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  1. #1

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    I've been going through a lot of picks lately, because I practice a few hours every day, and then gig at night.
    Rather than constantly buy new picks, I've been using sandpaper to make worn out picks pointy again.

    The only problem is a lot of the picks I sand down have a bothersome friction to them when they strike the string. I've tried using an emery board (nail file) to smooth out the sides of the pick, and the point of the pick, but that doesn't always work.
    Does anyone have a foolproof method of rehabilitating these poor, old picks?

  2.  

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  3. #2
    Depending on the material, I’ve had great luck with automotive grade sandpaper of 1000-2000 grit to smooth bevels and some shaping. It’s the same stuff I use on my nails for finger style. I find it at Walmart or Target.


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  4. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by fitflatpicker
    Depending on the material, I’ve had great luck with automotive grade sandpaper of 1000-2000 grit to smooth bevels and some shaping. It’s the same stuff I use on my nails for finger style. I find it at Walmart or Target.


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    Thanks for the reply! Which dept. is that sandpaper in, the automotive or the nail dept?
    The sandpaper I've been using was from Home Depot, and might be too coarse to sand down my Dunlop Jazz IIIs.

  5. #4

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    After sanding, try rubbing the sanded edges vigourously back and forth across some tighly woven or short pile synthetic broadloom.
    Last edited by Hammertone; 06-26-2018 at 11:00 PM.

  6. #5

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    Buy new picks, cheaper than sandpaper.

  7. #6

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    My picks cost $14 per dozen.

    This thing is under $5 and can probably put new life into a pick.

    I've used a similar product with success. I've never seen the exact one in the link. Different sides have different grits. The smoothest one feels completely smooth, but the roughest one feels like sandpaper. Easier to manage than carrying different grades of sandpaper sheets, perhaps.

    Amazon.com: 4 Way Shiny Block / 4 Step Buffing Block Shine Nail Buffer: Health & Personal Care

  8. #7

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    I’ve kept picks in great shape for years using fine sandpaper then some No.7 buffing compound on a leather strop. The compound can be found at any auto parts store, hardware. There is no scratchiness after this process. Some may consider this wasted time but being able to shape your picks to your preferences is an advantage.

  9. #8

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    Somewhere Dan Erlewine is busy making an overpriced Pick filing system now..... lol


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  10. #9

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    I bought a set of these. Use it for picks, frets, and just about anything else on the guitar

    3M Polishing Paper

  11. #10

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    I use sand paper to take the point off...

  12. #11

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    Don't know what you're using but the Dunlop Ultex material is very wear resistant and sounds great.

  13. #12

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    After shaping the pick, I drag it vigorously across a piece of short-pile carpet. Fortunately my practice room has lots of it. It doesn't take a long time, just back and forth a dozen or so times, using some force and moving very quickly, and the edge of the pick is very smooth. Sandpaper, even very fine grades, leaves striations, and the carpet pile takes them out well enough. I often do this with new picks to make sure they're smooth. The only picks I don't use this with are Blue Chips, which don't need it new, and I haven't seen enough wear yet to need reshaping.

  14. #13

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    Blue Chip will not wear out, although most would not go for them

  15. #14

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    Sandpaper to shape your worn pick
    Then, toothpaste to polish it.

    At least it works fine for me with my home-made bone picks

  16. #15
    Thanks for the replies. I'll start out with the carpet, and go from there.

  17. #16

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    Polish it with white jeweler's rouge either on a grinder buffing wheel or dremel buffing attachment.

  18. #17

  19. #18

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    Lots of things can work. It's mostly a matter of deciding how much you want to spend on a gizmo to polish $0.25 picks, and how much time you want to spend doing the polishing. Vigorous strokes across a carpet you already have creates a lot of heat, and gives me an acceptable polish in less than a minute. YMMV.

  20. #19

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    I take my $15 picks to the nail salon for a manicure to restore them.

  21. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hammertone
    After sanding, try rubbing the sanded edges vigourously back and forth across some tighly woven or short pile synthetic broadloom.
    +1
    This is the only thing that helps my picks.

  22. #21

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    Quote Originally Posted by whiskey02
    Don't know what you're using but the Dunlop Ultex material is very wear resistant and sounds great.
    +1

    I'd call them undestroyable, that's why they make them in this "invisible" color, so they hope that you'll lose them at last.

    And the sound!!!


  23. #22

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    So does it work, do you get good results? I use fender mediums, but the package from guitar center, I must literally have hundreds around

  24. #23
    Quote Originally Posted by sgcim
    Thanks for the reply! Which dept. is that sandpaper in, the automotive or the nail dept?
    The sandpaper I've been using was from Home Depot, and might be too coarse to sand down my Dunlop Jazz IIIs.
    Sorry for the delayed response. Just now saw this. It’s in Automotive.


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