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  1. #51

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    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #52

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    Quote Originally Posted by golfus
    Anthony Wilson gets some great sounds out of that Les Paul Deluxe.

    My experience is that all maple topped Lesters sound similar. The Studios (slightly thinner maple top) are a bit on the dark side and the Deluxe (mini humbuckers) and Custom (70's on have a male top and have an ebony board) and the Artisan (same as the later Customs) are a bit on the bright side. It is the Hog topped Customs (as played by Pat Martino and Jim Hall) that have a different sound.

  4. #53

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    it's not the warmest tone, but sounds great, and works in the groups context well... i just got a LP style guitar and it doesn't make me want to play straight ahead at all, lol... but i love the clean tones so much... great for fusiony overdriven tones though

  5. #54

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    Quote Originally Posted by Donelson
    Here is a player that I had forgotten about, as far as having been a Les Paul player. Looks like a LP Deluxe in the pic on the back cover. Lorne Lofsky. I came across this record "It Could Happen To You" in a Boston used records store, like 1980-1981. Never heard of him. But I liked the picture with the Les Paul (front cover has an ES175, probably some stock photo) & the tune selection, also on a name label Pablo. So I bought it. Listened to and played along with that LP many times back then. Excellent jazz trio record.
    Attachment 61060Attachment 61061
    Wow. Lorne with hair.

  6. #55

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    Not really many examples of Lesters being used in what you'd call straight-ahead jazz. Benson did sound great, in spite of the flat string - gotta love Bigsbys (?)

  7. #56
    A longtime friend of mine told me recently that he had seen Lenny Breau play here in Nashville a couple of times, mid-70's, where Lenny was using a Les Paul. Here is a pic that confirms that. LP Custom, hard to tell the vintage from the blurry pic.

    Gibson Les Paul - What well-known jazz guitar players have used one?-dhyyppyxkaesure-jpg

  8. #57
    Quote Originally Posted by Peter C
    Not really many examples of Lesters being used in what you'd call straight-ahead jazz. Benson did sound great, in spite of the flat string - gotta love Bigsbys (?)
    Why is that? Main point of me making this thread. I am sitting here with the 2016 LP trad, set up perfectly, for a longtime playing jazz-leaning cat, me. To me, if you can't pick this axe up and sound like $1,000,000, there is a huge problem with your skills. LP Standard has a gigantic fatness unattainable with a jazz box due to howling feedback issues, yet it has a sound not all that different. No distortion needed ever. The fat sound is right there out of the box through any amp ever made.

  9. #58

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    Quote Originally Posted by Donelson
    Why is that? Main point of me making this thread. I am sitting here with the 2016 LP trad, set up perfectly, for a longtime playing jazz-leaning cat, me. To me, if you can't pick this axe up and sound like $1,000,000, there is a huge problem with your skills. LP Standard has a gigantic fatness unattainable with a jazz box due to howling feedback issues, yet it has a sound not all that different. No distortion needed ever. The fat sound is right there out of the box through any amp ever made.
    .......I agree with what you say about the sounds any LP will make....but as to why they never got used much by the old jazz guys ??....here's two answers -
    1. The old guys rarely needed the volume
    2. An LP is really uncomfortable for any player who's used to archtops, which means most old jazzers.........and worse if he's a tall old jazzer........

    If the old guys needed volume they turned to 335 style guitars...played standing they're fine, and at least players could play them when seated....but if you have to sit and play an LP, you fight over which knee is better, and you feel like each of your arms suddenly got a foot longer......

    ......the same answers apply to why there aren't more old jazzers playing Strats or Tele's, which early on were also much lighter than LP's..........

    .......just my .02 cents worth.......

  10. #59

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    Quote Originally Posted by golfus
    Well, Jazz comes in different shapes. Diana Krall is a fine Jazz musician, there's a double bass in the band and Tom Waits doesn't regularly wear a Stetson hat. But I wouldn't call that performance "Jazz". Some sort of troubadour blues, perhaps.
    -Does it matter what we call it? Maybe when trying to answer the OP:

    Quote Originally Posted by Donelson
    I can't think of any well-known non-fusion jazz guitarists, who are known to favor the LP Standard.
    My 2 cents:

    Because the LP-model is associated with an era that put an end to Jazz as pop music.

    Because since the '70s, everyone that ever owned a LP viewed it primarily as a blues/rock guitar. We have all explored the tones made famous by legendary LP players and tweaked setup and rig for the most glorious distorted tones. Once I get there, I'm likely to keep it in that shape, i.e light gauge strings, hot pickups, low action, various mods for increased brightness etc. Perhaps not the most favored setup for clean Jazz, even though Jazz can be played on any guitar. Also Jazzers like to sit down and play and it could take some time to adapt to the ergonomics of the LP.

    Most people think of an archtop as a "Jazz-guitar", but the musician may see it as a "guitar". I like to differentiate acoustic vs electric guitars. My logic is that any guitar with a magnetic pickup becomes an electric guitar when amplified.

    The guitar is a tool (with a certain look) made relevant by the player. Some guys like to capture the vibes from the golden days before the LP was born, some are post bop and some are modern avant-gardes'. Some just play.

    If Jazz is whatever I like it to be, then obviously I can use any guitar to play my "Jazz".

    Other than that, I would refer to George Benson, that used to play a LP Standard in his early days.

  11. #60
    Two week anniversary since I got this awesome 2016 Les Paul Traditional. Last night I did two small mods, reversible easily. #1, swapped out the tailpiece with my 2016 ES LP. ES LP had a stock featherweight aluminum tailpiece; LP trad had the stock regular heavy one. Done. I would not have bothered with that, except I mainly wanted to do #2, Put a brand new Gibson Nashville unslotted bridge on LP trad. Point, to make my own slots, so that the strings line up over the neck PU polepieces, & set the radius correctly. Done.

    How much weight reduction with the aluminum tailpiece? My first weigh was 9.56 lbs. Now LP trad weighs 9.41 lbs. That is 2-3 ounces I guess. Noticeable? A little bit. ES LP is still way under 7 lbs with the heavier tailpiece. Win/win IMO. Different sound? Some say that there is a different sound with the tailpiece material. To me, the difference is minuscule, if any. Zero listeners could detect any difference in a blindfold test, that is for sure.

    Gibson Les Paul - What well-known jazz guitar players have used one?-lp-trad-new-bridge-jpg

  12. #61

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    Joe Morris uses his Les Paul Custom for most of his career, below are a few performances that he has done!!

    Also, he's one of the reasons why I bought a Les Paul Custom!!!





  13. #62

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    Quote Originally Posted by mr quick
    our boy george is tearing it up on an LP in these jack mcduff clips





    with a bigsby too, for some reason
    Quote Originally Posted by Donelson
    That is great, I never knew that Benson used a LP standard. Thanks.
    Sorry to bump this old thread but I found it retrospectively when googling the topic. Relative newcomer to jazz listening over the past couple of years and started attempting to play it a few months ago. Really getting the bug and that has inevitably sparked some GAS for an arch top. That said, I love my Les Paul and its probably all I'll ever actually need. I only play for myself and with friends.

    The clip of GB playing a Les Paul is inspiring. I'd be very interested to know if he used one on albums like Giblet Gravy. Does anyone know?

    Not the finished (tone) article yet and I think I can get it a little more "hollow" and old jazz with some tweaking, but here's where I'm at with Les Paul jazz tone so far..

  14. #63

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    Years ago I had an Epi LP, and later a PRS single cut. Both were no fun playing seated. I have enough problems just playing. Don't need to fight the guitar too. They are so butt heavy they want to flip up.

  15. #64

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    Years ago, I had (first) a Les Paul sunburst with two P90s, and (second) a Les Paul Recording with two low impedance pickups.

    I loved the sound of each guitar and enjoyed the jazz tones I got from these two quite different Les Pauls.

    Ultimately, though, I didn't like the size of the guitars. The very small body size was comfortable when playing standing...but was a chore to play seated. I just don't like playing a guitar smaller than a 16" archtop when playing when sitting.

    Les Pauls are very nice guitars on a strap though.

  16. #65

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    Steve Erquiaga plays a Les Paul and sounds awesome.

  17. #66

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    Back in the 1950s Louis Primas guitarist as well as Bill Haleys guitarist used Lee Paul Customs when they were called fretless wonders,LOL!

    I think the Les Paul can be a good Jazz guitar,but not the best choice for several
    reasons.

    Weight, Size ergonomically, lack of acoustic properties. Sustain is definitely a plus but at the cost of the weight.
    Jazz players are generally accustomed to feeling some air move in both feel and tonally.

  18. #67

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    I took my Les Paul Recording out for a 3hr gig last night, the tone was great.
    However, my shoulder sure is on the sore side today.
    It's a very unique instrument, in my opinion a superb solid body jazz guitar, but there are certainly more comfortable instruments to play for longer gigs!

  19. #68

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    Quote Originally Posted by entresz
    I took my Les Paul Recording out for a 3hr gig last night, the tone was great.
    However, my shoulder sure is on the sore side today.
    It's a very unique instrument, in my opinion a superb solid body jazz guitar, but there are certainly more comfortable instruments to play for longer gigs!
    The Les Paul Recording is a bit more comfortable because of the larger body and the rear contour
    Jan Akkerman likes that size and has a custom Gibson with a Recording body but regular humbuckers
    I'd like a Les Paul Personal myself, but only two ever came into Australia

    The LP Recording we had in the shop around 1978 was an unusual one, it had this cool multicoloured prism tint on the headstock
    Anyone else seen that on a Gibson before?

    Gibson Les Paul - What well-known jazz guitar players have used one?-akkerman-jpg

  20. #69

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    Quote Originally Posted by matcarsa
    I can't think of any jazz guitatist that played regularly on a LP standard.
    I think both Al Dimeola and John McLaughlin played a LP.

  21. #70

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    Here's my "Les Paul" (a Slaman Pauletta) - check the "video" from 1:45 which is when the jazz player takes over:



    It has a full size CC pickup and some slightly different woods (and 1.75" nut width plus slimmer neck specs than stated in the original CR guitars' description - basically feels like an archtop neck), but it still has the DNA of a Les Paul.

    As you can see/hear, it sounds just great for jazz (and that video was played with 10's or 11's). I've had great results with it when playing with others. BUT I concur that my shoulder "feels it" after about an hour, and sometimes that lingers to the next day if I press on...which recently happened to me when I was called to sub for a long big band practice.

    While I've always been a neck pickup guy, running both pickups can work pretty well when comping...a luxury we don't get on archtops.
    Last edited by coolvinny; 10-23-2020 at 12:38 PM. Reason: changed link to youtube link from CR guitars

  22. #71

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    Quote Originally Posted by coolvinny
    a luxury we don't get on archtops.
    ??

  23. #72

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    My hunch on the "not many Les Pauls in jazz" deal is that a lot of players who are after the Gibson aesthetic are probably going "the full Gibson" and playing one of the many hollowbodies available, and those who want a more versatile or rugged instrument are thinking "shoot, my tele could fall off the stand at a gig and nothing would happen."

  24. #73

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    Quote Originally Posted by Marcel_A
    ??
    Most archtops only have a neck pickup. Most Les Pauls also have a bridge pickup which can be blended with the neck pickup for a different (brighter) tone.

  25. #74

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    I will mention however that I recently saw an excellent pro play an entire jazz gig on a Les Paul but, to be honest, I thought he sounded better on the semi-hollow Gibson which he used to play.

  26. #75

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    Quote Originally Posted by Humbuckr
    Sorry to bump this old thread but I found it retrospectively when googling the topic. Relative newcomer to jazz listening over the past couple of years and started attempting to play it a few months ago. Really getting the bug and that has inevitably sparked some GAS for an arch top. That said, I love my Les Paul and its probably all I'll ever actually need. I only play for myself and with friends.

    The clip of GB playing a Les Paul is inspiring. I'd be very interested to know if he used one on albums like Giblet Gravy. Does anyone know?

    Not the finished (tone) article yet and I think I can get it a little more "hollow" and old jazz with some tweaking, but here's where I'm at with Les Paul jazz tone so far..

  27. #76

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    Quote Originally Posted by coolvinny
    Most archtops only have a neck pickup. Most Les Pauls also have a bridge pickup which can be blended with the neck pickup for a different (brighter) tone.
    i understand, but most archtops i know have two pickups.

  28. #77
    Well, I quite enjoy this tone


  29. #78

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    Quote Originally Posted by coolvinny
    Here's my "Les Paul" (a Slaman Pauletta) - check the "video" from 1:45 which is when the jazz player takes over:

    It has a full size CC pickup and some slightly different woods (and 1.75" nut width plus slimmer neck specs than stated in the original CR guitars' description - basically feels like an archtop neck), but it still has the DNA of a Les Paul.
    As you can see/hear, it sounds just great for jazz (and that video was played with 10's or 11's). I've had great results with it when playing with others. BUT I concur that my shoulder "feels it" after about an hour, and sometimes that lingers to the next day if I press on...which recently happened to me when I was called to sub for a long big band practice.
    While I've always been a neck pickup guy, running both pickups can work pretty well when comping...a luxury we don't get on archtops.
    I put this together as an homage to Les and Mary. Starting with a chambered Hysterical reissue, it weighed in under 8 pounds:

  30. #79

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    Quote Originally Posted by GaloDeBarcelos
    Well, I quite enjoy this tone

    I have found the P90 Les Pauls (mine is a 2016) to have a wonderful jazz tone.

  31. #80

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    lee retenour plays one on several YouTube clips..one with mike stern and one with larry carlton..and several more

  32. #81

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    Quote Originally Posted by entresz
    I took my Les Paul Recording out for a 3hr gig last night, the tone was great.
    However, my shoulder sure is on the sore side today.
    It's a very unique instrument, in my opinion a superb solid body jazz guitar, but there are certainly more comfortable instruments to play for longer gigs!
    Quote Originally Posted by sasquatch
    The Les Paul Recording is a bit more comfortable because of the larger body and the rear contour
    Jan Akkerman likes that size and has a custom Gibson with a Recording body but regular humbuckers
    I'd like a Les Paul Personal myself, but only two ever came into Australia
    Gibson Les Paul - What well-known jazz guitar players have used one?-lp-personal-front-jpg

    According to my records I owned this LP Personal for a little less than three years. I liked the larger size compared to a regular LP, but it was easily the heaviest guitar I've ever owned and I hated the "fretless wonder" treatment. Lots of interesting tones available except for standard Gibson ones. I had no use for Les's mic input. Never gigged with it and never missed it after selling.

    I liked what Akkerman did to his.

    Danny W.

  33. #82

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    Quote Originally Posted by Danny W.
    Gibson Les Paul - What well-known jazz guitar players have used one?-lp-personal-front-jpg

    According to my records I owned this LP Personal for a little less than three years. I liked the larger size compared to a regular LP, but it was easily the heaviest guitar I've ever owned and I hated the "fretless wonder" treatment. Lots of interesting tones available except for standard Gibson ones. I had no use for Les's mic input. Never gigged with it and never missed it after selling.



    I liked what Akkerman did to his.

    Danny W.
    Hey Danny, nice pic! I bought one of those Kustom 100's myself this year. Pretty rare in Australia!

    I still kick myself that I didn't have the $3K to buy a Les Paul Personal a few years ago.
    It was one of the first few from December '69 and had a gold Bigsby.
    Oh well, we can't have everything heh

    Gibson Les Paul - What well-known jazz guitar players have used one?-personal2-jpg

  34. #83

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    Seeing those pics reminded of this clip of a LP Recording model. Sounds pretty damn good to me, in these hands, at least:


  35. #84

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    I think this fantastic guitar playing by Larry Carlton was on his Les Paul. I think Larry and his Les Paul are all over these early records by Michael Franks. Amazing band, tunes, production, and guitar tone! This is from Sleeping Gypsy.




    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  36. #85

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    Probably been seen a million times but any excuse to see Jan Akkerman with his modded LP is a good one. He had one of the guys from Hamer [maybe Joel] do the work on that guitar.

  37. #86

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    This is a good example of an LP played clean in a jazz context (Phil Lee on an LP Deluxe), albeit not on a straight ahead standard:


  38. #87

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    Quote Originally Posted by Peter C
    Seeing those pics reminded of this clip of a LP Recording model. Sounds pretty damn good to me, in these hands, at least:

    That's me!

    It's a lovely sounding instrument. The low impedance pickups have an interesting sound. More like a warm sounding single coil than a humbucker.

  39. #88

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    Pete Banks was a long-time friend [he produced a band I was in back around 1979]. He was working on a solo project when Akkerman stopped by and contributed to some tracks. Lots of Les Paul stuff.

  40. #89

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    here's master ulf wakenius playing a cheap les paul copy and sounding better than most guys don on an archtop. He told me he paid less than $100 for it.


  41. #90

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    Quote Originally Posted by myhandhurts



    Pete Banks was a long-time friend [he produced a band I was in back around 1979]. He was working on a solo project when Akkerman stopped by and contributed to some tracks. Lots of Les Paul stuff.
    long time fave...banks and akkerman really burn

    cheers

  42. #91

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    When I posted that link I had second thoughts about the "jazz" aspects of Pete's album. It's jazz-ish but not really top-drawer jazz. He was also concerned that he sounded a lot like Akkerman and people couldn't discern between the two. He played the black LP Custom for those sessions and then bought my sunburst Custom.

  43. #92

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    Akkerman was my biggest personal influence as a teen.... but he didn't play a lot of jazz, and especially not on Hocus Pocus, which he used to mess around with a lot live.

    Cool entresz, good playing and nice suit!

    Fun fact: Pete Banks put together a band called Flash, then left for some reason. They auditioned and I turned up - must have been all of 17 years old - and was so nervous that I played the solo to a simple Dm chord progression in Em!! Didn't sound too good IIRC.

  44. #93

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    Quote Originally Posted by myhandhurts
    When I posted that link I had second thoughts about the "jazz" aspects of Pete's album. It's jazz-ish but not really top-drawer jazz. He was also concerned that he sounded a lot like Akkerman and people couldn't discern between the two. He played the black LP Custom for those sessions and then bought my sunburst Custom.
    i'd put it in a similar category as the santana & mclaughlin recordings...players familiar with some jazz vocabulary, but playing hard and distorted rock sounding guitars..very early 70's...i.e. a great time for fusion




    cheers
    Last edited by neatomic; 10-26-2020 at 05:56 PM. Reason: cl-

  45. #94

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    Quote Originally Posted by myhandhurts



    Pete Banks was a long-time friend [he produced a band I was in back around 1979]. He was working on a solo project when Akkerman stopped by and contributed to some tracks. Lots of Les Paul stuff.
    Banks himself is so underrated. This is a great album.

  46. #95

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    Quote Originally Posted by Peter C
    Akkerman was my biggest personal influence as a teen.... but he didn't play a lot of jazz, and especially not on Hocus Pocus, which he used to mess around with a lot live.

    Cool entresz, good playing and nice suit!

    Fun fact: Pete Banks put together a band called Flash, then left for some reason. They auditioned and I turned up - must have been all of 17 years old - and was so nervous that I played the solo to a simple Dm chord progression in Em!! Didn't sound too good IIRC.
    Banks and the rest of Flash broke up on a tour in New Mexico. The other 3 members kept trying to keep it afloat but to no avail. Later on there was a version of Flash with Ray Bennett [bassist] playing guitar. Banks formed Empire with his wife on vocals [soon to be ex-wife]. Pete told me that Akkerman didn't like their album [Two Sides] much.