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  1. #1

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    The amp finally arrived.

    I'd ordered from GC. $359. There was a delay of about a week from the promised ship date, but it arrived safe and sound in what looks like the manufacturer's packaging -- that is, brand new and factory sealed. I mention this because I saw a review by somebody who seems to have gotten a return or something.

    I recall reading something about fan noise, but I didn't hear a thing.

    My initial impression, playing alone in the practice room is that it is not a particularly loud amp, with a Roland 40x that I often use seeming significantly louder (that one has a bigger speaker, but probably similar wattage). When I cranked the Master to 3 o'clock, I didn't care for the sound on chords. It seemed distorted to me. But, when I cranked the output of my ME80 up to the max, the input stage of the Little Jazz didn't seem to mind and I got a louder, but still clean, sound. The amp bothered me less on lead lines, where I don't mind a little bit of distortion that much.

    I compared it to a vintage Ampeg Reverberocket, my favorite all time amp. Tubes, of course.

    This is an impossibly unfair comparison. The old Ampeg is fragile, weighs 2.5x as much, I'm accustomed to it, and it would easily cost 2 or 3 times as much, if you could find one.

    The Ampeg made things sound soft and creamy where the Little Jazz seemed glassy or icy, for want of a better descriptor. I wanted to soften the sound of the Little Jazz. I tried with EQ adjustments and different levels of reverb, to no avail. To my ear, it's a little stark or harsh, but that's a very subjective viewpoint and not necessarily something bad about the amp.

    I wasn't crazy about the reverb. I'm not worried about it, because I like the reverb in the Boss ME80 -- which I always use.

    So, so far, I love the size and weight (roughly a 10.5 inch cube and 15lbs) , but I'm not sure about the sound.

    I'll try in a rehearsal tomorrow and see how it does. I'm going to keep adding to this thread as I work through the evaluation.

    EDIT: The experiment described above was with the Little Jazz sitting on top of another amp. I didn't realize how much difference that could make, compared to flat on the floor.
    Last edited by rpjazzguitar; 12-20-2018 at 03:56 AM.

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  3. #2

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    I find the 'mid' control has a profound effect on the overall volume of the amp- more so than on any other amp I've used.

    When I gig with mine the volume is somewhere between 5 and 7 on the dial with no audible distortion - mids are usually between 6 and 8 on the dial.
    I use a Nocturne JR Barnyard Preamp with mine to give it more of a tube amp feel.
    Last edited by entresz; 12-20-2018 at 01:41 AM.

  4. #3

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    The tone controls have a profound effect on both tone and, to a lesser extent, volume, especially the mid control. I tend to run my mid at ~1, highs maybe 11 or 12, and bass between 9 and 12 depending on the room and the guitar. But I generally start with everything at 12, or flat, and volume at ~10 or 11. I rarely crank the volume above 12, and don't often get there. It's just too loud for me at home, and even out unless it's a very loud situation. I try to avoid those. If you're looking for a Fender type sound, you won't get it from this amp. It's far closer to a Polytone sound.

  5. #4

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    One other point - it's rear ported, and position makes a big difference. It needs a foot or so from a wall, so the bass reflects off the wall. And flat on the floor, it's not a great sounding amp. It needs to be tilted or elevated. My preference is on the floor, tilted back. I just put something under the front edge to raise it 2 or 3 inches, and that makes a noticeable difference in the sound. Putting it on a chair or something to raise it up brightens it considerably, actually more than I like, but it's subjective. Anything is better than flat on the floor, though. And moving it just a few inches nearer or further away from something solid, like a wall or something else large and solid, can change the sound a lot. Experimentation will give you the best sound for your ears.

  6. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by sgosnell View Post
    One other point - it's rear ported, and position makes a big difference. It needs a foot or so from a wall, so the bass reflects off the wall. And flat on the floor, it's not a great sounding amp. It needs to be tilted or elevated. My preference is on the floor, tilted back. I just put something under the front edge to raise it 2 or 3 inches, and that makes a noticeable difference in the sound. Putting it on a chair or something to raise it up brightens it considerably, actually more than I like, but it's subjective. Anything is better than flat on the floor, though. And moving it just a few inches nearer or further away from something solid, like a wall or something else large and solid, can change the sound a lot. Experimentation will give you the best sound for your ears.
    Thanks for pointing this out. I just tried it. Even tilting it slightly makes a noticeable difference.

    Thus far, though, I like it best flat on the floor. But, I'm trying to tame a bright instrument. Well, that's taste, but the fact is that it makes a difference.

  7. #6

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    Certainly the position you prefer is a matter of taste. I only meant to point out that it makes a difference in the sound. Different can be good or bad. In my somewhat limited experience, the Little Jazz is more sensitive to position than most other amps. And that can be good or bad, depending on one's point of view and hearing.

  8. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by sgosnell View Post
    Certainly the position you prefer is a matter of taste. I only meant to point out that it makes a difference in the sound. Different can be good or bad. In my somewhat limited experience, the Little Jazz is more sensitive to position than most other amps. And that can be good or bad, depending on one's point of view and hearing.
    Position really does make a huge difference with this amp. That's true with ported amps in general but I think it's especially true with the Little Jazz and the Bud/Blue where they're squeezing a large sound out of a small enclosure. I think it's actually good for everyone because it means you have more control over the sound regardless of your taste ... want it big, warm and wooly, put it near the wall. Want it brighter and more articulate, move it away. I've said it over and over, this amp gives me a huge amount of pleasure and however I have it set up, I seem to be able to find a sound that makes me happy.
    My CD "Bare Handed" is available as a download at Bandcamp.com
    http://jimsoloway.bandcamp.com/album/bare-handed

  9. #8
    Played a rehearsal today. Keys, drumset, bass, guitar. I used the Comins GCS-1. We worked on some quieter material for the most part. Bassist brought the acoustic today.

    Little Jazz flat on a carpeted floor. Bass and Mids around 12. Treble at 11. Reverb around 10. Master at 12.

    A/B'ed it with the vintage Reverberocket. ME80 in the signal path for both guitars, adding reverb. The Ampeg Dimension control was around 10. Tone about 10 as well (it only has a treble roll-off).

    Both amps sounded great and, to my surprise, they didn't sound all that different. I was sitting to the left of the amps, with the amps facing the same way as I was - meaning neither one was pointing at me. The port of the Little Jazz faced back towards me, but well to my right (that shouldn't matter much, since the port, I assume, emphasizes lower frequencies which are less directional.

    Big win for the Little Jazz. It sounded fully warm enough. It was certainly loud enough for the rehearsal. I don't know yet if it will keep up with a horn band. I'll find out next week.

  10. #9
    Here's a recording from this morning's session.

    This is the GCS-1, ME80 and Little Jazz.
    Attached Files Attached Files

  11. #10
    Played a loud rehearsal this evening. Amplified acoustic bass, grand piano (open with a two fisted player), two guitars, drums and vocals. Probably at a volume that would be appropriate for a good size restaurant or a busy bar. Really a little louder than it needed to be for the room tonight. I had it facing me from about 10 feet away (the semisolid Comins didn't feed back).

    The LJ was plenty loud enough and it sounded fine at the higher volume. I forgot about it and played. It sounded loud enough, big enough (not boxy) and maintained good tone.

    I ended up thinking that I'd be perfectly happy with it in most, if not all, of the situations I play in. Next month, I'll try it with a 19 piece big band, and I expect it to be fine.

    I have a return privilege until Jan 30, but I think this one is a keeper.
    Last edited by rpjazzguitar; 12-24-2018 at 05:07 AM.

  12. #11

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    The DV Little Jazz is a very good amp, re above comment they DO NOT sound close or anything like a Polytone, not a bad thing they just sound different. Not warm tho.

    fantastic price wise,



    The Mid control is the key to it, the reverb is crap, but overall light compact clean punchy cheap.

  13. #12

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    I had the Little Jazz in attendance of the Micro 50. Used in a band with three blowers. It did well.The good thing about a small speaker and a small-faced amp is that the sound spreads much wider than with bigger speakers/cabs. If you're only comping, putting the amp behind the band will enable everybody to hear it. Relative lack of bass is only a blessing, as you probably want to sound acoustic. If you play solos, too, keep the amp next to you and add a second speaker behind the band. The Little Jazz has a jack for an aux speaker.

    Sorry if the above sounds elementary or patronizing.

  14. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by Gitterbug View Post
    I had the Little Jazz in attendance of the Micro 50. Used in a band with three blowers. It did well.The good thing about a small speaker and a small-faced amp is that the sound spreads much wider than with bigger speakers/cabs. If you're only comping, putting the amp behind the band will enable everybody to hear it. Relative lack of bass is only a blessing, as you probably want to sound acoustic. If you play solos, too, keep the amp next to you and add a second speaker behind the band. The Little Jazz has a jack for an aux speaker.

    Sorry if the above sounds elementary or patronizing.
    The 19 piece band spreads out the horns nicely in the room and the rhythm section squeezes into what's left.

    Up to now, I have put a JC55 in front of the drummer who is near stage right. I'm generally extreme stage right, and way in front, facing the reeds. The amp has an open back and the drummer and bassist (who is behind the drummer playing a Phil Jones briefcase that fills the room) can hear me okay. I doubt that the trumpets can hear me on stage left, but they don't complain. I can hear myself and the amp is far enough away that I don't have to blast myself. Drums and keys are loud enough and close enough, and does anybody ever have trouble hearing horns well enough?

  15. #14
    Yesterday my octet (4 horns, rhythm section and an added vocalist) played a very big room. Maybe 250 people.

    I took the Little Jazz. We weren't trying to overpower the room and had talked about needed to control our volume.

    There was a wall of glass behind us. I set up the LB about 2 feet in front of it flat on the floor. The back line was drums on my extreme left, then the bassist and then me. Keys to my right. I put my amp between the bassist and drummer. I don't like being right next to my amp. I prefer to hear it more in the context of the group, volume-wise. I use an ME80 pedalboard, so, if I need to adjust something, I do it there, not at the amp, typically.

    I was able to get a good sound as loud as I wanted to play. I generally figure that I'm responsible for stage volume. So, if everything sounds balanced to me, that's all I can do. I don't want to guess about how much louder I need to blast the stage so an audience member in the last row can hear the guitar clearly. If that's an issue, there ought to be a PA. There wasn't, partly because we were expecting maybe a fifth the crowd.

    A friend in the audience said the guitar was audible but a little too quiet, but I think that was my choice, not the amp's capability.

    We've played some sizable rooms, but this was the first time I ever had trouble hearing the horns, especially the flutes (used for a few tunes). It might have been 100 feet to the back wall, over a crowd of people, so I think there wasn't much reflected sound.

    Anyway, I was perfectly satisfied with the Little Jazz. I don't think I'd have been any happier if I'd brought my usual JC55. For this type of music, I don't feel the guitar has to be as loud as the piano most of the time -- and the piano was quite loud and arguably a little busy. I feel like I have to stay out of the way. If I was trying to keep up with the piano's volume, I'm not certain the LJ would do it, but, in that case, I'd get it off the floor, turn up the output of the pedal board (the LJ doesn't seem to mind a hotter input signal) and see what happens.

    I have a return privilege with GC, but it's not going back. 15 lbs, $350 and can cover most situations I play in.

  16. #15

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    I think the gain level on the Little Jazz is set quite low so it takes hotter signals pretty well. I wish it was set a fraction higher so I didn't have to crank the master quite so much. Would be handy with hot pickups though.

  17. #16
    A couple of days ago I used the Little Jazz with a 19 piece big band playing high energy music. The room has brick walls, maybe 40 by 50 (not that big for a band of this size).

    I had the LJ cranked about 3/4 of the way up. I had the output volume of my pedalboard to about 2 o'clock. That boosts the signal to some degree but I don't know how much.

    I guess I could have gone even louder, but I didn't need to. The guitar was audible in the audience. Tone was fine, to the extent that I could hear it -- I have to wear earplugs with this band and even though I have the custom fitted Etymotics, the sound isn't all that great.

    My guess is that some players wouldn't be satisfied with the volume, but it was enough for what I was trying to do. I figure that the keys should be more obvious for this kind of music and the guitar is supportive of that. For soloing, I use a pedalboard patch that has more volume. My solos, so far, have not had to go over horn backgrounds - if I had to do that, I'd have been concerned that the LJ wasn't enough amp -- not sure, but concerned.

    Overall, another win for the LJ.

  18. #17

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    Hi,

    I have been wondering where people have been going to buy the latest model Little Jazz where the fan is not visible when looking at the back. Most of the sites I see show the 1st generation where the fan is visible when looking at the back.

  19. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by DanielleOM View Post
    Hi,

    I have been wondering where people have been going to buy the latest model Little Jazz where the fan is not visible when looking at the back. Most of the sites I see show the 1st generation where the fan is visible when looking at the back.
    I ordered mine from Guitar Center in December 2018 and took delivery in January. $359.

    It is the newer model. The fan is not visible. Just some vents. So far, I've never heard a fan. If I hadn't read these posts, I would not have even guessed it had a fan.

    I wonder if they bothered to update the pictures when the new version came out.
    Last edited by rpjazzguitar; 05-21-2019 at 02:50 PM.

  20. #19

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    I ordered mine online from a music shop (Andertons) here in the UK a few weeks ago. Their website still shows the fan in a circular grille mounted at the back, but mine doesn’t look like that. The fan is concealed behind 4 narrow vertical slots, I can just see it inside. I have not heard it run yet.

  21. #20

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    I got mine from Guitar Center. I doubt they have any first generation models left. If you do order one and you don't like it, just return it, get a full refund, and try again.

  22. #21
    i have the GH250 which is the 250w (150 into 8) version but with a 2nd overdrive channel. I don't like the overdrive but the clean channel is nice. Way too much bass though. When I play loud and with an open back cabinet i have the bass on zero. Too bad there's not a -3db pad. It's also got way too much high end.

    Overall, I like the tone of the quilter OD200 better but it's nice having reverb built into the head. It's more tube like but the treble control on the DV Mark is a little closer to a fender in terms of being able to turn on or off the "benson" brightness.

    I'm on the fence about whether to keep it. Used it at a couple rehearsals with a trio I'm playing with and had it up about 1/4 way which I'm guessing is around the 40w mark assuming the controls are linear so perhaps the 50w would work in its place...

  23. #22

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    The Little Jazz is a combo, not a head, although it can be used as a head if one wants.

  24. #23
    Quote Originally Posted by sgosnell View Post
    The Little Jazz is a combo, not a head, although it can be used as a head if one wants.
    Talking about this, same amp :

    DV Mark Little Jazz-12674156_800-jpg

  25. #24

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    That's not the amp the thread is about. The Little Jazz is a combo. AFAIK the amplifier sections are the same, but they won't sound the same because the speaker and cabinet will be different. I get no Fender sounds from the Little Jazz, which is why I kept it. The Quilter 101 heads do sound like a Fender, which is why I sold them.

  26. #25

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    Quote Originally Posted by jzucker View Post
    Talking about this, same amp :
    Have you tried one yet Jack ?

    Even tho this thread is called Little Jazz ....
    i still find comparisons with other amps/speakers/combos informative ....

  27. #26
    Quote Originally Posted by pingu View Post
    Have you tried one yet Jack ?

    Even tho this thread is called Little Jazz ....
    i still find comparisons with other amps/speakers/combos informative ....
    if you're talking about the 250w version, yes. i have a GH250 which is the same preamp and poweramp design as the jazz 50 watt head with the addition of a 2nd channel (which I do not use or like,lol)

    I like the amp. I think the basic sound of the quilter is better and i think the dv has too much bottom end. With the DV, I keep the bass on zero but with a semi or archtop I have to either use an EQ pedal or put the amp up on a chair. Otherwise, it gets boomy and/or feedsback with the archtop. The treble control is placed nicely. I can get a bensony treble tone if I want it (which isn't too often TBH but it's nice and I can't get that with the quilter).

    BUT, like I said, the fundamental tone is better with the quilter. It sounds warmer and more analog-like with a tube-like "lilt" to the sound that is very pleasing to me.
    Last edited by jzucker; 05-25-2019 at 11:33 PM.

  28. #27

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    I have been looking for a lightweight, relatively inexpensive amp to take with me on the road this summer. I was really lucky when a local guitar player decided to sell his jazz gear - a DV Mark Little Jazz and an Epiphone 175 Premium. I passed on the Epi (played exceptionally well but I am out of storage space ...) but snapped up his LJ. I've been playing it for a month or more. The tone is really good. Haven't tested outside my studio yet but I hope to do that soon.

    The LJ joins my Quilter MP-8 and the Roland Cube 60 - both inspired by reviews I've read on the forum over the years. The Quilter is the perfect jazz amp for the tone I'm striving for so I was pleasantly surprised to see how well the Little Jazz stands up to the A/B tests.

    The Cube doesn't get much use for jazz since I got the Quilter. I use it to amplify my TRIO+ or when I feel like playing surf or rock guitar and need the COSM effects.

    DV Mark Little Jazz-img_7445-jpg

  29. #28

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    After ordering a Little Jazz amp, I looked back at this thread, and noticed the comment regarding the input gain and external pedal.

    I was wondering if that is a common issue that people run into. I bought this thinking it would be a quick grab and go, easy to set up amp. Need for an external pedal to bring up the signal at the input would complicate a quick setup, and add cost.

  30. #29

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    I don't need an external pedal for mine. I do sometimes use a JR Barnyard pedal to get a vintage sound, and sometimes an external reverb pedal, just because it's there at home, but when I take it out it's mostly just the amp. And it's what I take out, because it's easy to carry and sounds about as good as the others I have. I'm not sure which comment you're referring to, but the input level seems very normal to me. It does take pedals well, but they're not necessary. YMMV, but I just turn it on, plug it in, set the tone controls flat, and play. Sometimes I lower the treble, maybe the bass, just a touch, occasionally increase the mid a little, but seldom more than a few degrees. I've played very loud blues jams with the volume barely above halfway. I think you'll like the Little Jazz.

  31. #30

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    Quote Originally Posted by sgosnell View Post
    I don't need an external pedal for mine. I do sometimes use a JR Barnyard pedal to get a vintage sound, and sometimes an external reverb pedal, just because it's there at home, but when I take it out it's mostly just the amp. And it's what I take out, because it's easy to carry and sounds about as good as the others I have. I'm not sure which comment you're referring to, but the input level seems very normal to me. It does take pedals well, but they're not necessary. YMMV, but I just turn it on, plug it in, set the tone controls flat, and play. Sometimes I lower the treble, maybe the bass, just a touch, occasionally increase the mid a little, but seldom more than a few degrees. I've played very loud blues jams with the volume barely above halfway. I think you'll like the Little Jazz.

    I was referencing the original post in this thread, 4th paragraph:

    "My initial impression, playing alone in the practice room is that it is not a particularly loud amp, with a Roland 40x that I often use seeming significantly louder (that one has a bigger speaker, but probably similar wattage). When I cranked the Master to 3 o'clock, I didn't care for the sound on chords. It seemed distorted to me. But, when I cranked the output of my ME80 up to the max, the input stage of the Little Jazz didn't seem to mind and I got a louder, but still clean, sound. The amp bothered me less on lead lines, where I don't mind a little bit of distortion that much."

  32. #31

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    I think what he's referring to is that the Little Jazz will accept hotter input signals well, without much if any distortion. It sounds good with the JR Barnyard in boost mode. But it doesn't need a hotter signal, it just deals with it very well if it's there.

  33. #32

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    I've been underwhelmed the few times I've been at shows and pros have been using the Little Jazz. I don't think it has the headroom for a professional jazz performance with a drummer using sticks - yes it will sound OK most of the time, but it will reveal its limitations at other times too and I find that unprofessional.

  34. #33

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    Quote Originally Posted by coolvinny View Post
    I've been underwhelmed the few times I've been at shows and pros have been using the Little Jazz. I don't think it has the headroom for a professional jazz performance with a drummer using sticks - yes it will sound OK most of the time, but it will reveal its limitations at other times too and I find that unprofessional.
    I am usually playing duo with a bass player with no drummer. For the situation you describe, do you think any of the other small popular amps would be any better? (e.g. Henriksen Bud, AER Compact 60, Quilter MicroPro 8" combo)

  35. #34

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    If you play in situations where the Little Jazz isn't loud enough, I don't want to be there. Not in the band, not in the audience, even in the back. That's too loud to be comfortable for listening.

  36. #35

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    Everybody's got their preferences. The two times I've been underwhelmed was when it was a guitar-led trio or quartet (different guitarists). I'm telling you, the amp was farting out at times at higher volumes/intensity and it was unprofessional to say the least. I think the price is right - just be aware of its limitations.

  37. #36

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    Quote Originally Posted by coolvinny View Post
    Everybody's got their preferences. The two times I've been underwhelmed was when it was a guitar-led trio or quartet (different guitarists). I'm telling you, the amp was farting out at times at higher volumes/intensity and it was unprofessional to say the least. I think the price is right - just be aware of its limitations.
    Do you have a preference for anything that weighs 20 lbs or less? I have flexibility when it comes to cost, but my days of moving boat anchors are over.
    Last edited by DanielleOM; 07-19-2019 at 02:14 PM. Reason: spelling correction

  38. #37

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    Quote Originally Posted by DanielleOM View Post
    Do you have a preference for anything that weighs 20 lbs or less? I have flexibility when it comes to cost, but my days of moving boat anchors are over.
    Wow - some folks seem really offended by any criticism of the Little Jazz. Look, to my ears, in the sub-20lbs range, Henriksen and Mambo are considerably better than the LJ away based on what I've heard. But for the money the LJ seems pretty good.

  39. #38

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    Quote Originally Posted by coolvinny View Post
    Wow - some folks seem really offended by any criticism of the Little Jazz. Look, to my ears, in the sub-20lbs range, Henriksen and Mambo are considerably better than the LJ away based on what I've heard. But for the money the LJ seems pretty good.
    Thank you for your thoughts on this.

    Since it's on it's way here, I will give it a try and see what my experience is. I will cross my fingers and hope I don't bang that white finish up first night out. I will listen carefully for any sound deterioration or unpleasant compression as volume is raised. I will bring it out and see if others give it a thumbs up or down at the venue where I plan to use it. I thought I would give it a try, as the sound seems very seductive in the You Tube videos.

    I did try an older Henriksen amp, blue front, with black grill, in a store briefly a few years ago. That particular one did not appeal to me. It seemed incredibly dry sounding to me. There might have been a problem with it as it also seemed a little noisy to me. I was a little hesitant to order one.

  40. #39

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    A thought about the headroom on the Little Jazz ... I own both a Little Jazz and an DV Mark Micro 50 head powering a Buscarino Chameleon cabinet. My understanding is that the amp sections are identical. I just did a volume comparison of the two rigs. With as close as I could get to identical amp settings, using the same guitar with the exactly same settings, my head/cab rig is much louder and has much ore headroom than my LJ combo. So if the Little Jazz is farting out at higher volumes, I would suspect that the first culprit would be the speaker. I'm betting that you'd get a lot more headroom out of it with an Eminence Beta 8. On the other hand, I love the sound of the LJ and who knows what changes a beefier speaker would make. Another alternative would be a Jazz 50 head with an RE NY8 cab. That's still a pretty small rig and I think it would probably sound really nice. (My experience with the NY8 is that it sounds really good with almost anything driving it).
    My CD "Bare Handed" is available as a download at Bandcamp.com
    http://jimsoloway.bandcamp.com/album/bare-handed

  41. #40

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Soloway View Post
    A thought about the headroom on the Little Jazz ... I own both a Little Jazz and an DV Mark Micro 50 head powering a Buscarino Chameleon cabinet. My understanding is that the amp sections are identical. I just did a volume comparison of the two rigs. With as close as I could get to identical amp settings, using the same guitar with the exactly same settings, my head/cab rig is much louder and has much ore headroom than my LJ combo. So if the Little Jazz is farting out at higher volumes, I would suspect that the first culprit would be the speaker. I'm betting that you'd get a lot more headroom out of it with an Eminence Beta 8. On the other hand, I love the sound of the LJ and who knows what changes a beefier speaker would make. Another alternative would be a Jazz 50 head with an RE NY8 cab. That's still a pretty small rig and I think it would probably sound really nice. (My experience with the NY8 is that it sounds really good with almost anything driving it).
    The "Little Jazz" arrived and initially I am quite pleased with it. At the volumes, I was able to tolerate at home, I like the tone without having to do a lot of adjusting. Response, attack, sustain seem consistent. I did my initial test with my Eastman AR503CE (Benedetto A6 pickup). I see why everyone complains about the blue pilot light on top. It's certainly bright. Were you thinking the Eminence Beta 8, would fit inside the Little Jazz combo cabinet? I am thinking I will have to get the Little Jazz out to the small bar setting to be really sure that it will work for me.

    I might consider separate amp and cab at a later date. For the open mic setting, I really need a combo that I can carry to the stage area in one hand. The Little Jazz should be a little lighter than the Boss Katana 50 I have been using. The Katana 50 has been working for me, however I find the sound I like can be elusive at times. I find on the Katana I have to be very careful with the gain, master, and volume setting to get the sound I like.

  42. #41

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    One of the features I really like about the Little Jazz is that it lets me carry it in one hand easily, leaving the other free for whatever else is necessary, and I can carry it for a long distance without my arm falling off. If I'm carrying it and my guitar in a hard case, they balance each other very well, about the same weight, which is a definite plus. I've played in loud bar jams where there were Katanas in use, and the LJ is at least as loud, without needing to turn it up much past 50%, with humbuckers. To be fair to the Katanas, though, they were being used to get a Fender scooped sound with single-coil Strats mostly, and very lacking in mids. With the LJ flat, it cuts through easily.

  43. #42
    Quote Originally Posted by DanielleOM View Post
    I was referencing the original post in this thread, 4th paragraph:

    "My initial impression, playing alone in the practice room is that it is not a particularly loud amp, with a Roland 40x that I often use seeming significantly louder (that one has a bigger speaker, but probably similar wattage). When I cranked the Master to 3 o'clock, I didn't care for the sound on chords. It seemed distorted to me. But, when I cranked the output of my ME80 up to the max, the input stage of the Little Jazz didn't seem to mind and I got a louder, but still clean, sound. The amp bothered me less on lead lines, where I don't mind a little bit of distortion that much."
    I wrote that after my first time trying the amp. I think I had it on a chair or something. I now use it flat on the floor. Positioning, even tilting it can make a difference. I've now been using it for 7 months. I try to avoid having the Master Volume past 2 o'clock. I haven't done any careful testing at that volume, but that's what I've been doing.

    It has been loud enough for almost everything I've done with it. That includes octet (4 horns), 19 pc big band and various smaller groups, usually with piano and drums.

    It usually sounds fine. I've read that some people consider it dark. That might be right but, for me, it may be more a feature than a bug. My Comins can sound a little fizzy in the high E and the LJ removes a lot of that.

    The exception occurred this weekend. An outdoor gig in one end of a big field with the octet. Pianist likes to be heard. I brought my JC55 instead of the LJ and was glad I did, although it's possible the LJ might have worked. I just didn't want to get caught short for volume.

  44. #43
    My experience with most smaller amps has been similar. You learn to work with them. Or you just put up with carrying a bigger amp and don't have to worry about anything, position, stand, monitor, etc. Usually I choose the smaller amp!

  45. #44

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    I brought the Little Jazz out last night. People seemed to enjoy the sound. I had been bringing a Boss Katana 50 to that weekly event. I very much appreciated the size and weight when it was time for me to leave the crowded tight stage area.

  46. #45

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    I bought my DVMLJ specifically to attend the Port Townsend Jazz Workshop. Weight and size were key considerations, as were tone and volume. I was in a practice room all week with a small combo - piano, bass, drums, trumpet, sax, clarinet, and electric violin. It was pretty loud in there but the amp was able to punch through with fidelity.

    I set the volume at 10 o'clock - which is how I typically dial-it in. I had to roll off the bass to 10 o'clock to get the punch I was looking for; I usually set it at 12 o'clock. The Mid and High dials were set to 12 o'clock, reverb to 9 o'clock - again, that's typical. With these settings, I was able to make the adjustment from comping to soloing from the volume knob on my guitar.

    When my combo performed in a large hall at the end of the week, the audio tech used the amp's direct line-out into the PA system. Essentially, the LJ was my monitor on stage while he dialed-it for the room. Our combo coach who was in the audience for the performance said my guitar sounded great through the house system.

    I have A/B tested my LJ alongside my Quilter MicroPro 8 in my studio many times. The Q is superior to my ear, but the LJ is definitely in the game tone-wise. What really surprised me, though, was how it stood up to a Fender Deluxe Reverb. Back to Port Townsend: I was rehearsing for a guitar duet and my partner was playing an archtop through the Deluxe. When I first started playing, the difference was marked. In comparison to his guitar, mine sounded thin and nasally. I dialed-in the bass on the amp and on the guitar, and I was back in business. The tone was right where I wanted it in the mix. Of course, there would have been no contest had it been a race for volume, but the two guitars sounded really good together.

    Just one person's experience submitted for the benefit of those considering the LJ.

    PS: the LJ is now taking the #2 spot in my amp quiver. I'll be putting my Cube 60 up for sale shortly.

  47. #46

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    I’ve had my DVMLJ for a few days now. I don’t gig - I jam with friends and with my son (who plays professionally). I have an Eastman AR503CE with the stock pickup and a late 90s Les Paul Elegant, also stock. Both guitars sound like a dream through the LJ. I can’t imagine ever lugging my Marshall or Gibson tube amps to a jam now that I have this LJ. I may sell them both. This is all the amp I will ever need - exactly the features I want in a combo, and none of the weight I don’t want!