Reply to Thread
Posts 1 to 42 of 42
  1. #1

    User Info Menu

    I stumbled upon this album of Kenny Burrell's and right away noticed the Charlie Christian pickup on an L5 yes? How cool is that?! It seems every time I hear KB play I think to myself, "now THAT is the ultimate jazz guitar tone"! However, it's obviously in his hands because there are recordings of him playing ES-175s, Super 400s, now I see this L5 with CC pickup.

    What other guitars has he been known to play and record with? I know in recent years he's had his Heritage guitars but back in the day was it generally always the 175 and/or Super 400? Any others? By the way the times I have seen him live in California over the last 18 or so years, seems he always had a Super 400.

    Kenny Burrell's Guitars-1200x630bf-jpg
    Doug Martin
    www.dougmartinguitar.com

    "Live life and play music like it's your last day on earth. One day you'll be right" - Russel Malone

  2.  

    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #2

    User Info Menu

    In the late 60’s thru at least some of the 70’s he played a DANGELICO New Yorker. His comment was he like the size 18”. Makes sense he used a Gibson Super 400 much of the time. In the hierarchy of Jazz Guitar Kenny is the Pope of those still alive. We deacons understand who speaks with absolute authority!
    specializing in repair and setup, does your guitar play like it should?

  4. #3

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by deacon Mark View Post
    In the late 60’s thru at least some of the 70’s he played a DANGELICO New Yorker. His comment was he like the size 18”. Makes sense he used a Gibson Super 400 much of the time. In the hierarchy of Jazz Guitar Kenny is the Pope of those still alive. We deacons understand who speaks with absolute authority!
    And amen to that Deacon Mark! I am glad he is still with us!
    Doug Martin
    www.dougmartinguitar.com

    "Live life and play music like it's your last day on earth. One day you'll be right" - Russel Malone

  5. #4

    User Info Menu

    A couple more I can think of, that blonde florentine custom L-5 w Christian pu and finger tp.





    Also a non cut Epiphone Emperor






    Oh, and a flattop and a couple classicals.
    Last edited by wintermoon; 04-17-2019 at 12:04 AM.

  6. #5

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by Gitpicker View Post
    And amen to that Deacon Mark! I am glad he is still with us!
    I second that emotion!

    I'm also glad that Kenny Burrell is still with us.

    His Guitar Forms album that I bought around 1970 remains one of my favorite to this day!.

    Regards,
    Steven Herron
    Kenny Burrell Tabs - Guitar Solos, Tab Books, Instruction DVDs + Video Lessons

  7. #6

    User Info Menu

    Kenny also had and recorded with an L-7
    _____________________________________________
    "When the chord changes, you should change" Joe Pass

  8. #7

    User Info Menu

    And IIRC, Kenny's L-7 had a CC pickup.....
    _____________________________________________
    "When the chord changes, you should change" Joe Pass

  9. #8

    User Info Menu

    Wolf Marshall did an excellent article/interview with Kenny Burrell a few years ago in: "Vintage Guitar Magazine".
    The article covers his guitars/gear and offers details about his career. It is well worth reading for those of us who feel Kenny gets the best tone!

    Kenny Burrell | Vintage Guitar(R) magazine


  10. #9

    User Info Menu


  11. #10

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by wintermoon View Post
    A couple more I can think of, that blonde florentine custom L-5 w Christian pu and finger tp.





    Also a non cut Epiphone Emperor






    Oh, and a flattop and a couple classicals.
    Oh yeah! I have seen the photo with the Epiphany, totally forgot! Thank you!
    Doug Martin
    www.dougmartinguitar.com

    "Live life and play music like it's your last day on earth. One day you'll be right" - Russel Malone

  12. #11

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by helios View Post
    Wolf Marshall did an excellent article/interview with Kenny Burrell a few years ago in: "Vintage Guitar Magazine".
    The article covers his guitars/gear and offers details about his career. It is well worth reading for those of us who feel Kenny gets the best tone!

    Kenny Burrell | Vintage Guitar(R) magazine

    Fantastic! I will check this out! Thank you!
    Doug Martin
    www.dougmartinguitar.com

    "Live life and play music like it's your last day on earth. One day you'll be right" - Russel Malone

  13. #12

    User Info Menu

    Oooooohhhh! Awesome! Thank you Dirk!
    Doug Martin
    www.dougmartinguitar.com

    "Live life and play music like it's your last day on earth. One day you'll be right" - Russel Malone

  14. #13

    User Info Menu

    Kenny Burrell's Guitars-kenny-burrell-joue-moon-sand-flv-jpeg
    -- Isn't it crazy that "archtop" and "luthier" are spelling errors on this forum?

  15. #14

    User Info Menu

    I know this has been discussed before. What guitar and amp did KB use on Midnight Blue? Is that known for certain? Thanks.

  16. #15

    User Info Menu

    In the Vintage Guitar magazine article mentioned above in post #8 Kenny Burrell stated:

    "Gibson made me an L-5 with a deep cutaway in the late '50s. They did it reluctantly. I played that guitar for a while, but it was too heavy. It had a much bigger block; they thought the body wouldn't hold the neck with the deep cutaway otherwise."


    I'm confused. Was that late '50s L-5 a Gibson custom model with a deep Venetian cutaway?
    Deep Venetian cutaways were one characteristic of German archtops, all modeled after the Roger 'Super Special', the Glassl 'Solist' and the Lang 'Prämus' and 'Mastro Arturo'. Never seen something similar on American archtops.
    If you, for instance, study a Glassl you'll notice that the neck blocks of these guitars (at least, of the earlier ones) were a special construction, the sides around the cutaway area bent in three dimensions ...


    If not, i.e., if that Gibson L-5 was the predecessor of the '60s regular L-5 with (deep) Florentine cutaway:
    Why did Kenny complain about the weight of that L-5, when the 18" Super-400s that he later used were even more heavyweight? Even the simple changing or downsizing of the L-5's neck block by Gibson would certainly not bring the weight down enough.

  17. #16

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by Ol' Fret View Post
    In the Vintage Guitar magazine article mentioned above in post #8 Kenny Burrell stated: "Gibson made me an L-5 with a deep cutaway in the late '50s. They did it reluctantly. I played that guitar for a while, but it was too heavy. It had a much bigger block; they thought the body wouldn't hold the neck with the deep cutaway otherwise."
    I'm confused. Was that late '50s L-5 a Gibson custom model with a deep Venetian cutaway?
    Deep Venetian cutaways were one characteristic of German archtops, all modeled after the Roger 'Super Special', the Glassl 'Solist' and the Lang 'Prämus' and 'Mastro Arturo'. Never seen something similar on American archtops.
    If you, for instance, study a Glassl you'll notice that the neck blocks of these guitars (at least, of the earlier ones) were a special construction, the sides around the cutaway area bent in three dimensions ...
    If not, i.e., if that Gibson L-5 was the predecessor of the '60s regular L-5 with (deep) Florentine cutaway:
    Why did Kenny complain about the weight of that L-5, when the 18" Super-400s that he later used were even more heavyweight? Even the simple changing or downsizing of the L-5's neck block by Gibson would certainly not bring the weight down enough.
    Doc: That late '50s 21-fret L-5CES Gibson custom model had a deep Florentine cutaway and is shown in the b/w photo. Compare that to the later production Florentine cutaway in the 20-fret L-5CES. Burrell refers to a "much bigger block" - that might have been the case, or perhaps he just perceived it as such compared to the L-5CES models of the day.
    Attached Images Attached Images Kenny Burrell's Guitars-gib-l-5-custom-kb-jpg Kenny Burrell's Guitars-gib-l-5ces-f-1-jpg Kenny Burrell's Guitars-gib-l-5ces-f-2-jpg 
    Last edited by Hammertone; 04-18-2019 at 09:32 PM.
    "Somebody get me out of this chair." - BOB WILLS
    Hammertone is a registered Hofnerologist.

  18. #17

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by D'Aquisto Fan View Post
    I know this has been discussed before. What guitar and amp did KB use on Midnight Blue? Is that known for certain? Thanks.
    Early 60s custom Gibson L-5 w Christian pu through Rudy Van Gelder's Fender tweed deluxe

  19. #18

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by Hammertone View Post
    Doc: That late '50s 21-fret L-5CES Gibson custom model had a deep Florentine cutaway and is shown in the b/w photo. Compare that to the later production Florentine cutaway in the 20-fret L-5CES. Burrell refers to a "much bigger block" - that might have been the case, or perhaps he just perceived it as such compared to the L-5CES models of the day.

    Thanks for your explanation, Stephen!
    I didn't know that Kenny Burrell was somehow involved in the development of what is generally considered by most players as 'minor design issues'. To my knowledge the first 17" wide Gibson Electric to be converted from a Venetian to a Florentine cutaway was the Birdland.

    A.R. Duchossoir: "At the end of the 50s, the top-end model in the thinline series was the best-selling carved top Electric with annual shipments in excess of those combined for the Super 400CES and L-5CES. After it was equipped with humbucking pickups, and following the introduction of the ES-335, Gibson tentatively designed a double cutaway Byrdland for the July 1958 NAMM Show. The prototypes made never evolved into production models but CMI and Gibson were still keen to 'modernize' the Byrdland.
    This was achieved in the second half of 1960 via a restyled body shape featuring a Florentine cutaway, characterised by a flatter inside curve than on smaller-sized models such as the ES-175. [...]
    The accompanying caption read 'Now made with a deeper Florentine cutaway body for easier, more comfortable playing in the upper register'. [...]
    A small box at the bottom of the Byrdland feature simultaneously announced that the deep Florentine cutaway was also available on other 17-inch electrics, namely the ES-350TD, the Super-400CES, the L-5CES and the ES-5 Switchmaster. [...]
    The advent of a Florentine cutaway signalled minor cosmetic and structural changes such as a shorter pickguard or a longer neck block."


    What is confusing to me is that Kenny complained about the weight of the "much bigger block" of a Florentine L-5CES, just to prefer the larger (i.e., heavier!) Florentine Super-400CES. So I doubt that Kenny knew what was exactly going on at the Gibson guitar R & D - similar to what happened to Barney Kessel and Tal Farlow a bit later.


    The OP might not be interested, but he may allow one short excursion in terms of cutaways and the trials to a better access to the upper register on hollow-body archtops.
    The Germans tried to achieve this through a deep Venetian cutaway (Roger Super Special 1946/47).
    Here a comparable early Hopf 319S by Gustav Glassl:

    Kenny Burrell's Guitars-dscf4259a-dscf4261a-jpg

    Because Glassl at this time was still using the (classical style) conical neck foot, he distorted the sides in three dimensions at the cutaway-neck-block area:

    Kenny Burrell's Guitars-dscf4262a-dscf4263a-arrows-jpg

    That does not only look funny or weird, but leads to the phenomenon that - when watching the guitar from the side - the cutaway-neck transition gives the impression that the upper body and neck block area may look a bit in the sky, or that there must something be wrong with the neck block. So if someone is afraid of a possible body distortion or neck block issue on such a Glassl, chill out - it's simply the way it was designed to be! Later on in his career, Glassl turned to the more appropriate parallel neck heel design.



    I never studied the neck blocks on a Florentine L-5CES or Super-400CES, but the more on some early '60s Barney Kessels:

    Kenny Burrell's Guitars-dscf4265a-dscf4269a-jpg

    Kenny Burrell's Guitars-dscf4268a-dscf4270a-jpg

    Well, that construction doesn't exactly look like a thoughtful joint nor a master woodworking job, and it's only logical that Gibson changed that soon on the later BKs (hopefully to the better!) that sported a different neck-body junction.



    Another essential point is almost wantonly neglected when it comes to significantly better access to the upper fretboard - without the use of a huge Venetian or Florentine cutaway. It's about the length or reaching of your left hand thumb.
    Artur Lang got this right in his first production year; I'm still waiting for other makers to arrive there.
    Here a comparison of the neck foot radius on my '96 L-5WM vs. an almost 60 years old Lang. You'll feel the difference immediately:

    Kenny Burrell's Guitars-dscf4271a-dscf4272a-arrows-jpg

  20. #19

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by wintermoon View Post
    Early 60s custom Gibson L-5 w Christian pu through Rudy Van Gelder's Fender tweed deluxe
    Thanks, Wintermoon. So is the L5 from Midnight Blue the one pictured in post #16? I wonder if Van Gelder's tweed deluxe was a narrow panel vs. a wide panel? I assume narrow panel.

    Oh, and what are some Kenny Burrell recordings where he is playing his D'Angelico? Do we have info on the D'A? Was it made for him? What year, etc.?

    Thanks!

  21. #20

    User Info Menu

    It's the one in post #1 on the Weaver of Dreams lp.
    The NYer was made for Al Chernet in '56, Kenny got it in the 60s
    It was originally blonde but Kenny had it refinished sunburst.
    It's on a lot of recordings, one I can think of is his tribute to Charlie Christian. The deluxe was a narrow panel.

  22. #21

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by wintermoon View Post
    It's the one in post #1 on the Weaver of Dreams lp.
    The NYer was made for Al Chernet in '56, Kenny got it in the 60s
    It was originally blonde but Kenny had it refinished sunburst.
    It's on a lot of recordings, one I can think of is his tribute to Charlie Christian. The deluxe was a narrow panel.
    Thanks for the reply, Wintermoon! Is there more info on the Midnight Blue L5? What year is it? Was it an L5C fitted with a CC pickup? An L5 CES with a CC instead of P90s, Alnicos or PAFs? Does Kenny still have it today? Thanks!

  23. #22

    User Info Menu

    '61 L-5C custom w CC.
    I doubt he still has it.

  24. #23

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by helios View Post
    Wolf Marshall did an excellent article/interview with Kenny Burrell a few years ago in: "Vintage Guitar Magazine".
    The article covers his guitars/gear and offers details about his career. It is well worth reading for those of us who feel Kenny gets the best tone!

    Kenny Burrell | Vintage Guitar(R) magazine

    What a great interview. He is a national treasure.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro

  25. #24

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by wintermoon View Post
    '61 L-5C custom w CC.
    I doubt he still has it.
    Thanks for all the information. I really appreciate it!

  26. #25

    User Info Menu

    As much as I love KB, I was raised (in my jazz personna) on his early records, Minight Blue, Blue Bash, and a CTI release I can't think of right now, his more recent records don't have that classic KB tone. Ah well, that's life.
    With so much available to everyone, thank goodness we can still have and enjoy the previous offerings of ....everyone!

  27. #26

    User Info Menu

    Kenny Burrell is great.
    The weaver of dreams track to me is the epitome of the Smokey jazz club tune. It combines all the tricks, complication and content I look for in a truly great performance. Combined with the absolutely perfect sound of a Jazz guitar played by a master. If that song doesn’t get you some booty, nothing ever will.
    Joe D

  28. #27

    User Info Menu

    Here is a video of Kenny playing his DA (with Dearmond PUP). Barney is playing his Gibson ES-350 (With CC PUP) Grant is playing his Epi Emperor (with McCarty PUP). IMO all three sound great:
    _____________________________________________
    "When the chord changes, you should change" Joe Pass

  29. #28

    User Info Menu

    Nice Stringswinger!

    Yep, all sound great and tone is in the hands more than anything else. But don't tell me that, I need to keep believing I need to buy more guitars. As I said before, seems almost every recording I hear of him no matter what he's playing I think to myself, now THAT is THE ultimate jazz guitar tone! Later in Kenny's case I guess he decided, "once you go Super 400 you never go back"

    Gimme a Super 400 I'll bet you I won't sound like him I'll sure enjoy trying though!
    Doug Martin
    www.dougmartinguitar.com

    "Live life and play music like it's your last day on earth. One day you'll be right" - Russel Malone

  30. #29

    User Info Menu

    How about some Kenny Burrell Super 400 tone:




  31. #30

    User Info Menu

    That's IT! Sounds so damn good! Does it get any better?? Seriously!
    Doug Martin
    www.dougmartinguitar.com

    "Live life and play music like it's your last day on earth. One day you'll be right" - Russel Malone

  32. #31

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by Gitpicker View Post
    That's IT! Sounds so damn good! Does it get any better?? Seriously!
    It does not get any better, just different.

    When I first heard Kenny Burrell, I liked him. His muscular tone and liberal use of blue notes spoke to me. I think the first album of his that I bought was "Kenny Burrell and John Coltrane"

    In my younger days, I thought other players who played more notes were the "better" players. With age (maturity?) I have come to realize that Kenny always played the "right" notes and never any more than was necessary.

    I own a Super 400 because of him (though I will never sound like him....and that is OK, I would rather sound like me). I have seen Kenny live many, many times (I am glad I did as I think his public performance days are over).

    I believe that a thousand years from now (assuming we humans do not go extinct through sheer stupidity) Jazz will survive and a handful of jazz guitarists will be remembered. Kenny Burrell will surely be among them. And when most of the Asian made archtops of today have long been relegated to the dustbin of history, the Gibson Super 400 will still be cherished and venerated. As it should be.
    _____________________________________________
    "When the chord changes, you should change" Joe Pass

  33. #32

    User Info Menu

    I am sad I never saw him and now will likely never. Would love to just meet him. Seems so thoughtful, kind and interesting.

  34. #33

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by Stringswinger View Post
    It does not get any better, just different.

    When I first heard Kenny Burrell, I liked him. His muscular tone and liberal use of blue notes spoke to me. I think the first album of his that I bought was "Kenny Burrell and John Coltrane"

    In my younger days, I thought other players who played more notes were the "better" players. With age (maturity?) I have come to realize that Kenny always played the "right" notes and never any more than was necessary.

    I own a Super 400 because of him (though I will never sound like him....and that is OK, I would rather sound like me). I have seen Kenny live many, many times (I am glad I did as I think his public performance days are over).

    So cool Marc. I got Best of Kenny Burrell when I was 15. I only saw him twice. Once in 2000 (I think) and he was just killing it. Totally in command and kicking ass. When I saw him again 5 or 6 years later he was great but already a bit "tired in the hands" for lack of a better term and I say that with all the love I can muster. It was a great show but not close to the energy of the first one.

    I wish I had seen him more but am grateful for the couple times I saw him. Both concerts were at Yoshis Oakland.
    Doug Martin
    www.dougmartinguitar.com

    "Live life and play music like it's your last day on earth. One day you'll be right" - Russel Malone

  35. #34

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by Stringswinger View Post

    In my younger days, I thought other players who played more notes were the "better" players. With age (maturity?) I have come to realize that Kenny always played the "right" notes and never any more than was necessary.
    I'm 100% with you on this, but for me it was Grant Green.
    On the Turntable: Wes Montgomery - Back on Indiana Avenue, Paul Motion Trio - It Should've Happened a Long Time Ago
    Guitar:
    Fender AVRI '59 w/ TI Swing 11s and Tyson Tone pickups
    Through: Polytone Mini Brute II

  36. #35

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by Stringswinger View Post
    It does not get any better, just different.

    When I first heard Kenny Burrell, I liked him. His muscular tone and liberal use of blue notes spoke to me. I think the first album of his that I bought was "Kenny Burrell and John Coltrane"

    In my younger days, I thought other players who played more notes were the "better" players. With age (maturity?) I have come to realize that Kenny always played the "right" notes and never any more than was necessary.

    I own a Super 400 because of him (though I will never sound like him....and that is OK, I would rather sound like me). I have seen Kenny live many, many times (I am glad I did as I think his public performance days are over).

    I believe that a thousand years from now (assuming we humans do not go extinct through sheer stupidity) Jazz will survive and a handful of jazz guitarists will be remembered. Kenny Burrell will surely be among them. And when most of the Asian made archtops of today have long been relegated to the dustbin of history, the Gibson Super 400 will still be cherished and venerated. As it should be.

    This was mt exact experience as a young player.
    I remember my teacher asking me what guitar players I liked. I think I said Wes, Martino, Pass, Kessel, etc.
    He asked what about Kenny and,I said I liked him, but the others a bit more.
    Like SS, it took a few yrs for me to truly appreciate Kenny's style, it doesn't have to be a million note solo to say something and say it beautifully

  37. #36

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by Gitpicker View Post
    So cool Marc. I got Best of Kenny Burrell when I was 15. I only saw him twice. Once in 2000 (I think) and he was just killing it. Totally in command and kicking ass. When I saw him again 5 or 6 years later he was great but already a bit "tired in the hands" for lack of a better term and I say that with all the love I can muster. It was a great show but not close to the energy of the first one.

    I wish I had seen him more but am grateful for the couple times I saw him. Both concerts were at Yoshis Oakland.
    I used to love going to Yoshi's! I lived in Oakland in the 80's when Yoshi's was at the original location in Berkeley!

  38. #37

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by wintermoon View Post
    This was mt exact experience as a young player.
    I remember my teacher asking me what guitar players I liked. I think I said Wes, Martino, Pass, Kessel, etc.
    He asked what about Kenny and,I said I liked him, but the others a bit more.
    Like SS, it took a few yrs for me to truly appreciate Kenny's style, it doesn't have to be a million note solo to say something and say it beautifully
    I like players who can do both. When I 1st heard Randy Rhoads I heard meaningful melody encased in 100's of 64th notes. Then Eddie Van Halen blew me away even further. But I always loved the feel that Carlos Santana had.
    Basically it left me with an opinion that for me, a great player can do it all. I look for complexity in things my hero's play. A triplet is easy. But when a player talks to you by stringing 4 of them together to tell a story, that is special. Kenny can do that. He is a virtuoso. He can do it all. And the sound his big ass hands can coax out of any guitar? Priceless.

    But Dougie, you have that special gift too. It is so nice to see one of the up and coming stars of the Jazz Guitar world be honest and open about their hero's. Some day in the future, young guitarists will saying the same things about you Doug.

    Joe D

  39. #38

    User Info Menu

    To me the key thing is that these great players are able to say what they want to say on the guitar without any technical obstacles stopping them. The fast/slow part has to do with what they want to say. If Kenny Burrell wanted to say something musically that requires a Jimmy Raney style 16 measure stretch of 8th notes at a high tempo, he could do it. The guitar is not an obstacle to the masters. They have reached a point where their technique is transparent to their musical ideas.
    - Lawson
    "Whenever you come near the human race, there's layers and layers of nonsense." - Thornton Wilder, Our Town

  40. #39

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by lawson-stone View Post
    To me the key thing is that these great players are able to say what they want to say on the guitar without any technical obstacles stopping them. The fast/slow part has to do with what they want to say. If Kenny Burrell wanted to say something musically that requires a Jimmy Raney style 16 measure stretch of 8th notes at a high tempo, he could do it. The guitar is not an obstacle to the masters. They have reached a point where their technique is transparent to their musical ideas.
    I fully agree. Too many guitarists can play really fast but have little to say. I prefer Kenny Burrell's recordings from the mid 60s. The 'Tender Gender' album from that period is still my favourite jazz guitar vinyl album (Chess records). I don't know what guitar he is using.

    Speaking about favourite things, here is a recording from that same Chess period, which shows he always has something to say, whether playing slow or fast.


  41. #40

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by stevus View Post
    I fully agree. Too many guitarists can play really fast but have little to say. I prefer Kenny Burrell's recordings from the mid 60s. The 'Tender Gender' album from that period is still my favourite jazz guitar vinyl album (Chess records). I don't know what guitar he is using.

    Speaking about favourite things, here is a recording from that same Chess period, which shows he always has something to say, whether playing slow or fast.



    Oh my the sound and playing of Kenny Burrell on the Tender Gender! I never get tired of listening to it going to do this right now.
    specializing in repair and setup, does your guitar play like it should?

  42. #41

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by deacon Mark View Post
    Oh my the sound and playing of Kenny Burrell on the Tender Gender! I never get tired of listening to it going to do this right now.
    The Tender Gender is a Great recording . I do believe that Kenny was playing his DA at that time....
    _____________________________________________
    "When the chord changes, you should change" Joe Pass

  43. #42

    User Info Menu

    By chance has anyone seen the interview with Kenny (maybe it was a CBS or PBS news bit) where he’s playing in a small club with a Super 400 and a Zoller floating pickup? I’d come across it on youTube awhile back but can’t seem to find it anymore....