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  1. #1

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    This is a very provocative video.


    MG

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    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #2

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    MG

  4. #3

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    Looks to me like he may have replaced feeling false advancement through shopping (instead of playing) with the false feeling from getting "likes" making talky videos (instead of playing).

    I'm not defending guitar acquisition syndrome; it is particularly insidious for those who begin as teens lacking impulse control, or those for whom the underlying drive stems from a kind of hubris (self evaluation overstatement of their talent and corresponding instruments' requirements).
    "Bent my ear to hear the tune and closed my eyes to see."

  5. #4

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    Yeah Well ... This kind of argumentation from old dudes is quite common. The don't do this instead just play. The thing is that he used all that shopping as a long journey discovering what he liked and didn't like. What inspired him and what didn't. What kind of gear help him speak with his voice and what didn't.

    A long journey at the end of which he could say something like: Hey I only need my tele and my vibrolux and I'm good.


    The vid is not 100% BS, but has a quite large amount of it imho

  6. #5

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    All 30 of my guitars sound like me when I play them, so I stopped buying over ten years ago.

    So I don't need any more guitars.

    Except for the L50/ES-150 project, and the ES-175...oh and the L7, and the Sebring L5 copy and the ES335 I always wanted (the guy had a PRS, so I picked that up too but won't count that) and the sunburst Les Paul I saw on sale in 2013 and the Ibanez Mikro I got for my daughter....

    So, other than that, absolutely no guitar buying at all over a decade!! I'm proud of myself.

  7. #6

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    I do think he makes sense. But he did what he did to get him where he is, which is that he doesn't need to buy more guitars. Had he not went through this journey, he wouldn't be here.

    I do know a few good players who didn't really focus on his instrument but did on the playing. One of them played a Gibson 330 in high school. Decades later he still gigs with a 330.

    One of the best rock players I've known personally and played with stuck with the SG Junior. Another one had a Flying V. They didn't hardly notice other guitars except to be polite.

    You are right that old dudes talk this way. That's wisdom through experience. But there are also young musicians who seem to be immune to the sirens of other guitars.

    Not me. I was one who studied the models, always looking. I admit that much of it is the beauty of the instruments.
    MG

  8. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by Marty Grass View Post
    ...Not me. I was one who studied the models, always looking. I admit that much of it is the beauty of the instruments.
    I've always looked, always been interested in the stories, variety, trivia, but never been much of a buyer. At one point I had six guitars, down to four now (plus a bass). What I have now seems to be about the sweet spot practically. One flat top, one archtop, one semi, one solid. More is kind of a distraction.

    I could get by with fewer (honestly, just the semi), but it's nice to have a little variety, a spare for some gigs, and something for when people stop by to jam. OTOH, Les Paul prices do seem to be coming down ...

    John

  9. #8

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    There's a lot of sense here, yeah.

    I've basically figured out, to cover the sounds I use on a regular basis, I need 5 different guitars. So no altruistic "one guitar one amp" delusions for me
    Jeff Matz, Jazz Guitar:
    http://www.youtube.com/user/jeffreymatz

    "Jazz is like life...it goes on longer than you think, and as soon as you're like 'oh, I get it,' it ends."

    --The Ghost of Duke Ellington

  10. #9

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    I discovered about 1971 that the Telecaster and a good Fender amp (Super Reverb in my case) was all that was needed to do anything that I was likely to do and that's pretty much held true over the years. I owned a retail store '75-'84 and was able to own/try about everything there was. I'm pretty much still at that stage today although I've had different amps over the years and have gone to lighter weight ones (Evans and DV Mark) due to my advancing age and now build my Teles with chambered bodies for the same reason. I've played country, classic rock, jazz, country blues, and many theater productions of everything from "Evita" to "Always...Patsy Cline", to "Little Shop of Horrors", and it's always been the Tele. I guess I learned my lesson early and what others played never influenced me much (except Don Rich and James Burton.....LOL).

  11. #10

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    With dozens and dozens of pedals, he was (IMO) looking for something he didn't find, and the gits weren't helping. I hope he found something satisfying in tone and ultimately got some playable enjoyment that he could settle on like Jeff did.

    I know of art collectors, and even scotch collectors that get absolutely nothing from their collections other than the visual and "I have them" aspects.

    So with some 25 gits on my walls (and more in cases) I have visual enjoyment of "my" perception of art, and they serve a purpose / function that most collectors of other objects never have. I make no apologies for it and have no lessons learned other than what I or other players do is none their or my business.
    Regards,

    Gary

  12. #11

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    Most of my playing life i have owned one guitar at a time, usually a flat top acoustic, usually a Martin, of which I have owned around 15.

    Then back in 2003 I bought a Hiway 1 Telecaster, then an Epiphone Elitist Byrdland, an upper end Ibanez hollow body, several more Martins new and used, 5th Avenue, ... and so on totally around 15 guitars at one time. I had an epiphany (satori), enough is enough and gave several to my grandson who is an excellent guitarist, sold the Byrdland and a couple Martins downsizing to 5.

    Within the past year I decided that my Telecaster, two Martins, 1929 Stromberg Voisenet 12 fret, Carlos Pina Flamenco might be replaced with a single guitar so have spent the last month looking for that one guitar. I have visited local guitars stores, scoured the internet sellers, watched various videos, and have a very good friend who is a fine player and also a collector who has loaned me several guitars to road test. I currently have his 58 ES335 blonde, his 59 burst Les Paul to try out, also have tried his various hollow body Gibson dating from the 20s through the 60s. I liked them all.

    This has led me to believe that I cannot get along with one guitar but that the guitars that I have are enough, and if I were to get another, let's say a flat-top.. one of the Martins will go. The only possible exception may be a hollow body but as an acoustic with a possibility of a floating pickup.


    Thanks for posting the videos. Fortifies my own position ( current position). However, tomorrow is another day as we all know guitars are case by case...the right one may still be out there.
    Last edited by bohemian46; 05-18-2019 at 02:45 PM.

  13. #12

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    Since starting the guitar at age 10, I have always had at least 2 guitars (an electric and an acoustic) and mostly 3 or more. Always 1 amp, but often 2 or more of those. Guitars are functional art, and at one point I started collecting them (I had both the room to store them and the financial wherewithal to do so). At a peak, I was up to 22 guitars (and 8 amps). My bond with the guitars began to diminish and so I downsized. I am now at 13 guitars and 6 amps. I am well bonded with all that I have and gig regularly (4 nights a week on average), rotating all of my gear, so at the moment there is no need to downsize further. Up the road, I will retire from public performance and may well downsize further. I presume that my wife will survive me. I would rather not burden her with the task of finding new caretakers for a large number of instruments.

    But guitar collecting is not a one size fits all proposition. Some need a large collection to have different tools in their artistic pallet. Some enjoy the art of the guitar and if they can afford a large collection, why not? And some have an impulse control problem or a hoarding problem (if their GAS causes them to have financial harm, those problems need to be addressed.)

    To each their own.
    _____________________________________________
    "When the chord changes, you should change" Joe Pass

  14. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by GNAPPI View Post
    I know of art collectors, and even scotch collectors that get absolutely nothing from their collections other than the visual and "I have them" aspects.

    So with some 25 gits on my walls (and more in cases) I have visual enjoyment of "my" perception of art, and they serve a purpose / function that most collectors of other objects never have. I make no apologies for it and have no lessons learned other than what I or other players do is none their or my business.
    I've posted similar plenty of times.

    Another thing that always irks me in anti gas discussions is this kinda condescending notion of that gear keeps you away from practicing. This is a correlation that I don't necessarily believe exist and even if it does exit, I believe that for the majority of people more practice won't as a given lead to more happiness in their life.
    Last edited by Lobomov; 05-18-2019 at 12:49 PM.

  15. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by Lobomov View Post
    Another thing that always irks me in anti gas discussions is this kinda condescending notion of that gear keeps you away from practicing.
    Agree. Actually, in some cases more gear entices you to practice. And try new musical ideas you may not consider with only one instrument.

  16. #15

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    I have a jam buddy who says he has never sold a guitar or amp.

    Last I heard his current collection is 63 guitar wise, and about the same on amps.
    For example this guy recently bought a PRRI, and then the custom version, and then the special issue with the 12" speaker and burgundy tolex. He's currently on the hunt for a new flat top -- or maybe a new resonator.

    Don't get me wrong -- he's a great guy and a solid musician.
    Regarding his gear collecting, He likes to say "It's a disease".

    I've known him for a few years now and only seen him play 3 guitars ever.

  17. #16

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    As a public service, I have decided to open a guitar adoption agency for those afflicted with the tragic scourge of GAS. If you have guitars that are neglected, abused, or simply make you feel guilty, apply to "Strumcat's Home for Wayward Guitars" and I will do my best to find a place for them. Shipping is free!

  18. #17

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    Needs vs wants.... I think most guitarists only need three instruments: an electric, an acoustic and a classical. With those 3 you have all the bases covered. If your electric is a tele or 335 you can cover all forms of popular music and jazz. A Les Paul might work equally as well.

    Of course, as jazzers we tend to view arch tops as having the quintessential jazz tone but a recent Tim Lerch video comparing solid bodies and arch tops really undermined my certainties in that regard. It is hard to discern the difference between the guitars when amplified and skillfully played. See:




    As an aside, I played some gigs out west that covered everything from blues, rock, country and jazz. I asked the organizers to provide me with a Peavey Bandit and an American Standard tele for the gigs. Worked flawlessly and I could dial in the needed tones with little effort.

    Of course, I say all this but own 19 or 20 guitars myself. I really don't need them but it certainly is a bit of fun to play them all. Keeping them strung up and hydrated is a challenge though.

  19. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by Lobomov View Post
    A long journey at the end of which he could say something like: Hey I only need my tele and my vibrolux and I'm good.
    A long, expensive and wasteful journey; you could learn from 'old dudes', but I expect you won't.

  20. #19

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    If I'm having fun and can afford the outlay and space, who cares if I have a lot of gear? What I don't get is all the criticism from those that may not enjoy having stuff preferring simplicity and feeling this somehow makes them closer to the source. Or they may not be able to afford it and seem to resent those who can. Or both. Or maybe some just like being judgemental and look for a reason. Knock yourself out. If you like having less gear I think that's great. But if someone has the coin for a mid-30's L5 and wants one, by all means. Just be a good steward for a historical instrument. If they are a pro and invest in D'Angleico's (real ones), D'Aquisto's, and are on a first name basis with Monteleone, I enjoy hearing about the guitars and design insights. Love the custom guitar posts. And amps. And pedals.

    And I do have a lot of gear. Doesn't make me a better or worse musician. Or person. Just an aspect of the hobby I enjoy.
    Last edited by Spook410; 05-18-2019 at 07:26 PM.
    Hell is full of musical amateurs - George Bernard Shaw

  21. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by Litterick View Post
    A long, expensive and wasteful journey; you could learn from 'old dudes', but I expect you won't.

    Since I'm in my late 40s .. Probably not

  22. #21

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    Quote Originally Posted by Spook410 View Post
    If I'm having fun and can afford the outlay and space, who cares if I have a lot of gear? What I don't get is all the criticism from those that may not enjoy having stuff preferring simplicity and feeling this somehow makes them closer to the source. Or they may not be able to afford it and seem to resent those who can. Or both. Or maybe some just like being judgemental and look for a reason. Knock yourself out. If someone has the coin for a mid-30's L5, by all means. Just be a good steward for a historical instrument. If they are a pro and invest in D'Angleco's (real ones), D'Aquisto's, and are on a first name basis with Monteleone, I enjoy hearing about the guitars and design insights. Love the custom guitar posts. And amps. And pedals.


    I'll just keep on enjoying a roomful of gear and if you think liking gear makes me less of a musician, that's OK. I'll just be over here enjoying hours a day playing well made Chinese archtops, vintage Les Paul and Fender amps, and 5 figure brazilian flat tops all in the same afternoon. Working on gear, the variation in sounds, playability, and just hearing it.. that's part of the fun for me.
    If you have the money and it is enjoyable then why not spend the money on guitars? People with lots of cash spend on fashion, cottages, expensive meals, trips, girlfriends (and wives...maybe both) and on and on.... If you are wealthy enough I see buying a bunch of guitars as a relatively harmless hobby. At the same time, if you aim to work as a serious working musician you only need three or four. You can buy them used and with a decent couple of inexpensive amplifiers you can make fantastic music... if you are talented and creative.

    As I said earlier, I have 18, 19 or 20 guitars... (only my wife counts them). It's not rational but it's fun. That said, I am committed to thinning the herd. I can't reasonably manage that many guitars and managing them all does take way from playing time. So does dealing with all the software associated with modelling amps and effects.... It makes you crazy after awhile. It's a bit like social media... fun at the start but over time it just wastes your time...

  23. #22

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    Quote Originally Posted by Roberoo View Post



    I love Tim's playing .. but the fact that despite clearly demonstrating that a good tele is all you need .. He still has at least a handful of different teles and a nice collection of archtops both vintage and modern.

    That kinda hints at something, doesn't it?

  24. #23

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    I like the guy's videos. Like others said above, if you don't obsess too much, buying guitars is an inoffensive pastime.

    But, if you can't afford them, or don't have the time to keep a stable of guitars in good playing condition, I think the Five Watts guy has a good point: don't stress yourself and just play the gear you have. One or two guitars can be all you need. Unless you really are a session pro, you probably don't need to have that mythic "complete arsenal."

    Of course, the key word here is "need" -- like, I don't know, do I *need* to have all those books in my bookcase? Do I *need* to have three barbecue forks in my kitchen cabinet? And what on earth do I need four can openers for?

    And finally, this topic gives me an excuse to post this favorite video of mine: Segovia explains the "orchestral" guitar. There's a world of sound trapped inside those six strings. Cello! Brass! A whole miniature orchestra! Suddenly, the difference between an ES 335 and a Telecaster doesn't seem that important...


  25. #24

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    Looking at about two dozen guitars and half dozen amps here. For playing out I rely on a semi-acoustic, a flattop and a nylon as needed, and use venue amps if available. But I do like the idea mentioned above about guitars (and to some extent amps) as functional art, and have a thing for Japanese "bizarre" guitars, so still trawl the sale sites. Besides the visual value, many of these have their own interesting feels and tones that often inspire.
    Last edited by JazzPadd; 05-18-2019 at 09:39 PM. Reason: typo

  26. #25

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    I have the same attitude to guitars as I do to cars and women . I've got a useful , good quality model that I use everyday and that does everything I want . I sometimes pick up other models on a whim if they're not too expensive and look like they might be fun to play around with for a few months .

  27. #26

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    I'll get my coat .

  28. #27

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    Being concerned about having too much stuff seems like such a first world problem. Appreciate and be grateful for what you have and don’t covet your neighbor’s ass. Or Marie Kondo will come and take your fancy things away.

  29. #28

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    It is a first-world problem because we have all the stuff. People in the third world are paid very little to produce much of it.

  30. #29

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    I am a simple guy, and my guitar inventory is similar to my gun inventory, one per purpose. I have one rifle, one pistol, two shotguns, and one youth rifle that my sons all learned on, and so will my grandkids. I was the “serial monogamist” as the video described because I was always too broke to buy more. I have one nylon string, one archtop, one solid body, and one bass. I play the guitars all through one amp and use one reverb pedal for effects. Every guitar I play sounds like me, but they each serve a tonal purpose that is not really capable from the other guitars.

    on another interesting note, my “chibson” solid body appears to be authentic after all, but that’s going to have to be another thread.
    Last edited by zcostilla; 05-19-2019 at 09:37 AM.
    Redeemed, Husband, Father, Veteran. Thankful for all four!

    I play a customized Godin 5th Avenue, Córdoba GK Studio, Gibson L6-S and a Hamer Korina. I also play a Kala uBass on occasion

  31. #30
    Quote Originally Posted by Marty Grass View Post
    This is a very provocative video.

    Why?
    I am playing a solo over my buddys new song, King of Lego

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EKUeMfR0hgc

  32. #31

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    Quote Originally Posted by Litterick View Post
    It is a first-world problem because we have all the stuff. People in the third world are paid very little to produce much of it.
    Third world? That’s no way to talk about Kalamazoo!

    Would it be better not to pay workers anything to not produce stuff for us to buy?

  33. #32

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    It seems to me that the hoarding/collecting of many great instruments (especially by non pro players) keeps them out of the hands of players who could really benefit from them. Remember back in the day when the Japanese buyers were right inside the door at every guitar show buying up everything they could for collectors back home. I also remember hearing one time that George Gruhn was shipping Gibson mandolins to Germany as fast as he could get them. All this not only diminishes the supply, but keeps the price above where the average (even working) musician can afford them. In the violin world, owners of the great instruments put them out on loan to fine players but I doubt that will happen in the guitar world.

  34. #33

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    Quote Originally Posted by Skip Ellis View Post
    It seems to me that the hoarding/collecting of many great instruments (especially by non pro players) keeps them out of the hands of players who could really benefit from them. >>SNIP<<
    I get you Skip, it's not like we're talking trying to get one of some 500 Stradivari built violins left in the World here.

    But PUH... LEEZE, believe me there's absolutely NO shortage of GR8 instruments for pro players and those who "could" benefit from them.

    At any rate, the best players like many I've heard in here can play a cigar box git and sound better than most, if not well they just have to make do with all of the GR8 gits the hoarders don't gobble up :-)
    Regards,

    Gary

  35. #34

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    Quote Originally Posted by GNAPPI View Post
    I get you Skip, it's not like we're talking trying to get one of some 500 Stradivari built violins left in the World here.

    But PUH... LEEZE, believe me there's absolutely NO shortage of GR8 instruments for pro players and those who "could" benefit from them.

    At any rate, the best players like many I've heard in here can play a cigar box git and sound better than most, if not well they just have to make do with all of the GR8 gits the hoarders don't gobble up :-)
    Agreed, the vintage market will be largely left to collectors and the odd working musician with the cash. But...good musicians will have access to lots of good quality, lower priced instruments that they will make great music with.

  36. #35

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    Every time I worry about my purchases in The last 10 years:
    1 bass: $150 craigslist - my only bass I play for gigs (music man copy by sigma)
    2 guitars: 1 70s Japanese Yamaha sg and 1 60s Kay solid body- ($500 total) both were #1 for different periods- still in honeymoon with sg. Both craigslist

    i think about my drummer. 30+ sets and literally hundreds of snares and cymbals. He has the space, an accepting wife, the $$ and the thing that reduces the douch-baggery of such extravagance is he uses them and is a world class drummer. He uses different kits and cymbals and percussion stuff on a continually rotating basis. They are just different colors in his pallet.

    i think music instrument dealers, collectors, repair folk and, heck, even us musicians help support an industry. Yes there are crooks and frauds (and i’m Just talking the guitar players), but in my mind there are worse industries and livelihoods and hobbies than music.

  37. #36

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    I like his videos. My wife has been on simplifying tear lately thanks to Marie Kondo. I definitely have too many guitars. I define that as guitars I own but do not play. Same thing with pedals. I would like to cull the herd. Life was a lot easier when I had just a Tele, Deluxe Reverb and a Rat for good measure.

  38. #37

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    Quote Originally Posted by Lobomov View Post
    The thing is that he used all that shopping as a long journey discovering what he liked and didn't like. What inspired him and what didn't. What kind of gear help him speak with his voice and what didn't.

    A long journey at the end of which he could say something like: Hey I only need my tele and my vibrolux and I'm good.

    I think this is a PERFECT description, at least of me. At first I wanted more, then I got tired of having more than I played, then I realized the JOURNEY is fun- it's not a destination of "I want one of everything", it's a journey of "I had alot of fun TRYING one (or a few) of everything, and now I know where my heart lies, and what I REALLY connect with."

    I'm still on the "journey", I usually buy one/sell one, I'm trying to not ACCUMULATE (I currently have 7 guitars and 4 amps... but really only 5 guitars- 2 are kept from my youth, for sentimental reasons- and 2 amps -the other 2 are a cheap modeler for "quiet" play and a battery job for vacations)... I feel like I'm in the last "half" of my journey.

    There are maybe 2-3 more amps I want to check out, and 3-4 more guitars, then I'll whittle down to essentials. I can honestly say, I would ideally LOVE 2 electrics, 1 acoustic, and 2 amps.... we'll see if that happens LOL

  39. #38

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    Quote Originally Posted by Roberoo View Post
    Needs vs wants.... I think most guitarists only need three instruments: an electric, an acoustic and a classical. With those 3 you have all the bases covered. If your electric is a tele or 335 you can cover all forms of popular music and jazz. A Les Paul might work equally as well.

    Of course, as jazzers we tend to view arch tops as having the quintessential jazz tone but a recent Tim Lerch video comparing solid bodies and arch tops really undermined my certainties in that regard. It is hard to discern the difference between the guitars when amplified and skillfully played. See:




    As an aside, I played some gigs out west that covered everything from blues, rock, country and jazz. I asked the organizers to provide me with a Peavey Bandit and an American Standard tele for the gigs. Worked flawlessly and I could dial in the needed tones with little effort.

    Of course, I say all this but own 19 or 20 guitars myself. I really don't need them but it certainly is a bit of fun to play them all. Keeping them strung up and hydrated is a challenge though.
    Mind=BLOWN.

    We've had this discussion before here, but I think Tim's video shows the truth. Which I have long suspected. Even amongst my own guitars, I can get a "more hollow" sound out of my tele than I can out of my Gretsch Hot Rod.... interesting....

    I still want to try a Johnny A. And a 339. And an ES-Les Paul. And maybe a Wildkat. Not to mention a EXL-1 and Loar LH-309.

  40. #39

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    Quote Originally Posted by Pycroft View Post
    I have the same attitude to guitars as I do to cars and women . I've got a useful , good quality model that I use everyday and that does everything I want . I sometimes pick up other models on a whim if they're not too expensive and look like they might be fun to play around with for a few months .
    Not married, I assume?

  41. #40

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    Quote Originally Posted by ruger9 View Post
    Not married, I assume?
    Divorced
    "Somebody get me out of this chair." - BOB WILLS
    Hammertone is a registered Hofnerologist.

  42. #41

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    Enjoying the thread.

    Let a thousand flowers bloom.

  43. #42

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    Quote Originally Posted by consumerduck View Post
    the thing that reduces the douch-baggery of such extravagance is he uses them and is a world class drummer

    There is a quote in the gaming community that also rings true here
    "The better rig you can afford the last time you likely have to use it"


    It's not douche-baggery. I work my arse off in my 'lawyer/doctor' job. I have the $$ and why should I buy some beat up squier, when I can easily afford better. Since I don't have a lot of time to play the damn thing at least it makes me happy cause it's also a work of art.

  44. #43

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    I like this video a lot. All of the guitars sound fine, which tells me it's the player.

    The idea of a tone quest seems somewhat uni-dimensional. The experience of playing is much more than just the tone coming out of the speaker. It's the feel of the strings, the neck and the body. It's the look of the wood. It's what you as a player hear, the acoustic blended with the amplified. And it's the memories evoked by the whole experience, included all that you put into what got you to where you are.

    Robben Ford said give an instrument six months before deciding whether to keep it. It doesn't take six months to dial it in. But it does take that long to dial you in to it.

    I can't help but love the feel of an archtop. It's like home. Fortunately I also spent a ton of time with semi-hollows. They also feel natural.
    MG

  45. #44

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    Quote Originally Posted by Marty Grass View Post
    I like this video a lot. All of the guitars sound fine, which tells me it's the player.

    The idea of a tone quest seems somewhat uni-dimensional. The experience of playing is much more than just the tone coming out of the speaker. It's the feel of the strings, the neck and the body. It's the look of the wood. It's what you as a player hear, the acoustic blended with the amplified. And it's the memories evoked by the whole experience, included all that you put into what got you to where you are.

    Robben Ford said give an instrument six months before deciding whether to keep it. It doesn't take six months to dial it in. But it does take that long to dial you in to it.

    I can't help but love the feel of an archtop. It's like home. Fortunately I also spent a ton of time with semi-hollows. They also feel natural.
    IMO, best post of the whole thread thus far.

    Nothing wrong with a "tone quest", but I would say (to your point), when we say we are "looking for a certain tone", it also encompasses everything you mention. I simply call it "looking for KEEPERS"... guitars that I would actually regret not having if I sold them. So far, I have not regretted selling any guitar. And, looking at the 6 I currently own, besides my long-time #1, there's only 1 that I think I would truly miss were I to sell it. And that's interesting, because I've had it about 3 years, and just a few months ago I had decided I would NOT regret selling it (to fund another purchase), but somehow, in these last few months, I have changed my mind and moved it into the KEEPER category.

    Sometimes an instrument isn't just a great instrument- it's a recipe where everything clicks, and the whole is greater than the sum of it's parts. Those are the keepers, imo. I could buy or build another guitar just like them, but they wouldn't BE THEM.

  46. #45
    I envy people that can do all they want with music with just one guitar. I 've always mainly enjoyed the notes, hunting the things you actually play on the fretboard. Don't even usually turn on an amp at home, even with electrics. I also enjoy not having many things to weight me down. BUT THEN, at some point you get a tele, you get a strat, you get a les paul.. You start to experience the different things each one can do, so when the right guitar comes along, why not get it? If you buy smart/used it's like free leasing many times anyway, they hold their value. Archtops, acoustics, nylon.. they add up. One can reach 20 guitars VERY easily, without any duplicates.

    With amps it has been the same. Different voices, lots of fun. But at least with amps, since i use most of them for gigging only, it has been easy to cull the herd. One criteria, weight. Most of the heavier ones are gone.. but i do miss them!

    Sometimes i go away for two days and might only take a steinberger with me, no amp. Its ok, you still can play the music, practice, have a tiny amp or headphones. But then, when an archtop or a 335 or a les paul come back... what a luxury!!

    For me, as long as you play and enjoy them, no number of guitars or gear in general is too much. Most importantly, it is a financially viable endeavor. If it is important to you, it is relatively easy to break even, trade, buy smart, you can build up a collection without losing money.

  47. #46

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    My gear accumulation ("collection" is the wrong word here) is the result of years of seeking the best solution to gigging situations - getting the job done. Another key factor was opportunism - when a great deal presents itself, who am I to question? In the beginning I was thrilled just to have a working guitar and amp. That emotion was soon supplanted with a more orchestral approach - seeking the perfect voicing for musical ideas, making sure that the equipment involved produced the appropriate tones (at the requisite volumes) and was fit for purpose. Having the right tool for the specific specific job became paramount. I'm now surrounded by a couple dozen guitars and 15 amps, most of which have seen stage and/or studio time. Plus, I'm having a blast!
    Best regards, k

  48. #47

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    Quote Originally Posted by citizenk74 View Post
    My gear accumulation ("collection" is the wrong word here) is the result of years of seeking the best solution to gigging situations - getting the job done. Another key factor was opportunism - when a great deal presents itself, who am I to question? In the beginning I was thrilled just to have a working guitar and amp. That emotion was soon supplanted with a more orchestral approach - seeking the perfect voicing for musical ideas, making sure that the equipment involved produced the appropriate tones (at the requisite volumes) and was fit for purpose. Having the right tool for the specific specific job became paramount. I'm now surrounded by a couple dozen guitars and 15 amps, most of which have seen stage and/or studio time. Plus, I'm having a blast!
    Ha! You nailed my gear situation perfectly.

    All I can say to this is...Me Too!! (Not #me too)

  49. #48

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    I probably could do 90% of my gigs with just my Telecaster truthfully.

    But I love the dull/thunk of a good laminated archtop, particularly with big bobbin single coils like P90s or Dynasonics.

    I also love the acoustic presence and complexity of tone that a carved top guitar w/floating pickup has, and in a big band setting that's really the best sounding option other than playing acoustically using a lapel mic (not practical/possible for me, as the big bang jumps from 30's Basie to 70's Maynard Ferguson... and I don't like bringing multiple instruments if I can avoid it).

  50. #49

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    I can do all of my gigs with a Tele or Strat.

    I prefer the feel/sound of an archtop for bop.

  51. #50

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    Due to this thread, I sat here yesterday going back and forth between my solid body tele (standard tele single coils), my thinline Cabronita with TV Jones T-90s, and my Gretsch Hot Rod with Filtertrons and a tone switch (the Hot Rod isn't 100% hollow; it has trestle bracing, which most people think puts it closer to an ES-335 style guitar).

    Long story short, by using the volume and tone controls on each guitar, I was able to get all of them into the same ballpark- perhaps even the same neighborhood. Very much like Tim Lerch's video in this thread. And this was withOUT touching the amp's settings.

    I did have a preference for the Gretsch and the Cabronita over the standard tele for these tones, but it was very close. And the Cabronita and Grestch were slightly different- the Grestch definitely had a slightly airy thunk the Cabronita did not. I may even have preferred the T-90s to the Filtertrons, even tho the Grestch is a laminated archtop.

    It was a very interesting experiment, that now has me gassing alot less for a "jazzy hollow archtop" (like a Johnny A, Wildkat, or ES-Les Paul, 335), because my guitars are quite adept at getting those tones, with a little tweaking.

    However, it has NOT cured my gas for a true hollow archtop for old-school tones, like an ES-125 type or Johnny Smith type. THAT is still on the radar. And I think I'll put some single coils in the Grestch someday... I have never married to the Filtertrons. Either TV Jones T-Armonds (his version of the Dearmond/Dynasonic) or perhaps real dogear P90s... we will see....

    All that being said... sometimes we can get over-focused on tone (there is more than one "good tone"), and lose the forest for the trees. Maybe someone just WANTS a Gibson Johnny Smith, or a goldtop VOS Gibson Memphis ES-Les Paul, or a custom shop Gibson Johnny A, or whatever... because they do. Some guitars are works of art in addition to being great players. Maybe their hero played one. While I know I don't NEED a Johnny A to get the tones I sometimes look for, if I had the cash to afford a custom shop Johnny A in a cool color, I'd buy one