The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
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  1. #26

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    WHY WAS THE GIBSON ES-775 SO SHORT-LIVED?
    Liberace did not play guitar

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    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #27

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    Quote Originally Posted by Liam1289
    I have the same model but can't find a Gibson sticker inside. I was wondering if yours has one? I cant find an answer as to whether or not the 775 has the gibson sticker inside.
    My ES-775 does not have a Gibson label inside. Of all the ES-775 pictures I’ve seen online I’d say it’s about 50%/50%, with and without labels.

    Welcome to the forum!

    Jon

  4. #28

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    Quote Originally Posted by icr
    Liberace did not play guitar


  5. #29

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    Looking at the left hand, I'm not sure that photo is proof of playing.

  6. #30

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    Quote Originally Posted by sgosnell
    Looking at the left hand, I'm not sure that photo is proof of playing.
    Liberace is quite the jazz cat, he's playing an Em11. Or possibly A11sus2/E. Wait, it could be a G69/E...

  7. #31

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    He knew more than one chord

  8. #32

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  9. #33

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    I ordered an ES775 when they first came out, I had the guitar for only 6 months; it was very heavy, the wood piece on the tail fell off after a month and I had to glue it back, and the tone was not (in my opinion) as good as the ES175. They are beautiful to look at but if you hold one standing up, you'll know why it didn't last very long in production.




    Cheers,
    Arnie...

  10. #34

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    Here's one for sale on Reverb with the Gibson sticker inside.
    Gibson ES-775 Sunburst | Flat Five Music | Reverb

  11. #35

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    Quote Originally Posted by wintermoon
    The funny thing is elvis was a decent pianist. Not Liberace level but decent.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  12. #36

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    Quote Originally Posted by TH
    An instrument like that can support itself in the line over time, but Gibson is/was run by executive decisions of fast money and make a lot of it now. That probably means somebody with good ideas can manage to sell the idea, and if it doesn't sell a million yesterday, the business heads see it as a failure.
    Which is why there are 734 different official models of the Gibson Les Paul.

  13. #37

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    Quote Originally Posted by WilliamScott
    Here's one for sale on Reverb with the Gibson sticker inside.
    Gibson ES-775 Sunburst | Flat Five Music | Reverb
    That's sold now. At a grand less than the cheapest 175 on Reverb, I'm not surprised. Holy moly are 175's expensive now!

  14. #38

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    Quote Originally Posted by customxke
    I sort of assumed these were made to use up leftover headstock overlays and fretboards from other discontinued models.
    You may be right, because they were used on a few guitars in the 80's.

  15. #39

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    Quote Originally Posted by AKA
    I agree with all of the above except I don't find the 775 to be a nice looking guitar. I think the headstock inlay is uninspired - if not downright corny. What is that thing?.
    It's the famous "Flying F-Hole." Was also used on two of the Active Artist series. I'm probably one of the only people who like it.

  16. #40

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    Quote Originally Posted by Woody Sound
    It's the famous "Flying F-Hole." Was also used on two of the Active Artist series. I'm probably one of the only people who like it.
    I guess it’s really not so bad.

    AKA

  17. #41

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    I don't give a flying f...

  18. #42

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    Quote Originally Posted by Woody Sound
    It's the famous "Flying F-Hole." Was also used on two of the Active Artist series. I'm probably one of the only people who like it.

  19. #43

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    Reverb has an informative article about those unique "Artist" models that included the "Winged F" headstock inlay...as well as Tim Shaw designed Moog electronics.

    When Gibson Put Moog Preamps In Guitars: Les Paul | Reverb News

  20. #44

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gitfiddler
    Reverb has an informative article about those unique "Artist" models that included the "Winged F" headstock inlay...as well as Tim Shaw designed Moog electronics.

    When Gibson Put Moog Preamps In Guitars: Les Paul | Reverb News
    Boy, do I feel lucky! I have an ES-775, probably built on request in 1994, which makes the life-span 1990-1993 obviously a little longer. This is what the serial number indicates, according to Gibson, but the same serial number might also refer to 1997... And mine does have a sticker. But foremost, a beautiful guitar, plays exceptionally well, and the tone is sweet and soft, even non-amplified. I hardly ever play amplified (Fender Hot Rod George Benson).
    And, double luck, I also have an ES Artist, with the same Flying F, both acquired by accident, within three months of each other. My ES Artist is from the first series of 27, made in 1979. I still have the Moog, and it works, but I had her set-up with the continuously fine '57's, regular tone circuit, split-coil, phase and a jazz switch (extra condensator for dark sounds).
    Ain't that summin'?

  21. #45

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    Quote Originally Posted by SG2000
    Boy, do I feel lucky! I have an ES-775, probably built on request in 1994, which makes the life-span 1990-1993 obviously a little longer. This is what the serial number indicates, according to Gibson, but the same serial number might also refer to 1997... And mine does have a sticker. But foremost, a beautiful guitar, plays exceptionally well, and the tone is sweet and soft, even non-amplified. I hardly ever play amplified (Fender Hot Rod George Benson).
    And, double luck, I also have an ES Artist, with the same Flying F, both acquired by accident, within three months of each other. My ES Artist is from the first series of 27, made in 1979. I still have the Moog, and it works, but I had her set-up with the continuously fine '57's, regular tone circuit, split-coil, phase and a jazz switch (extra condensator for dark sounds).
    Ain't that summin'?