1. #1

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    Hi Folks,

    I recently acquired a D'Aspiranta laminated archtop with floating JS style PU and rosewood bridge. (All original pieces).

    I was shocked to find that the guitar was much louder acoustically than I expected from a LAM, but also extremely bright (too bright) from the playing position. Placing a mic in front and using headphones I was able to find a more moderate tone but still crispy.

    The pickup however is slightly overwound and is very dark so it mellows the tone amplified, almost too much so.

    I had an extra TOM hanging around so I swapped it out and it actually mellowed the tone considerably ( I also lost some volume). I'm thinking that in attenuating the volume overall, the high frequencies suffer more because they have less energy and the lows tend to remain. But the current thinking is that TOMs brighten so I don't know what to think.

    I would like to put a wood bridge back on there, the original RW was very thin and almost knife edge in the saddles. Maybe a thicker bridge or ebony might be the answer? I have TI flatwounds on there.

    Thanks for any advice given.

    Jeff

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  3. #2

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    Like most, I tend to prefer wood bridges on acoustic instruments, so that is how I would set up your guitar.

    I remember playing a D'Aspiranta New Yorker when they were for sale at Sam Ashe and being rather impressed with the tone and playability.

  4. #3

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    Ebony tends to be brighter than rosewood.

  5. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by davang55 View Post
    Hi Folks,

    I recently acquired a D'Aspiranta laminated archtop with floating JS style PU and rosewood bridge. (All original pieces).

    I was shocked to find that the guitar was much louder acoustically than I expected from a LAM, but also extremely bright (too bright) from the playing position. Placing a mic in front and using headphones I was able to find a more moderate tone but still crispy.

    The pickup however is slightly overwound and is very dark so it mellows the tone amplified, almost too much so.

    I had an extra TOM hanging around so I swapped it out and it actually mellowed the tone considerably ( I also lost some volume). I'm thinking that in attenuating the volume overall, the high frequencies suffer more because they have less energy and the lows tend to remain. But the current thinking is that TOMs brighten so I don't know what to think.

    I would like to put a wood bridge back on there, the original RW was very thin and almost knife edge in the saddles. Maybe a thicker bridge or ebony might be the answer? I have TI flatwounds on there.

    Thanks for any advice given.

    Jeff
    Not sure what you are getting at but you do not want the break over on the saddle where the strings pass to be wide. It should almost be a point with just a enough of a notch to hold the string in place. You can simple replace the whole bridge and saddle with another ebony one and see how that does. Not all the costly and easy to do.
    specializing in repair and setup, does your guitar play like it should?

  6. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by davang55 View Post
    Hi Folks,

    I recently acquired a D'Aspiranta laminated archtop with floating JS style PU and rosewood bridge. (All original pieces).

    I was shocked to find that the guitar was much louder acoustically than I expected from a LAM, but also extremely bright (too bright) from the playing position. Placing a mic in front and using headphones I was able to find a more moderate tone but still crispy.
    I'm pretty sure the D'Aspirantas have a solid pressed top, not a laminate. bicbw
    -- Isn't it crazy that "archtop" and "luthier" are spelling errors on this forum?

  7. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by deacon Mark View Post
    Not sure what you are getting at but you do not want the break over on the saddle where the strings pass to be wide. It should almost be a point with just a enough of a notch to hold the string in place. You can simple replace the whole bridge and saddle with another ebony one and see how that does. Not all the costly and easy to do.

    That's exactly what I was getting at. Thanks for the tip.

  8. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by Woody Sound View Post
    I'm pretty sure the D'Aspirantas have a solid pressed top, not a laminate. bicbw
    I have an Aspiranta New York, too. As everything mentioned above, it is a very loud guitar which articulates everything extremely well. In fact, without exaggeration, it is the loudest archtop I have come across --- but, then again, I have not played Strombergs, or similar big band guitars of that era, to admit!

    By the way, I am pretty sure it is a solid top (pressed, not carved, I imagine); there is a great deal of correspondance about these guitars on the net - as they were designed by a great enthusiast, and they were the first of the Peerless New Yorkers. The factory made these for a while to order (by the famous L.A. doctor who designed and based them on D'aquisto New York, then, because of the successful results, they continued to make them under their own Peerless brand - selling them rather expensively nowadays. I have compared them with my D'Aspiranta, and I am sure they are not at all anything like the quality of these early ones.

    BTW - The original pu is perfectly adequate, but with my new Kent Armstrong replacement it sounds fantastic (Johnny Smith style, again, but with my specific requirements which Aaron Armstrong helped with) - I also added a tone control.
    Best wishes,
    S.