now but perhaps improvements could be made.

    And, I wonder how common fretboard planing is to correct fret buzz? Typically all that is needed is a fret level in that area of the fretboard.

  32. #31

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    As mentioned above, washers on top of the wheels will not permit raising the saddle any higher, nor will they correct lean. If you have a problem with the saddle being very high and leaning because the posts are tilting, then another set of wheels, snug against the base, will help.

    Planing isn't too uncommon, I don't think. Some fretboards are so high in the upper fret regions that fret leveling won't get the job done, because there would be little or no fret left. Ski jumps aren't all that common, but if there is one, planing is really the only remedy that I know of.

  33. #32

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Eisele View Post

    And, I wonder how common fretboard planing is to correct fret buzz? Typically all that is needed is a fret level in that area of the fretboard.
    it's the last step a lot of guys try, before a complete neck reset...tho in honesty, 90% of the serious trouble(not talking abt regular set-up) with action on guitars is neck angle...so if the neck was reset first... before... the planing and even fretwork might not have been required...chances are the actual neck work was done correctly (most guitar factories are trying to get it right!) but the neck moved after the guitar was completed..and there's myriad reasons why necks can move..from too tight cases, bad glue to getting bounced around in shipping etc etc

    cheers

  34. #33

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    Quote Originally Posted by sgosnell View Post
    As mentioned above, washers on top of the wheels will not permit raising the saddle any higher, nor will they correct lean. If you have a problem with the saddle being very high and leaning because the posts are tilting, then another set of wheels, snug against the base, will help.

    Planing isn't too uncommon, I don't think. Some fretboards are so high in the upper fret regions that fret leveling won't get the job done, because there would be little or no fret left. Ski jumps aren't all that common, but if there is one, planing is really the only remedy that I know of.
    I was in the middle of composing my response and attending to some other things while the posts about the washers not being able to raise the saddle further or correct leaning came in. So, if there’s a leaning problem I will install an extra set of wheels against the base. So, it would seem based on some of the posts that the washers are there to make it easier to turn the thumbwheels. I will probably remove the washers during the next string change to see if there’s a noticeable tonal difference and if there’s any problems turning the thumbwheels without the washers.

    The planing job was done well with just a tiny bit of finish missing from the neck just adjacent to the binding in one spot and a black line running in the middle of the binding looking a little wobbly in places. The major tell tale sign that something was done is the absence of the binding nibs on either side of the frets in that area. But those would be missing with a mere fret level.

  35. #34

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    Quote Originally Posted by neatomic View Post
    it's the last step a lot of guys try, before a complete neck reset...tho in honesty, 90% of the serious trouble(not talking abt regular set-up) with action on guitars is neck angle...so if the neck was reset first... before... the planing and even fretwork might not have been required...chances are the actual neck work was done correctly (most guitar factories are trying to get it right!) but the neck moved after the guitar was completed..and there's myriad reasons why necks can move..from too tight cases, bad glue to getting bounced around in shipping etc etc

    cheers
    I will be taking the guitar to the repair technician very soon to address some other issues, so I will have him look at the neck joint to see if there are any remaining issues to be addressed in that area. Hopefully none. Thanks for the heads up!

  36. #35

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    Quote Originally Posted by sgosnell View Post
    Logic does not easily affect one who already has his mind made up and closed.
    Moment of self reflection?

  37. #36

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    Quote Originally Posted by QAman View Post
    Here is a pic of my Borys B120 wheel.

    On a side note I like the smoothed off saddle end on that Borys
    I smoothed/rounded the rosewood saddle ends on my guitars too ...
    Makes it more comfortable to palm mute Etc

    carry on ....

  38. #37

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    It's possible the nylon washers were just there to make it easier to turn the thumbwheels.
    Beauty is as close to terror as we can well endure. -Rainer Maria Rilke

  39. #38

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cunamara View Post
    It's possible the nylon washers were just there to make it easier to turn the thumbwheels.
    Quite possibly -

  40. #39

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tal_175 View Post
    That seems to me like a metal washer which I believe is a more sensible material for this purpose than nylon.
    It probably has a brass thread stem not just a washer. Gibson 59 VOS 175's had the brass stem/washer which made the saddle fit very tight on the stems with no slop.

  41. #40

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    Quote Originally Posted by vinnyv1k View Post
    It probably has a brass thread stem not just a washer. Gibson 59 VOS 175's had the brass stem/washer which made the saddle fit very tight on the stems with no slop.
    Here’s a couple photos of the threaded posts with the thumbwheel and washer. Kind of hard to see the posts in the photos. But, as others are surmising, the washers could be there to make the thumbwheels easier to turn.
    Attached Images Attached Images Nylon Washers Between Thumbwheels and Saddle?-de2773de-8c2a-4c0b-a68f-b25f50178f41-jpg Nylon Washers Between Thumbwheels and Saddle?-b124f629-9c8f-4ed1-bd7d-009b4d07f1f2-jpg 

  42. #41

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    They don't need to be there to raise the saddle, the wheels are about as low as they can go, and could be raised without problems. I have no idea why they are there. Perhaps the previous owner preferred the tone with them installed. People have very different tastes. Or maybe they make it easier to turn the wheels. Anything is possible, I guess. I would be interested in hearing the difference in sound with and without them, or at least your impression of the difference, if any.

  43. #42

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    BTW if I just wanna remove the saddle, I secure the bridge with electrical tape so it doesn't slide out of position when the strings get loose. Or I just put two small pieces of electric tape just behind the bridge on both ends (treble and bass) to mark the position so I can put the bridge exactly where it was (If I'm not changing string gauge). I don't know how you guys do it, but I find electrical tape very easy to remove without any damage to the finish.

  44. #43

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    This thread has a lot of activity.

    As a generality, Heritage archtops back in the day had as their best features the build, woods, and finish. Fretting, hardware placement, setups, and soldering was not consistently great. Tool marks on the fretboard were very common.

    Most of us expected to do a full setup and some slotting work on a new guitar.

    Soft bushings between the saddle and wheels must change the tone to some degree. Maybe you like it and maybe not. Let's assume you don't like it or you don't like the looks or idea of it. It's not hard to get another bridge base and fit it to the top.
    MG

  45. #44

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    43 posts of assumptions can't beat first hand experience, try removing the washers.
    Removing the nylon washers on a bridge is not rocket science and certainly doesn't require to change the bridge base.
    The thumb wheels are still low and would not sit so high on the post once the nylon washers are gone.
    I have brass inserts washers on my 1959 125 full rosewood bridge, they were originally missing when I got the guitar and I could source original ones on Ebay.
    Can't tell much difference between before and after the brass insert!
    Last edited by vinlander; 07-26-2019 at 10:51 AM.
    ...every note has an origin and a destination...
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  46. #45

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    I find electrical tape to be a little messy, leaving sticky residue. I use blue painter's tape (masking tape, but cleaner) instead. It's cheaper and neater, doesn't leave anything on the top. But whatever works...

    I've suggested removing the washers and seeing what the difference is. Doing that is not rocket science, nor even complicated luthiery. One question I have about the guitar in question is what the black between the wheels and the washers is. It may be part of the wheels, with a flange on one side, or it might be a second set of washers. I can't tell from the upside down photos, even after turning my laptop upside down. It's not important, just curiosity, but if the wheels have small flanges, that might explain the need for the nylon washers, to make it easier to adjust the wheels, because the small flanges could dig into the saddle, maybe, possibly, dunno. The only way to find out is to remove the saddle, and it's not my saddle. If it were, it would have been removed long ago, and possibly reassembled as is, or maybe without any extra pieces, depending on how it sounded. I tend to prefer simpler over complicated, all things being otherwise equal, so I might ditch the washers, but you never know until you try.

  47. #46

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    Quote Originally Posted by sgosnell View Post
    I find electrical tape to be a little messy, leaving sticky residue. I use blue painter's tape (masking tape, but cleaner) instead. It's cheaper and neater, doesn't leave anything on the top. But whatever works...

    I've suggested removing the washers and seeing what the difference is. Doing that is not rocket science, nor even complicated luthiery. One question I have about the guitar in question is what the black between the wheels and the washers is. It may be part of the wheels, with a flange on one side, or it might be a second set of washers. I can't tell from the upside down photos, even after turning my laptop upside down. It's not important, just curiosity, but if the wheels have small flanges, that might explain the need for the nylon washers, to make it easier to adjust the wheels, because the small flanges could dig into the saddle, maybe, possibly, dunno. The only way to find out is to remove the saddle, and it's not my saddle. If it were, it would have been removed long ago, and possibly reassembled as is, or maybe without any extra pieces, depending on how it sounded. I tend to prefer simpler over complicated, all things being otherwise equal, so I might ditch the washers, but you never know until you try.
    The photos are deceiving. When I looked at them I also saw what looked to be either a second set of washers or a flange on one side of the wheels. It caught me off guard to the point where I went back and closely examined that area of the guitar. There’s nothing extra there. Just the flat wheels and one set of washers.

    I will record something with the washers in place and then without this weekend and post them to this thread. I would have done it sooner once I started the thread, but I hadn’t been feeling well after receiving my second dose of the Shingrex vaccine. Not sure if anyone else had the same experience getting the vaccine but it felt like the full blown flu and it lasted for many days.

  48. #47

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    I highly, highly doubt that anyone will hear a difference from a recording.

    You, however, may hear or feel a difference as a player. Such is the case for a great many of the minutiae elements that we musicians obsess over. Our own perceptions when actually playing the instrument are truly all that matter.
    Permanent favorites: 2016 Gibson L-5 WesMo, 1999 Gibson L-5CESN, 1928 Gibson L-5
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  49. #48

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    Quote Originally Posted by rpguitar View Post
    I highly, highly doubt that anyone will hear a difference from a recording.

    You, however, may hear or feel a difference as a player. Such is the case for a great many of the minutiae elements that we musicians obsess over. Our own perceptions when actually playing the instrument are truly all that matter.
    Especially true with my iPad/free Spire app and file compression. Not a state of the art recording chain to be sure.

  50. #49

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    I had the Shingrix vaccine a year or so ago, and felt no ill effects other than a slight soreness at the injection site for a day or two. I think that if you have a reaction to a vaccine, ir's probably because you needed it.

  51. #50

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    Not much to add, but here's what I think;
    At some point in time someone replaced the wooden saddle with a metal bridge for intonation purposes. The Nylon washers cut some highs, making the acoustic tone closer to the original wooden bridge. When the wooden bridge was restored the washers were accidently left.
    I bet there won't be much difference in the amplified tone, but I guess you'll notice a difference in the acoustic tone.