Reply to Thread Bookmark Thread
Page 1 of 5 123 ... LastLast
Posts 1 to 50 of 250
  1. #1

    User Info Menu

    My favourite guitars sounds are generally from 60+ years ago.
    This is reflected in my preference for big bobbin single coil pickups in my guitars (CC, P-90s, Dynasonics etc.).

    Recently I bought a DV Mark Little Jazz, it's a great little amp but it's firmly rooted in the solid state/Polytone kind of character. With my archtops it sounds great but it's a more modern sound I typically go for.

    My other amp is a Quilter Aviator, also solid state but it responds in a more tube-like manner than the DV Mark, especially on the second channel.

    This pedal is designed to emulate the character of the old Gibson amps of the 30s/40s (the EH-185). There are very few good demos of this pedal on the internet. I was worried it would have far too much gain and make things sound boxy. It's also fairly expensive. Based on the large amount of positive written feedback I decided to buy it.

    Anyway, it's really good.

    It actually doesn't colour the sound of the amp much at all. What it does do is change how the amp responds to dynamics. If you dig in on double stops for example, there is the tiniest bit of break up - but it's subtle and warm sounding. It sounds great with both the Quilter and the DV Mark.

    It also adds a bit of compression, but again it's very subtle and very much like an old tube amp.
    It attenuates the more extreme highs (these are what often tend to make an amp "sterile" or hi-fi sounding).

    So far I'm really impressed, playing Charlie Christian licks hasn't been more fun or authentic sounding. Another sound that it does well is that thick "on the edge of headroom" clean sound - just like the sound Johnny Smith has on the "Moonlight in Vermont" album.

    I think it'll be very useful when I need to use a backline amp such as a Twin or JC-120 and want that slightly more ''smaller tube amp'' kind of response.

    Nocturne The Jr. Barnyard Preamp-jr-barnyard-png

  2.  

    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #2

    User Info Menu

    nice!!! enjoy... tavo @ nocturne tried to give a little true vintage octal tube tone to modern amps...with a pedal

    he's also got a new model that combines the barnyard with a reverb...the el pescadoro....his tribute to early classic chicago electric blues tones..



    cheers

  4. #3

    User Info Menu



    I try not to leave home without this. Outside of my house, I frequently plug into Blues Juniors, Rolands, Polytones, and weird Fender modeling amps. Over years, I have grown to be entirely distrustful of others, especially amps. The Jr Barnyard comes with me if I know I'm going to be plugging into one of these amps. I have a cool octal preamp amplifier by Vintage 47, but I don't always take it with me. This pedal has been a life saver for getting a great sound through solid state amps.

    Neatomic, I had noticed the El Pescadoro, but I had no idea it had a Jr Barnyard Preamp. Gotta check out some demos. Anything Tavo makes is gold, and I'd love to consolidate pedals as much as possible. I've been occasionally assembling a pedal board ad hoc at rehearsals and I'm getting sick of it. A one-stop-shop for gain and reverb sounds great.
    Last edited by omphalopsychos; 10-03-2018 at 10:09 PM.

  5. #4

    User Info Menu

    Man, Tavo really knows how to sell a product. Form a grestchpages post:

    Maybelline by Chuck Berry or Bo Diddley's first hit Road Runner of Chess's Checker label, you hear that sound. In the first 12 seconds of Etta James "at last" you hear a dramatic shift of the studio space around the strings, to an upfront sound of string and then her voice hits enveloped in natural reverb. Universal Recording and Chess Records had a beautifully dense, warm, and open quality. Early on it was chambers and later in the 50's it was both chamber, drainpipe mics hanging down in the basement AND 600lbs electroplate EMT. No springs there and not really any particular room but a culmination of sounds from blaring guitar amps in the recording space, and that sound in the tube mixing console sent through a floor drainpipe w a speaker into a basement to ribbon and tube mics.. not to mention the melding of the EMT 140 mechanical steel plates and magnetic drivers. Its a 50's haunting bloom that is neither tape echo or reverberating 60's springs. The irony is this is a live sound that surrounds a guitar in a mix, its not an on-top surface effect, that drippy springs created in the 60s.. its the underneath, below the chop of the waves churn and boil. The darkness of salty kelp fingers reaching up from in the shallows of the waterfront's glimmering blue twilight. Or even the River bottom's silty turbulence murmuring beneath the winding edges of city streets.

  6. #5
    I did see the El Pescadoro but I ended up opting for the Jr Barnyard as it was a bit cheaper and I didn't really need reverb.

    While it has nothing to do with how it sounds, I love the look of the El Pescadoro.

    Tonight I have a gig, I'll be using the Jr. Barnyard with my DV Little Jazz. Really keen to hear how it sounds in a band setting.

  7. #6

    User Info Menu

    I'd be more interested in how one of these reacts with a BF amp like a Deluxe. I'm interested in "smaller amp response" but NOT "smaller amp sound", if you follow. Meaning I don't want a boxy sound, but I do want a bit of that breakup with tamed transients.

  8. #7

    User Info Menu

    Sounds like a really cool pedal (I dig octal sounds myself). Congratulations, and play it in good health!

  9. #8

    User Info Menu

    I’ve been using mine with an old 100-watt Ultrasound “acoustic” amp and an archtop with a reissue DeArmond pickup for rhythm (boost off) and soloing (boost on) in big bands and smaller groups. It just nails that classic single coil sound.

  10. #9

    User Info Menu

    I really regret that I haven't really had the chance to test out the Jr. Barnyard as much as I would have liked by now.
    I've only gotten to use it on two gigs, and although it sounded awesome, the plug-and-play nature of my regular amps (a '39 EH-185 and a Vintage '47 VA-185G) as been a bit easier than bringing a pedal with adapter, plus a separate head and separate cab (the Jr. into a Quilter 101 Mini into a V'47 Cab with an Emmenence Lil Texas).

    That said, I have something coming up next week I should use it on....

    I'm also hoping to do a demo video with the pedal / quilter combo comparing it to the original EH-185.

    But, I will say in my limited testing, I've been stoked at the sound of the Jr. Barnyard.

  11. #10

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by D.G.
    I'd be more interested in how one of these reacts with a BF amp like a Deluxe. I'm interested in "smaller amp response" but NOT "smaller amp sound", if you follow. Meaning I don't want a boxy sound, but I do want a bit of that breakup with tamed transients.
    I have played it trough my PRRI with great success, although the difference of pedal on vs pedal off on a clean tube amp is different than on a solid state. A solid state amp typically does not compress your signal, while this pedal does compress and saturate it. So if you’re plugged into a quilter or a Henriksen, you will probably hear a stark difference. Because a clean tube amp is already compressing your sound a bit, the difference will be less noticeable at low gain settings. Let’s be clear: this pedal isn’t an equalizer, it’s a drive circuit. The specific appeal of this pedal is that the drive circuit replicates the response characteristics of old octal amps. The pedal does not make the sound boxy at all, meaning it doesn’t noticeably attenuate treble. The thickening effect doesn’t come from rolling treble off, it comes from increasing gain and compression, much like a low-watt amp. It has a Low Pass Filter switch that allows you to roll treble if you want. I like to plug this pedal into a Henriksen because the Henriksen EQ is so flexible, between the EQ of the Henriksen and the drive of the Jr I can get really close to the sound of my Vintage 47.

  12. #11
    My gig last night using the Jr. Barnyard went well!

    I used my early 80's Epiphone Emperor "F" with Gabojo Lab Dynasonics into the Little Jazz. The Jr Barnyard really complimented the sound of both that guitar and the amp. It still sounded like my DV Mark amp, but it was responding to dynamics like an octal tube amp.

    What I particularly like is the "bright/woolly" switch - it tames the sometimes slightly clangy top end of the Dynasonics. This isn't an issue with all amps, it's mainly with more high-headroom amps I encounter this. With this switch on, it still had clarity and brightness but the treble was much richer sounding.

    The group I was playing with last night do several Benny Goodman/CC tunes, even with Dynasonic pickups that Charlie Christian sound was there. Pretty amazing considering I was using a 1x8'' solid state combo amp.

    When playing chord solos, there's this really nice bit of break up, but it doesn't hit the treble, it's all in the bottom end. It's very pleasing to the ear. We do a few Johnny Smith arrangements and it made those close voicing chords bigger and bolder sounding than otherwise.

  13. #12

    User Info Menu

    Off topic a bit ....

    That Quilter pro block sounds great anyway
    It's got a nice bit of breakup on it already
    Probably enough for me ....
    (unless it's just the youtube breaking up)

  14. #13
    That demo with the Quilter has a lot of break up, far more than I get from the pedal.
    Maybe the P-90s are hotter than my Dynasonics? or there's already some gain coming from the Quilter.
    The Barnyard does add a bit of volume when on so maybe that's pushing the front end of the Quilter.

  15. #14

    User Info Menu

    I’m pretty certain those p90s are hotter than your Gabojos. I have both and that’s my experience, at least. I have no clue how high you set your Gabojo. I also think a lot of the clipping in this video is coming from input gain into his recording device being too high.

  16. #15

    User Info Menu

    it's not about just adding distortion..its the type of distortion..octal tubes differ greatly from more modern 12ax7 pre amp tubes...octals are lower gain, and cleaner until pushed..then they get a unique harmonic distortion...ruff edged...12ax7's have a much smoother harmonic distortion

    so your not so much just adding more crunch , but adding a different type of vintage sounding crunch

    cheers

  17. #16

    User Info Menu

    Just put in an order for the El Pescadoro. Based on how much they overlap, I just may have a JR Barnyard to sell to someone.

    kwik bit of knoodlin’ w EL PESCADORO/... - Tavo Garcia Vega | Facebook

  18. #17

    User Info Menu

    This discussion inspired me to bring my Quilter/Barnyard rig to last night's gig. I was working as a sideman, and in this particular band, I often feel like my original 185 and my Vintage '47 are both a bit underpowered.

    Well, it worked like a friggin' charm.
    Nocturne The Jr. Barnyard Preamp-quilter-jr-barnyard-jpg

    Because I had so much headroom, I was able to keep my guitar volume low, which sounded great.
    Now, it's not exactly the same exact feel as an Octal Tube amp, but it's such a huge improvement over later style amps that just sound "wrong" for the tone I need. And the substantial increase in headroom/volume more than madeup for the difference. It made me play BETTER because I could relax and hear myself, instead of playing physically harder.

    I'm definitely a big fan of the Jr. Barynard. I've started packing it as a backup on our traveling gigs even when I know I'll be provided a good backline amp, just in case. And we've got a couple gigs coming up where I have no idea what I'll end up with, so I'll have some more opportunities to test it out coming up.

  19. #18

    User Info Menu

    Stout do you use the preamp boost (the "hot stomp", i.e. the right footswitch)? I see you have turned almost all the way down, which is similar to how I've been using it: the preamp boost is on, but barely, the pedal volume is set slightly above unity gain. Another setting I've come to love is to drop the preamp gain on my Henriksen to zero and have the Barnyard volume turned up really high to compensate. Essentially I'm replacing the amp's preamp with the Barnyard. The tone just gets so thick and saturated without becoming too overdriven or muddy.

    Tavo, man. He's a one of a kind that's for sure.

  20. #19

    User Info Menu

    I'm thinking about buying this one. I really would love to have a V47 or EH-180/185 but here in Brazil is not easy to import amplifiers.

  21. #20

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by omphalopsychos
    Stout do you use the preamp boost (the "hot stomp", i.e. the right footswitch)? I see you have turned almost all the way down, which is similar to how I've been using it: the preamp boost is on, but barely, the pedal volume is set slightly above unity gain. Another setting I've come to love is to drop the preamp gain on my Henriksen to zero and have the Barnyard volume turned up really high to compensate. Essentially I'm replacing the amp's preamp with the Barnyard. The tone just gets so thick and saturated without becoming too overdriven or muddy.

    Tavo, man. He's a one of a kind that's for sure.
    I think you can see the settings in the photo, but you probably can't see that both lights are ON.

  22. #21
    Really glad to hear from Campus Five re. this pedal. I've not been able to compare it to a real octal amp so it's good to hear that it compares in a favourable way, especially using a SS Quilter amp.

    I've been using mine mainly with the 'normal' side on 11 o'clock or so - haven't really explored using the 'hot' side of it yet.

    Last night I used it with my 73 Les Paul Recording at a quartet gig. The Barnyard stayed pretty much clean but there's this beautiful depth of tone that wasn't there before. If you dig in really hard there's the tiniest bit of breakup, but it's so subtle. I had it running through the DV Little Jazz. I don't think I can use that amp without the Barnyard now, there's no going back.

    I have another gig tonight, I'll have a go turning on the 'hot' side, with the level down similar to how Mr. Stout has his. It's a bigger venue, so I'll be dragging out my Quilter Aviator Twin Ten. Going to try it with my Gretsch G400- it has a floating vintage vibe CC pickup.

  23. #22

    User Info Menu

    Does it do that thing on some of CCs
    recordings when the double stops
    (2 note chords) only/mainly get distorted ?

    I love that !
    Maybe it's a speaker thing tho ...

  24. #23
    It does that for me, mainly when the guitar volume is turned up a bit to about 8 or so. It's a real subtle distortion but sounds so good.

  25. #24

    User Info Menu

    the bigger and cleaner the amp you plug the barnyard into, the more it's distinctive octal flavor will come thru...since the amp will not be generating its own distortion on top of the pedal's....also run it at unity gain or close to it...back off your guitar knobs and dial in your tone with the guitar...so that turning up your guitar will hit the barnyard harder, and it will crunch more...find your sweetspot


    and yes the doublestops really sound cool with octals...since the interaction between the notes and the octals slightly off harmonic crunch give it all sorts of rich and strange overtones


    cheers
    Last edited by neatomic; 10-11-2018 at 07:28 PM. Reason: sp-

  26. #25

    User Info Menu

    So great to hear raves about Tavo's stuff! The only reason I haven't bought a Barnyard yet is I need another hollowbody for it... I don't have much interest using it with my Grestch (Filtertrons), I really want a P90/CC hollowbody to use it with... so when I buy a Loar 309 or Godin Kingpin or whatever, I'll get a Barnyard too.

    Because that Charlie Christian "double stop dirt" thing is what I'm going for too!

  27. #26

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by ruger9
    So great to hear raves about Tavo's stuff! The only reason I haven't bought a Barnyard yet is I need another hollowbody for it... I don't have much interest using it with my Grestch (Filtertrons), I really want a P90/CC hollowbody to use it with... so when I buy a Loar 309 or Godin Kingpin or whatever, I'll get a Barnyard too.

    Because that Charlie Christian "double stop dirt" thing is what I'm going for too!
    With my Godin Kingpin, Epi 295 or Gretsch Setzer hot rod, this thing sounds great into my V47 185 amp... With the Junior Barnyard and Mystery Brain, i get amazing tones.

    Pick one up and enjoy it with Filtertrons because they sound great together. Then when you get a new hollow body, you'll already have the JR Barnyard.

  28. #27

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by campusfive
    This discussion inspired me to bring my Quilter/Barnyard rig to last night's gig. I was working as a sideman, and in this particular band, I often feel like my original 185 and my Vintage '47 are both a bit underpowered.

    Well, it worked like a friggin' charm.
    Nocturne The Jr. Barnyard Preamp-quilter-jr-barnyard-jpg

    Because I had so much headroom, I was able to keep my guitar volume low, which sounded great.
    Now, it's not exactly the same exact feel as an Octal Tube amp, but it's such a huge improvement over later style amps that just sound "wrong" for the tone I need. And the substantial increase in headroom/volume more than madeup for the difference. It made me play BETTER because I could relax and hear myself, instead of playing physically harder.

    I'm definitely a big fan of the Jr. Barynard. I've started packing it as a backup on our traveling gigs even when I know I'll be provided a good backline amp, just in case. And we've got a couple gigs coming up where I have no idea what I'll end up with, so I'll have some more opportunities to test it out coming up.
    Did you played swing rhythm in this gig too? Did you turn off the pedal or just decreasing guitar volume it's stop to crunch?
    Well I did the question to Jonathan but anyone with the pedal can answer, of course.
    Last edited by clebergf; 10-13-2018 at 08:24 PM.

  29. #28

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by clebergf
    Did you played swing rhythm in this gig too? Did you turn off the pedal or just decreasing guitar volume it's stop to crunch?
    Well I did the question to Jonathan by anyone with the pedal can answer, of course.
    I don't use the pedal, but from my experience, playing the octal tube amp, when I play rhythm I strum very lightly rather than turning down volume. If the pedal does emulate the sound right, it might work the same way. It's a very dynamic type of amp. There is only one condition- it works much better with a single coil pickup. With humbuckers the dynamics almost disappear, and the crunch doesn't clean up with lighter touch.

    I hope that makes sense.

  30. #29

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by campusfive
    This discussion inspired me to bring my Quilter/Barnyard rig to last night's gig. I was working as a sideman, and in this particular band, I often feel like my original 185 and my Vintage '47 are both a bit underpowered.

    Well, it worked like a friggin' charm.
    Nocturne The Jr. Barnyard Preamp-quilter-jr-barnyard-jpg

    Because I had so much headroom, I was able to keep my guitar volume low, which sounded great.
    Now, it's not exactly the same exact feel as an Octal Tube amp, but it's such a huge improvement over later style amps that just sound "wrong" for the tone I need. And the substantial increase in headroom/volume more than madeup for the difference. It made me play BETTER because I could relax and hear myself, instead of playing physically harder.

    I'm definitely a big fan of the Jr. Barynard. I've started packing it as a backup on our traveling gigs even when I know I'll be provided a good backline amp, just in case. And we've got a couple gigs coming up where I have no idea what I'll end up with, so I'll have some more opportunities to test it out coming up.
    I would love to hear some clips of this rig. I've been meaning to piece together a similar rig but using the Quilter Overdrive 200 head just because it's got a direct out. My trio plays a bunch of banquet/fund raiser type gigs where there is sound reinforcement but not really anyone that is used to mixing a band or engineering. I don't want to buy a mic and bring it for those gigs. Alternatively, I could just try a Jr. Barnyard pedal with my MicroPro but I could very easily build a speaker cabinet to house the head and pedal quite easily and it would look cooler. The only thing about the Jr. Barnyard pedal that has scared me off is that it really seems to be for adding dirt and I don't want the dirt I just want the girth that these amps bring to the high end. Really my problem is the same as what you deal with all the time-I just want that sound but I need it at greater volumes than the original equipment can handle. I've got a couple of great sounding all octal amps but I play a lot of gigs where I can't use them so I need another solution.

  31. #30

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by Hep To The Jive
    I don't use the pedal, but from my experience, playing the octal tube amp, when I play rhythm I strum very lightly rather than turning down volume. If the pedal does emulate the sound right, it might work the same way. It's a very dynamic type of amp. There is only one condition- it works much better with a single coil pickup. With humbuckers the dynamics almost disappear, and the crunch doesn't clean up with lighter touch.

    I hope that makes sense.

    Great Hep. I hope that the pedal response is something like this too.
    I really would love to have a V47, but for now I can't afford one, so I'm looking for a way to this sound.
    I'll use it with a P90 from my Godin 5th Av. and with a Pete Biltoft CC's pickups that I'll install in my L-5 replica that a Brazilian luthier is doing for me.

  32. #31

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by clebergf
    Did you played swing rhythm in this gig too? Did you turn off the pedal or just decreasing guitar volume it's stop to crunch?
    Well I did the question to Jonathan by anyone with the pedal can answer, of course.
    Clebergf, the pedal will give you that exact response. You can set it to be clean but it will grind as you start to dig in.

  33. #32

    User Info Menu

    I'm a fan--and I have 4 1/2 octal tube amps. I used the Jr. Barnyard last night at a small venue where we play very quiet with a Fender Tweed Pro Junior, and just a little of the Barnyard for flavor (and some reverb) to fatten the tone. I also use it sometimes with one of my octal amps to boost etc. I've also found it handy to use it to tame an amp that's a little hot. My brown Fender Deluxe with a Tone Tubby Red speaker is sometimes too loud, and rather than turn it down I'll use the Barnyard kind of like a master volume to be able to get a signal that's less "hot" without thinning things out too much.

  34. #33
    Here's a clip of me using my Jr Barnyard into my Quilter Aviator. I'm going for a fat clean sound.
    The guitar is an 80's Epi Emperor "F" with Gabojo Dynasonics.


    It's a poor quality recording in a noisy room, I can hear that octal tube character coming through.

    When I get around to it I'll recording something a bit better. This was recorded mainly for me to get an idea of how I was sounding after the gig.

    BTW this is using only the 'preamp' side of the Jr Barnyard turned up to about 11 o'clock, I didn't have the boost on.

  35. #34

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by entresz
    Here's a clip of me using my Jr Barnyard into my Quilter Aviator. I'm going for a fat clean sound.
    The guitar is an 80's Epi Emperor "F" with Gabojo Dynasonics.


    It's a poor quality recording in a noisy room, I can hear that octal tube character coming through.

    When I get around to it I'll recording something a bit better. This was recorded mainly for me to get an idea of how I was sounding after the gig.

    BTW this is using only the 'preamp' side of the Jr Barnyard turned up to about 11 o'clock, I didn't have the boost on.
    Sounds good! Yet, I don't hear any (slight) break up or compression of the octals, which is to me IS the character. Even if you're not going for that, it kinda happens anyway, at least on mine it does.

    Btw, not for nothing, but with the profile like that you oughtta be in movies or something.

  36. #35
    The thought of me being in movies is a frightening one!

    Thanks for the kind words!

    It's pretty subtle - the compression is there, the Dynas in that guitar are pretty 'snappy' sounding, particularly through the Quilter. The Barnyard softens that response considerably. Using a P-90 or a CC pickup would have resulted in a bit more drive and compression. The Dynas despite the fairly high DC resistance (11k ish) are fairly low in actual output.

  37. #36

    User Info Menu

    Entresz, thanks for the clip. That sounded great (both playing and tone).

  38. #37

    User Info Menu

    Great tone & playing!

  39. #38

    User Info Menu

    yeah nice western swing vibe definitely heard...but i hear what hep is saying..a little more octal crunch...should easily be able to get with the dynasonic type pups..they have great growl..they have high resistance figures not cause they are hot, but because they are wound with thin wire..the originals used #44 or #45...i'd bet your new humbucker sized version uses #43...so the resistance still goes up over 10K, but its still relatively clean

    cheers

  40. #39

    User Info Menu

    I'll just highlight:

    Quote Originally Posted by entresz

    BTW this is using only the 'preamp' side of the Jr Barnyard turned up to about 11 o'clock, I didn't have the boost on.

    Yeah, this pedal, when used with low output pickups and without using the boost switch, will thicken your tone without distorting much. I have those Gabojos and they're not all that hot, and I have mine really close to the strings. So the cleanness of the sound doesn't surprise me. I'll see about recording some stuff with this pedal tonight with the gabojos. I think the boost switch makes a difference in the clipping characteristics, even with the boost set to the lowest value. This discussion highlights what I like to much about this pedal. It's not just a little octal amp in a box. It's an octal amp in a box with variable headroom determined by a boost control. You can get as much or as little headroom as you like by combining this with a solid state amp like a quilter.

  41. #40
    Thanks for the kind words everyone!!

    Yes, in that video I was going for a clean but fat sound. Wasn't going for any distortion.

    I had another gig last night, I used the same 'rig' as in the video. This time I used the boost side of the Barnyard with the gain set to about 11 o'clock, the 'normal' side was set to about 11 o'clock too. This resulted in a nice bit of break up that could be controlled with the volume control on the guitar. The sound, even with the volume backed off a bit was so thick sounding.

    When I turned the pedal off just to compare the Quilter's sound on it's own, it sounded pretty bland and sterile in comparison. The Quilter is a very nice sounding amp, so it just goes to show that there's something pretty special about how the Barnyard sounds.

    The other thing that I did was raise my Dynas up a bit, I didn't raise them up by much. The slightest adjustments make a pretty big difference with these pickups. I checked the specs on these, they're wound with 44 gauge wire like the old ones - a nice touch! This has fattened up my guitars sound just a bit too.

    Tonight I have a big band gig - we're doing "Solo Flight" by Charlie Christian.
    That's the kind of setting where I think this pedal will really shine. I'll try to get a recording of that.

  42. #41

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by entresz

    The other thing that I did was raise my Dynas up a bit, I didn't raise them up by much. The slightest adjustments make a pretty big difference with these pickups. I checked the specs on these, they're wound with 44 gauge wire like the old ones - a nice touch! This has fattened up my guitars sound just a bit too.

    yes thats a very "nice touch"... a good sign the pickup maker really knows what he's doing!!..thin wire is tricky to work with too...kudos

    11k dyna type with #44 is gonna have output (not tone!) similar to a classic strat single coil wound (with #42) to around 6k

    btw, seymour duncan has been making humbucker sized dynas for long while..and i think tv jones offers that mount as well

    cheers

  43. #42

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by entresz
    The thought of me being in movies is a frightening one!

    Thanks for the kind words!

    It's pretty subtle - the compression is there, the Dynas in that guitar are pretty 'snappy' sounding, particularly through the Quilter. The Barnyard softens that response considerably. Using a P-90 or a CC pickup would have resulted in a bit more drive and compression. The Dynas despite the fairly high DC resistance (11k ish) are fairly low in actual output.
    Haha, nah, I just meant you got the look and the style down, if someone needs a gtr player in the movies set in 40's 50's, you'd fit in nicely. Background acting, here in NYC many musicians have a second career, if they can.

    So on an octal tube amp, no matter the volume setting, if you play a double stop and dig in, you can hear what I'm talking about. That breakup, compression, whatever, it's unmistakable, and probably the reason I wanted the amp in a first place.

    So next time try that- set it clean again, and play some double stops in your solo. I wanna hear how the pedal reacts then, that'd be the ultimate test.

  44. #43

    User Info Menu

    There was a video, someone posted a while ago, 3 pedals demoed, Barnyard, Mojomojo and something else, for the same purpose of making a sterile amp sound like an old tube ala CC. It was a Henriksen amp IIRC... . Mojomojo was very impressive, I bought it based on that and now use sometimes with my AER. Now I think maybe should've get a Barnyard...

    Anyone remember what I'm talking about?

  45. #44
    Yeah I've seen that - a really great video! I was tempted by the Mojomojo, but decided that even if I did buy the Mojomojo, I'd still end up wanting the Barnyard. So went straight to Tavo's website from there . The same person who did that video put some great sound samples up on the TDPRI forum too.

    The Barnyard just sounds so natural, it doesn't sound like a pedal plugged into an amp if that makes sense... it acts like an amp, not a pedal.

  46. #45

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by entresz
    Yeah I've seen that - a really great video! I was tempted by the Mojomojo, but decided that even if I did buy the Mojomojo, I'd still end up wanting the Barnyard. So went straight to Tavo's website from there . The same person who did that video put some great sound samples up on the TDPRI forum too.

    The Barnyard just sounds so natural, it doesn't sound like a pedal plugged into an amp if that makes sense... it acts like an amp, not a pedal.
    It really does... Its kinda funny that I bought a pedal that emulates the sound of an amp I already own. But they match so good together.. I'm not so much a jazz guitarist, but I admire jazz music and it comes out in my playing.

    I can get a tone like "Smoke on the Water" (Red Foley not Deep Purple), and a tone like "Rumble", just from adjusting the volume on my guitar and pick attack.

  47. #46

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by entresz
    Here's a clip of me using my Jr Barnyard into my Quilter Aviator. I'm going for a fat clean sound.
    The guitar is an 80's Epi Emperor "F" with Gabojo Dynasonics.


    It's a poor quality recording in a noisy room, I can hear that octal tube character coming through.

    When I get around to it I'll recording something a bit better. This was recorded mainly for me to get an idea of how I was sounding after the gig.

    BTW this is using only the 'preamp' side of the Jr Barnyard turned up to about 11 o'clock, I didn't have the boost on.
    I have a passion for this flavor of jazz, and to my ears this clip sounds great. Both the tone and playing. Way to go!

  48. #47

    User Info Menu

    I own only one "overdrive" pedal and it's a low-gain "Tim Pierce" model by Rockett Audio. When I turn down the Drive knob all the way it works like a charm in front of my Bud or Evans amp for that 40's/50's fat/furry lead tone. One feature of this pedal is especially nice in that it has an extra treble and bass eq with which I can taylor the amount of boost/cut/drive very finely , depending on the room I play in. It does not hiss at all and neither does it color the sound of my guitar, just intruduces a very slight compression/ hint of breakup !
    Just to point out an alternative to the Barnyard pedal which is not widely available....

    Used J Rockett Audio Designs Tim Pierce Boost / Overdrive | Reverb

  49. #48

    User Info Menu

    I have been looking for videos or soundclips with a different amplifier than Quilter, sounds like everyone that uses a JR Barnyard has a Quilter. hahaha.
    I'm curious about how it would sound with a clean tube amp. I'm thinking about buy a Brazilian handmade amp, that is modern, and use the Jr. to get that octal sound.

  50. #49
    There's no reason why that wouldn't work. Any amp with a good clean sound would work great with the Barnyard.

    As mentioned earlier in the thread, the more clean the amp, the more pronounced the effect of the Barnyard will be.
    I use mine with my Quilter, but I've also used it with a few other amps (including a Fender Twin), as well as a Peavey Session 400 (big SS behemoth designed for pedal steel) - all with really good results.

    What is great is that you can have that octal tube feel and character, but still have an amp with serious headroom and do gigs that an old Gibson EH185 wouldn't be able to do due to volume limitations.

  51. #50

    User Info Menu

    I bought the JB pedal a few months and surprised Tavo with my application: I'm running it with my Gibson L7 straight into a Fishman column array PA for gigs. I also have a Quilter MP200-8 but don't like the tone as much with that, not quite clean enough. But the JB works almost like an amp modeler pedal into a PA.

    I've also used it to add girth to a Fender Jazz bass for church gigs. I was playing through my wife's Acoustic Image amp, which sounds great with her upright, but is too clean and sterile for electric bass. JB pedal to the rescue, sounds like I'm playing through an old Ampeg fliptop!