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  1. #51

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    Quote Originally Posted by DanielleOM View Post
    When I hear the term digital amp, I always think they are referring to complete combo amp with DSP (Digital Signal Processing) chips in the design. (or other digital components) not necessarily anything specific to the power amp.
    Yes, "digital guitar amp" would normally mean a modeling amp. But Lawson-stone's post I was replying to was asking about digital power amps.

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  3. #52

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    I’m staying away from the class discussion since I am lacking in that area. Regarding the current $1500 price tag, if you consider that plenty of their solid state amps sell for over $1000, $1500 for their new tube amp seems quite reasonable. $1900? Time will tell.

  4. #53

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    There is a good summary of Class D on the Mambo amps website written by Jon Shaw. It is not digital.

  5. #54

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    From the email I just got from Henriksen:

    Over the past 13 years, Henriksen Amplifiers has built our reputation on designing and manufacturing high quality, high fidelity amplifiers for jazz and acoustic guitars using a premium solid-state architecture. We have become the industry standard for straight ahead jazz guitar amplification when it comes to that plug-n-play, high headroom solid-state sound, but there's always been something missing for customers who like a tube amp sound with a little break up or a more modern distortion-based guitar tone.

    Until now.

    Introducing The Forte! This design combines our JazzAmp with a full plate voltage 12AX7 based tube preamp, and has all the tube feel and warmth, combined with the rich tone Henriksen is known for, but without the weight and maintenance of a full tube amp. At only 28 pounds, The Forte has the clean headroom capable of delivering Fender Twin levels of volume, but is linear in design so you can get that same sweet sound at lower volumes as well.

    In addition to great tone, like all Henriksen products this amp was engineered to be a true road warrior and designed with the gigging professional in mind. Whether you're looking for a plug-n-play, high headroom amp for big clean sounds, or a low maintenance pedal platform that has some great analog feel to it, The Forte is exceptionally portable with the tonal versatility and volume to cover any gig and be just fine living in the trunk of your car.

    Of note was the claim to be able to deliver “Fender Twin levels of volume, but is linear in design so you can get that same sweet sound at lower volumes as well.”

    Could this be the portable Twin people have wanted for decades?

  6. #55

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    Update from Henriksen:

    SOLD OUT! We thought that would take a few months, not two weeks. Please check with your local Henriksen dealer to make sure they have The Forte on order, if so they should have them in the next few weeks. Otherwise the next production run will be available to ship in early April.

    Thanks for making the new Forte such an astounding success! The Forte's promotional pricing has now ended, and we are working on the next round of production.

    Contact your local dealer to inquire about stock and previously placed orders!

    Congrats to those who got the promotional price of $1500 as it will now cost $1900! I’m looking forward to a review and demo out here as soon as someone gets theirs.

  7. #56

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    Has anyone tried it yet? I'm intrigued.

  8. #57

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    It's actually the opposite of musicman amps, which had solid state preamps and tube power amps
    i should have kept my 1X10 RD50
    I still can't believe that 20 million people in this country have a home studio, but when they make a new amp that you want to check out, all you get are a bunch of crap iphone videos... c'mon man!!! an sm57 is less than a hundred bucks
    I'd love to check one out, but for $1900, I would rather have a vintage princeton, and a polytone

  9. #58

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    Quote Originally Posted by darby View Post
    Has anyone tried it yet? I'm intrigued.
    Bump for this -- anyone purchase/play one recently?

  10. #59

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    Also bumping...can anybody report back with intel?

  11. #60

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    Here's a demo by Tim Lerch:


  12. #61

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    Sounds like Henriksen is going head to head with Quilter, to these ears.

    Great demo, Tim.

  13. #62

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    Quote Originally Posted by MikeTT View Post
    Here's a demo by Tim Lerch:
    Give Tim a battery-powered Pignose and a 3/4-size Hello Kitty guitar, and he'd still sound fantastic!

  14. #63

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    Quote Originally Posted by marcwhy View Post
    Give Tim a battery-powered Pignose and a 3/4-size Hello Kitty guitar, and he'd still sound fantastic!
    That would be his punk phase.
    Build bridges, not walls.

  15. #64

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    Ampeg fliptop was a closed back design. The flip dealt with the heat.

  16. #65

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    On his facebook page, Tim says ii changed the speaker because was a little muddy... I think it sounds like a Henriksen 312 with more compression..... Not Fender al all, no?

  17. #66

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    Quote Originally Posted by marcwhy View Post
    Bump for this -- anyone purchase/play one recently?
    bob ross on the modern jazz guitar forum has one and has posted many clips with it.

  18. #67

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    Quote Originally Posted by jazznero View Post
    On his facebook page, Tim says ii changed the speaker because was a little muddy... I think it sounds like a Henriksen 312 with more compression..... Not Fender al all, no?
    Sounds nothing like the SS henriksen. Sounds very much like a fender IMO...

  19. #68

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    Thanks for the answer. The modern jazz guitar forum is : Modern Jazz Guitar Public Group | Facebook


    Thanks

  20. #69

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    I like the Forte, I did change the speaker because I thought the Hemp cone that comes with it had a lot of low mids that sounded kind of cloudy that I couldn't dial out. Once I put a speaker in that I am used to (not better just familiar) I was a lot more comfortable with the sound. the EQ works great to get lots of different sounds, in the above clip someone had asked Peter H. about how the amp would sound with a tele doing a more Blues/Americana type sound so he asked me to make a video of that sound. Its a very good and plenty loud, very flexible amp. I'll be using it a lot this summer since I play lots of outdoor festivals this time of year and the extra volume will come in handy.
    all the best
    Tim

  21. #70

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    I agree with Jack--very Fender-like. Hence my comment about Quilter.

    Quilter amps are excellent solid -state amps that recreate the Fender combo amp sound faithfully.
    Last edited by Greentone; 05-27-2019 at 07:30 PM.

  22. #71

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    Quote Originally Posted by Greentone View Post
    I agree with Jack--very Fender-like. Hence my comment about Quilter.

    Quilter amps are excellent solid -state amps that recreate the Fender combo amp sound faithfully.
    The quilters do not sound like a fender. They have a reactive output section so they breathe like a tube amp but I've spent dozens of hours going back and forth between my od200 and a fender amp and really, they sound nothing alike. I do love the quilter and it's hard to beat its feature set and price/power/weight but nobody is going to think you're playing through a fender amp when you play the quilter. It sounds like a SS amp but sounds great. The Forte actually has a fender vibe to it.

  23. #72

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    It seems to me 28 lb's is still hefty for what's essentially an SS amp. It's pretty much the weight of a Princeton.

  24. #73

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tal_175 View Post
    It seems to me 28 lb's is still hefty for what's essentially an SS amp. It's pretty much the weight of a Princeton.
    but with 10x the power. You could never use the princeton for a loud gig.

  25. #74

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tal_175 View Post
    It seems to me 28 lb's is still hefty for what's essentially an SS amp. It's pretty much the weight of a Princeton.
    Sounds reasonable, but what is the cabinet material?

    I have a 1x12 *extension* cab that alone is 44 lbs. Nice EVM12L speaker, though. Hand cart time!
    Build bridges, not walls.

  26. #75

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    Yeah 28lbs is not a show stopper. Blu on the other hand is only 12 pounds with the same power rating. Though of course different cabinet and speaker sizes. I wonder how much the tube aspects of Forte contribute to it's weight. I'm guessing they designed it in a way that didn't require them to use heavy transformers.

  27. #76

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    Just checked JazzAmp Ten is 23lb's with 10inch speaker and similar cabinet size, so I guess 28 lbs for Forte is pretty good.
    But for those who don't need to get louder than Deluxe Reverb levels for gigs and rehearsals I'm not sure weight difference is enough to justify paying more for an imitation amp 28 lbs is already cart territory for anything more than a couple of blocks or even less.
    I totally see the appeal for those who really need the twin levels power though. It'll fit in the trunk of a small car at least.
    Last edited by Tal_175; 05-28-2019 at 02:20 PM.

  28. #77

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    It sounds good to my ear!

    Curious to see a schematic of the circuit to see how the preamp was designed. Is it a SS-preamp with a tube somewhere in the signal path or is it really a tube-preamp that delivers a signal to the class D poweramp? I am pretty sure the EQ-section is solid state driven. Mind you, I have nothing against a good designed SS-amp, but I really hope the tube has a real function (preferably the signal goes from the input directly into the first half of the 12ax7 (driver), then come the tone controls, and then the 2nd half of the tube as recovery) and is not just a gimmick to lure poor guitar players into a SS/class D amp - that can be produced very cheapily - and ask a premium price for it.....

    The amp is very pricey, so I am afraid they use a $6 tube to give it a tube/boutique flavor to ask premium dough.

    Sorry for being so skeptical, but if you see the low prices for comparable Quilter or DV Mark amps (that go for 1/4 - 1/2 the price), it has to be really really good...... and the clips sound good, but I am not sure if they sound $1400 better than a DV Mark Jazz.
    Jazz, Funk, Soul & Boogaloo: My group | Listen to Hip Jazz a Go Go! | Jazz, Soul, Blues: Eva La Voix

  29. #78

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    it's 4x louder than a mark jazz. The mark jazz didn't have enough headroom for a loud gig or rehearsal for me.


    Quote Originally Posted by Little Jay View Post
    It sounds good to my ear!

    Curious to see a schematic of the circuit to see how the preamp was designed. Is it a SS-preamp with a tube somewhere in the signal path or is it really a tube-preamp that delivers a signal to the class D poweramp? I am pretty sure the EQ-section is solid state driven. Mind you, I have nothing against a good designed SS-amp, but I really hope the tube has a real function (preferably the signal goes from the input directly into the first half of the 12ax7 (driver), then come the tone controls, and then the 2nd half of the tube as recovery) and is not just a gimmick to lure poor guitar players into a SS/class D amp - that can be produced very cheapily - and ask a premium price for it.....

    The amp is very pricey, so I am afraid they use a $6 tube to give it a tube/boutique flavor to ask premium dough.

    Sorry for being so skeptical, but if you see the low prices for comparable Quilter or DV Mark amps (that go for 1/4 - 1/2 the price), it has to be really really good...... and the clips sound good, but I am not sure if they sound $1400 better than a DV Mark Jazz.

  30. #79

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    Quote Originally Posted by jzucker View Post
    it's 4x louder than a mark jazz. The mark jazz didn't have enough headroom for a loud gig or rehearsal for me.
    I see your point. I should have added I have no experience with either of those amps I mentioned, so I can’t really judge. Just saying it’s expensive... but perhaps worth it if it can do what no other amp can!
    Jazz, Funk, Soul & Boogaloo: My group | Listen to Hip Jazz a Go Go! | Jazz, Soul, Blues: Eva La Voix

  31. #80

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    Quote Originally Posted by Little Jay View Post
    I see your point. I should have added I have no experience with either of those amps I mentioned, so I can’t really judge. Just saying it’s expensive... but perhaps worth it if it can do what no other amp can!
    i agree that it's pricey by the way but I think it's kind of in a league of it's own. The fuchs version of the same type of design is $3k +. The milkman product is in the same price range. (Milkman 300W Half and Half Steel Guitar Amplifier – Milkman Sound)

    I had one briefly but didn't feel it was implemented properly for an archtop. Even with the bass all the way off, the milkman had a very heavy bottom end.

  32. #81

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    200w is not four times louder than 50w.

  33. #82

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    Quote Originally Posted by jorgemg1984 View Post
    200w is not four times louder than 50w.
    True, and there is a definition of "twice as loud" based on physics ... but it doesn't matter! No one would ever say "I need to be three time as loud". It's "I need to hang with this caveman drummer".
    Build bridges, not walls.

  34. #83

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    Quote Originally Posted by jzucker View Post
    i agree that it's pricey by the way but I think it's kind of in a league of it's own. The fuchs version of the same type of design is $3k +. The milkman product is in the same price range. (Milkman 300W Half and Half Steel Guitar Amplifier – Milkman Sound)

    I had one briefly but didn't feel it was implemented properly for an archtop. Even with the bass all the way off, the milkman had a very heavy bottom end.
    That’s a shame because I really do like the looks of that Milkman! And 28 lbs for a 12” is in the right ballpark as well.

    I do find the Forte very interesting though, it does sound good in the clips. I hope the price will go down.
    Jazz, Funk, Soul & Boogaloo: My group | Listen to Hip Jazz a Go Go! | Jazz, Soul, Blues: Eva La Voix

  35. #84

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tal_175 View Post
    Yeah 28lbs is not a show stopper. Blu on the other hand is only 12 pounds with the same power rating. Though of course different cabinet and speaker sizes. I wonder how much the tube aspects of Forte contribute to it's weight. I'm guessing they designed it in a way that didn't require them to use heavy transformers.
    With a class D poweramp they can omit the output transformer. A 12ax7 needs to have 6.3v heater voltage and some extra amperage delivered from the power transformer, so that’s probably slightly beefier than your standard SS-amp PT, but not by much (if at all). The B+ voltage they put on the 12ax7 is also interesting. It can be as low as 50 volts for the tube to operate if I am right, but in Fender amps it rates from 130 (Deluxe Reverb) to as much as 260 (Twin Reverb). Lower voltages sound a bit more ‘brown’, higher voltages yield more clean sparkle.
    Jazz, Funk, Soul & Boogaloo: My group | Listen to Hip Jazz a Go Go! | Jazz, Soul, Blues: Eva La Voix

  36. #85

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    Quote Originally Posted by Little Jay View Post
    With a class D poweramp they can omit the output transformer. A 12ax7 needs to have 6.3v heater voltage and some extra amperage delivered from the power transformer, so that’s probably slightly beefier than your standard SS-amp PT, but not by much (if at all). The B+ voltage they put on the 12ax7 is also interesting. It can be as low as 50 volts for the tube to operate if I am right, but in Fender amps it rates from 130 (Deluxe Reverb) to as much as 260 (Twin Reverb). Lower voltages sound a bit more ‘brown’, higher voltages yield more clean sparkle.
    The technology has changed a lot...most if not all class D amps have no power transformer, they use a switch mode power supply. Tubes/ valves can be powered to high voltages by something called a charge pump...
    it's all different now, which makes amps lighter. Not saying this is what the Forte uses, but it might well do. Evans amps ( and probably many others, Jazzcat might have had one) pioneered high voltage tube pre-amps over 10 years ago, but they didn't sell enough. Maybe the market is more receptive now.

  37. #86

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    Quote Originally Posted by jzucker View Post
    i agree that it's pricey by the way but I think it's kind of in a league of it's own. The fuchs version of the same type of design is $3k +. The milkman product is in the same price range. (Milkman 300W Half and Half Steel Guitar Amplifier – Milkman Sound)

    I had one briefly but didn't feel it was implemented properly for an archtop. Even with the bass all the way off, the milkman had a very heavy bottom end.
    Actually, I would say thatMilkman's closest equivalent offering to the Forte is their "The Amp" 12" combo. It's their "The Amp" pedal (12AX7 preamp, Class D power, reverb and term) in a 12" combo format. Price is $1299.

    The combo: The Amp 12" Combo: Lightweight 50W Guitar Amplifier by Milkman Sound

    The pedal: The Amp: 50W Guitar Amplifier pedal by Milkman Sound
    Last edited by David B; 05-29-2019 at 06:11 AM.

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  38. #87

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    the thing that makes forte unique is that it does *NOT* use class D. The class D amps impart their own sonic characteristics. Henriksen initially tried a class D power amp (cheaper, lighter, etc) but wasn't satisfied with the results with the HV fender style tube preamp he uses so he eventually used a more conventional, analog SS power amp design.

  39. #88

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    Has there been any explanation why the cab is bigger than their other 1x12" combos?
    Build bridges, not walls.

  40. #89

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    I am going to conjecture that an open-back 12" architecture works best with the volume of a cabinet the size of a Deluxe or even an old tweed Tremolux Fender amp.

    Those amps really sound fine.

  41. #90

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    Quote Originally Posted by BigDaddyLoveHandles View Post
    Has there been any explanation why the cab is bigger than their other 1x12" combos?
    I haven't seen any. It's an open back cab so that may factor into it. I would agree that hemp cone speaker would not be my first choice. What speaker did Tim put in his?

  42. #91

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    Quote Originally Posted by BigDaddyLoveHandles View Post
    Has there been any explanation why the cab is bigger than their other 1x12" combos?
    Bigger circuit? Heat dissipation?

  43. #92

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    Quote Originally Posted by BigDaddyLoveHandles View Post
    Has there been any explanation why the cab is bigger than their other 1x12" combos?
    Bigger cab gets deeper bass response. Open back leads to more ambient, less focused projection. Which makes sense since it seems like they are going for blackface type sound.

  44. #93

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    You can handle airflow needed for a single 12ax7 tube in a pedal. Box size isn't too critical, there. In fact, the Forte has an open top for the tube on the control panel. It's good to have an open back for airflow, which the amp has.

    I think that the amp design uses other cabinet considerations. An open-back, single-12 design has a rich history of great sounds. It will sound wimpy, however, if the cabinet volume gets smaller than, say, a Fender Princeton Reverb. And, sound will improve as the cabinet gets to the volume of the old tweed Fender Tremolux amp. (That may be the best tone for a single-12, open-back amp.)

  45. #94

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    Regarding the cabinet size, it's a bit shorter but wider than the Alfresco open-back Henriksen which was designed by Sound Island. I think it's 2" shorter but around 4" wider. I am also curious as to why they went that route; perhaps the tube pre-amp required some additional width or perhaps it was by design.

  46. #95

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    The cabinet size is almost exactly the size of a Fender Tweed Deluxe. 20" x 16" x 10"

    Fender is 20" x 16.5" x 9.5"

  47. #96

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    Quote Originally Posted by Greentone View Post
    Tubes are as much heating devices as they are diodes and amplification devices. The typical vacuum tube converts 50% of the energy applied to it into electronic "work." (i.e., diode switching or amplification, depending upon the design) The other 50% is emitted as heat into the "room."

    Tube devices thus are open box designs.
    I had a Traynor Studio Mate tube amp back in the 70's that had a closed speaker compartment. So the presence of tubes doesn't necessarily preclude a closed back design for the speaker compartment.

  48. #97

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    kawa

  49. #98

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    Great vid, Kawa!
    Mike, like Tim (above) will always sound great regardless of the gear he's using.

  50. #99

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    Thank you, marcwhy.
    kawa

  51. #100

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    Quote Originally Posted by jzucker View Post
    I haven't seen any. It's an open back cab so that may factor into it. I would agree that hemp cone speaker would not be my first choice. What speaker did Tim put in his?
    Jack, I put a Delta Lite Neo in mine which is a speaker without a ton of lows and a sweet high end that I'm used to. especially with my archtops it tends to eliminate the low mid mush. I think Scott Lerner put in a Lead 80 and he said it helped a lot.
    Generally speaking speakers make a big impact on how an amp sounds and its easy to go down a rabbit hole so i try to stick with one of a few that i have found work for me.
    all the best
    Tim