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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2017
    Location
    Tinton Falls, NJ
    Posts
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    Interesting guitar: 1951 Epiphone Triumph Regent w/D'aquisto TP......

    This guitar was at an estate sale near me about a month ago and unfortunately I had to go out of town, so I was never able to take a look in person. It was part of the estate of Vinnie Bell who you may know of, but I was unfamiliar with. Some crazy stuff at the sale as I learned about his many innovations and experiments. Was wondering if any member here was the purchaser. Cool stuff!
    Attached Images Attached Images Interesting guitar: 1951 Epiphone Triumph Regent w/D'aquisto TP......-1-18-jpg Interesting guitar: 1951 Epiphone Triumph Regent w/D'aquisto TP......-resized_screenshot_20180802-192908_7391-jpg Interesting guitar: 1951 Epiphone Triumph Regent w/D'aquisto TP......-1-21-jpg Interesting guitar: 1951 Epiphone Triumph Regent w/D'aquisto TP......-1-17-jpg 
    Last edited by DMgolf66; 10-12-2018 at 09:01 AM.

  2. #2
    Oh wow I d love to have that. Not just a DA tailpiece but a whole DA makeover !
    "Oh, those jazz guys are just making that stuff up!" - Homer Jay S

    http://www.NiceGuitar.eu

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    Pacific NW
    Posts
    815
    I was told by a knowledgable luthier that during this period Epiphone was using up their premium woods. Sure looks great. Bet it Sounds good too.

  4. #4
    That's awesome. I don't really know much about post-war Epiphones. Was the Triumph regent a carved or laminate guitar? I think they look really awesome, and I love the classic violin finish they did in this period.

    Trevor Giancola (great player from Toronto) plays a Triumph Regent with a Dynasonic.

    Interesting guitar: 1951 Epiphone Triumph Regent w/D'aquisto TP......-screen-shot-2018-10-12-7-50-03-am-jpg

  5. #5
    Was this the Vinny Bell that was involved in the electric sitar? The instrument behind the Epi kinda looks like one?
    I'm a big fan of Epi's and love my 1953 Triumph Regent. She's totally acoustic never had a pickup mounted. Some folks don't care for the neck profile however I never had a issue with it.
    Cool guitar. Here's mine:
    Attached Images Attached Images Interesting guitar: 1951 Epiphone Triumph Regent w/D'aquisto TP......-epiatsprings-jpg 

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2017
    Location
    Tinton Falls, NJ
    Posts
    125
    Quote Originally Posted by SierraTango View Post
    Was this the Vinny Bell that was involved in the electric sitar?
    Yes, sir! I can post the link to the site for the sale even though it has ended. It shows all of the guitars, amps and experiments he had going on.

    What is with their neck profile?

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    Pacific NW
    Posts
    815
    Here is a description from Joe V's archtop. com from a '53. They are solid carved, and somewhat rare like an L7C:

    "The rare cutaway version of Epi's most popular professional archtop, the Triumph Regent was introduced in 1949, with a production run of only about five years. Accordingly the Regent is a much scarcer item than the non-cutaway Triumph, or its Gibson counterpart, the L-7C. The Epiphone cutaway is several frets deeper than its Gibson counterpart, and allows enhanced access to the uppermost frets, and the peghead mounted adjustable truss rod is a feature seen only in the last few years of this model's production.Stored unplayed for decades, this remarkable guitar has the rich glow of a gorgeous vintage sunburst finish. Carved of all solid tonewoods, the guitar is notably lightweight at just 5lb 13oz , and deftly balanced on the lap or the strap. Carefully maintained, the guitar is free of cracks, pick, buckle, thumb or fingerboard wear, and has fresh pro fretwork in gleaming condition. All binding is original and tight to the body, and the original Pat. Pend. Frequensator tailpiece is rock solid. A pure acoustic warrior, the guitar has never had a pickup attached, and apart from a patch of finish touchup below the treble soundhole, appears otherwise strikingly pristine.
    This guitar is equipped with its original 16X1 epsilon logo tuners, and a vintage correct bound tortoise pickguard, complete with epsilon logo badge. The action is smooth and low over the solid Brazilian rosewood fingerboard, with a classic Epiphone light vee profile neck, and a fresh high precision setup. (And while the later Gibson-made versions of this model had necks as skinny as 1 9/16", these New York label Epis all have the generous full size 1 11/16" fingerboards.) The voice is clear and forward, with the cutting power for which Epis are justifiably famous. These original Epi Regents are some of the very few acoustic cutaways to rival the better noncuts in pure volume, projection and overall tonal response.
    An outstanding example of a rare '50s all-carved cutaway, and a true best buy in a golden era New York built archtop guitar."

  8. #8
    The Triumph was a carved guitar, and was in the market to compete with the Gibson L-7. The Deluxe was fancier and competed with the L-5, the Emperor at 18" lower bout went up against the Super 400. There are lots of Epi experts/owners on this forum.

    The neck profile on mine is a deep and pronounced V which some folks don't care for. The V shape seemed to be more common in the early 50's Epi's: I owned a '49 Triumph "Cutaway" (Early cutaways stated cutaway on the label before they started calling cutaway models "Regent") and the neck was flatter. It's not a problem for me but takes a little technique adjustment after playing my Benedetto Cremona.
    Attached Images Attached Images Interesting guitar: 1951 Epiphone Triumph Regent w/D'aquisto TP......-53-tr-1-jpg 

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by omphalopsychos View Post
    That's awesome. I don't really know much about post-war Epiphones. Was the Triumph regent a carved or laminate guitar? I think they look really awesome, and I love the classic violin finish they did in this period.

    Trevor Giancola (great player from Toronto) plays a Triumph Regent with a Dynasonic.

    Interesting guitar: 1951 Epiphone Triumph Regent w/D'aquisto TP......-screen-shot-2018-10-12-7-50-03-am-jpg
    In regards to the violin finish, that was never a factory option. Sunburst or Blonde were the choices. If you see any other finish, the guitar has most likely been refinished at some point in it's life. Refinishing is common in a lot of vintage Epi's: many of them suffer from binding separation, particularly in the waist area. Hide glue was used on these and it fails after 60 or so years on some guitars depending on how it's been looked after. So many vintage Epi's have been refin-ed as part of the binding repair/replacement process. Also, many Sunbursts were refinished to Blonde.
    Keep in mind if shopping...

  10. #10
    Both the electric and acoustic referred to are refinished.
    Bell's name appears in the DA ledger in '54 for an Excel.
    Maybe that guitar was sold prior to the sale.
    I can't remember seeing a D'Aquisto tailpiece on a guitar other than his, though I have seen D'Angelico t.p.s on a fewGibsons. I remember back in the day Mandolin Brothers had a blonde '39 Super 400P w/a D'Angelico neck.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Oct 2017
    Location
    Tinton Falls, NJ
    Posts
    125
    For those interested, this is pretty fascinating. Pics of all the guitars and evil experiments:

    Estate/Tag Sale Inside Private Home in Tenafly, NJ starts on 9/14/2018

  12. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by skykomishone View Post
    Here is a description from Joe V's archtop. com from a '53. They are solid carved, and somewhat rare like an L7C:

    "The rare cutaway version of Epi's most popular professional archtop, the Triumph Regent was introduced in 1949, with a production run of only about five years. Accordingly the Regent is a much scarcer item than the non-cutaway Triumph, or its Gibson counterpart, the L-7C. The Epiphone cutaway is several frets deeper than its Gibson counterpart, and allows enhanced access to the uppermost frets, and the peghead mounted adjustable truss rod is a feature seen only in the last few years of this model's production.Stored unplayed for decades, this remarkable guitar has the rich glow of a gorgeous vintage sunburst finish. Carved of all solid tonewoods, the guitar is notably lightweight at just 5lb 13oz , and deftly balanced on the lap or the strap. Carefully maintained, the guitar is free of cracks, pick, buckle, thumb or fingerboard wear, and has fresh pro fretwork in gleaming condition. All binding is original and tight to the body, and the original Pat. Pend. Frequensator tailpiece is rock solid. A pure acoustic warrior, the guitar has never had a pickup attached, and apart from a patch of finish touchup below the treble soundhole, appears otherwise strikingly pristine.
    This guitar is equipped with its original 16X1 epsilon logo tuners, and a vintage correct bound tortoise pickguard, complete with epsilon logo badge. The action is smooth and low over the solid Brazilian rosewood fingerboard, with a classic Epiphone light vee profile neck, and a fresh high precision setup. (And while the later Gibson-made versions of this model had necks as skinny as 1 9/16", these New York label Epis all have the generous full size 1 11/16" fingerboards.) The voice is clear and forward, with the cutting power for which Epis are justifiably famous. These original Epi Regents are some of the very few acoustic cutaways to rival the better noncuts in pure volume, projection and overall tonal response.
    An outstanding example of a rare '50s all-carved cutaway, and a true best buy in a golden era New York built archtop guitar."
    In point of fact this description from Joe V's website is for my '53. I had wanted to replace my '49 for for about 18 years after I (stupidly) traded it off to Fred Walecki for a Parker Fly Artist. In my defense, the Parker was the tool I needed to make a living at the time. And a superb instrument.

    My understanding is by '53 Epiphone had moved production to Philly, however the label states NY.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    Pacific NW
    Posts
    815
    ST, obviously the '53 Epi left a serious impression. IMHO, vintage Epiphone's are awesome instruments. I purchased a '36 Emperor (#10460), and it's without equal where size and acoustic sound matter. There's a reason it was called 'Emperor', it's loud and a real horn killer. The quality of the craftsmanship is astounding. What a beautiful guitar. The label reads 'Epiphone Banjo Company, Long Island City, NY'. Light as a feather too.

  14. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by SierraTango View Post
    In regards to the violin finish, that was never a factory option. Sunburst or Blonde were the choices. If you see any other finish, the guitar has most likely been refinished at some point in it's life. Refinishing is common in a lot of vintage Epi's: many of them suffer from binding separation, particularly in the waist area. Hide glue was used on these and it fails after 60 or so years on some guitars depending on how it's been looked after. So many vintage Epi's have been refin-ed as part of the binding repair/replacement process. Also, many Sunbursts were refinished to Blonde.
    Keep in mind if shopping...
    That's good to know, even though I'm not in the market. I unfortunately can't play 17" archtops.

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