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  1. #1

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    I like adding octave-below for soloing.

    But, it sounds better in the upper register than the lower register, unsurprisingly.

    Do any of the pedals permit control of that? That is, can I get the lower octave on the higher notes with less of it on the lower notes? Do any of the pedals have an adjustment for that?

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  3. #2

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    Good question! The Boss OC-3 can do the opposite: you set a frequency and it drops notes *below* it an octave, for a fake bass effect.

    Build bridges, not walls.

  4. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by rpjazzguitar View Post
    I like adding octave-below for soloing.

    But, it sounds better in the upper register than the lower register, unsurprisingly.

    Do any of the pedals permit control of that? That is, can I get the lower octave on the higher notes with less of it on the lower notes? Do any of the pedals have an adjustment for that?
    If any pedal has this capability, it would be the Eventide. They are the best harmonizers on the market. I don't know if it does specifically what you ask, but if IT doesn't, I doubt anything does.


    H9 | Eventide Harmonizer(R) Effects Pedal

    Otherwise, maybe some octave pedal has have expression pedal control?... meaning, you plug an expression pedal into the octaver, then you can control the mix with your foot... it's one more pedal and one more step, but I've never heard of anything that does what you're asking "automatically".

  5. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by rpjazzguitar View Post
    I like adding octave-below for soloing.

    But, it sounds better in the upper register than the lower register, unsurprisingly.

    Do any of the pedals permit control of that? That is, can I get the lower octave on the higher notes with less of it on the lower notes? Do any of the pedals have an adjustment for that?
    To be clear, you want to know if there's a pedal that detects the pitch of the dry signal and varies the level of the octave effect according to the pitch? I don't think any octave divider pedal can do exactly that. If I'm understanding the instructions for the EHX POG correctly, you can set the frequency at which the octave effect kicks in, which might be useful. Beyond that, maybe a digital harmonizer can be programmed to vary the level by frequency? The closest you can get might be to use an octave pedal that splits the dry and octave signals, and put a volume pedal on the octave signal. You could then play through two amps, or two inputs of one amp and vary the level of the octave signal man -- I mean pedal-ly. Or hire a bassist ...

    John

    PS -- all I know for sure is that the Boss OC-2 I've got doesn't do any of that fancy stuff and tracks/sounds like crap. Wanna buy it?

  6. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by John A. View Post
    To be clear, you want to know if there's a pedal that detects the pitch of the dry signal and varies the level of the octave effect according to the pitch? I don't think any octave divider pedal can do exactly that. If I'm understanding the instructions for the EHX POG correctly, you can set the frequency at which the octave effect kicks in, which might be useful. Beyond that, maybe a digital harmonizer can be programmed to vary the level by frequency? The closest you can get might be to use an octave pedal that splits the dry and octave signals, and put a volume pedal on the octave signal. You could then play through two amps, or two inputs of one amp and vary the level of the octave signal man -- I mean pedal-ly. Or hire a bassist ...

    John

    PS -- all I know for sure is that the Boss OC-2 I've got doesn't do any of that fancy stuff and tracks/sounds like crap. Wanna buy it?
    That's an idea! The octave pedal outputs wet and dry signals (or you split before the pedal). Take the wet (octave down) signal and EQ it with a shelving EQ that drops the signal below a set frequency. Done!

    EDIT: ... but then isn't there a psycho-acoustic phenomena that if you take a note, decompose its signal into overtones and remove the fundamental, the brain still hears the original pitch of the note? It's as if the brain reinserts the fundamental frequency. It still may be worth trying -- I wonder if the result is less "boomy".
    Build bridges, not walls.

  7. #6

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    Hexaphonic pickup. Send top three to one octave pedal (ocatve below) send the lower three strings to a second octave pedal (octave above) then mix them together with a compact mixer pedal or use two amps for stereo effect. Or use some pitch to voltage system (MIDI or Synth) pickup. Once you have the six strings output in the voltage domain, you can do any thing to them and mix it back to the dry side.

    Octave pedal question-hex-b-jpg