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  1. #1

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    The jazz pedal board has always been an interesting topic to me. Jazz guitar is somewhat "plain" in common gig situations, but I seem to find a use for even the most exotic pedals. Anyway, I'm interested to see what others use. If possible, don't post your "normal" pedalboard that you sometimes play jazz through...the reason I wanted to start this thread was to see which effects people are using for their jazz gigs. But hey, I'll never complain about seeing more pedals so post away.

    My current jazz chain: TC Electronics PolyTune > Keeley Compressor > Strymon Lex > TC Electronics Alter Ego (custom delay) > Strymon BlueSky
    Attached Images Attached Images Jazz Focused Guitar Pedal Boards-image-jpg 

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    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #2

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    My jazz pedal board is a 8 x 6 piece of ply with a RC3 looper and a separate stop switch set into a cut-out mouse mat ( if wondering about why a separate stop switch, just try pressing the main pedal twice while timing a stop in tempo )

    I'm intrigued to see what else jazz pedal boards could be….

  4. #3

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    i mostly do not use a pedal board just guitar into the amp

    but i have one for when the gig requires it

    very basic just

    a Boss FDR1 (fender deluxe reverb modeller) for some fenderish tone
    a Boss GE7 , which i just keep there mostly unused but every now and then i find eq a great way to sort out a tone problem
    a Boss RC3 looper and the boss FS6 switch's connected to looper
    a soundcraft mixer which i use as is need either for multiple guitars into my amp or for PA use and line it out to the house system


    Jazz Focused Guitar Pedal Boards-photo1114-jpg

  5. #4

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    I have a medium sized pedalboard I love for the rock and funk stuff I play, but for jazz I just use a Mad Professor Silver Spring reverb pedal into my amp. Or sometimes nothing if I use my Princeton Reverb.

  6. #5
    I play a 5E3- amp and for jazz this could work alone, but I always have a tc hof and a tc flashback before my amp.

    The newest pedal is a mooer black secret, which I find amazing for some modrn sounds. Especialy for soloing this one is nice. I even like the turbo setting more in a jazz context.

  7. #6

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    This is my current pedal board:




    I also have an Electro-Harmonix Holy Grail that I use when I need reverb, a TC Electronic Ditto looper that I sometimes use for practicing, and a Boss FDR-1 that I don't use much anymore.

    I was going to get an Empress Para Eq, but I decided two wait a bit. I might still get one.


    @ Gabe: what is the frame under your pedals? It looks like the perfect size for what I'd need when I use more than just the Hilton volume pedal. Does it have a gig bag or case?

  8. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by Eddie Lang
    This is my current pedal board:




    I also have an Electro-Harmonix Holy Grail that I use when I need reverb, a TC Electronic Ditto looper that I sometimes use for practicing, and a Boss FDR-1 that I don't use much anymore.

    I was going to get an Empress Para Eq, but I decided two wait a bit. I might still get one.


    @ Gabe: what is the frame under your pedals? It looks like the perfect size for what I'd need when I use more than just the Hilton volume pedal. Does it have a gig bag or case?


    I just looked up your Hilton volume pedal......$300 for a volume pedal???? What in the world is so great about that thing?

    I could be wrong but I think the board you asked Gabe about is the PedalTrain Mini. That's what I have in the opening post. It's perfect for just about 5 pedals and comes with a nice gig bag. I know the bigger PedalTrains have hard shell case options but I don't think the mini does.

    Im im also thinking of buying an Empress ParaEQ some day. Anybody have one?
    Last edited by bluewaterpig; 03-22-2014 at 10:30 PM.

  9. #8

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    Those hiltons are the rolls royce of volume pedals. I've used one with my pedal steel for ages. There's no pot, so they last forever.

    K

  10. #9

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    Yep, I have a Hilton for my lap steel. It's an awesome volume pedal.

  11. #10

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    No affiliation, but these guys were across from us at NAMM: http://templeaudio.com/ and I liked the smaller model board.
    I only use a volume (Mission Engineering) and echo pedal, but I'm still looking for a nice overdrive just for a little push when I need it.

  12. #11
    Do they do anything other than control volume? I feel like I'm missing something. I love a good volume pedal...my Ernie Ball volume pedal has lasted for years through 100+ gigs. I'm in shock that a company can sell a volume pedal for $300.



    Quote Originally Posted by nosoyninja
    Those hiltons are the rolls royce of volume pedals. I've used one with my pedal steel for ages. There's no pot, so they last forever.

    K

  13. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by bluewaterpig
    Do they do anything other than control volume? I feel like I'm missing something. I love a good volume pedal...my Ernie Ball volume pedal has lasted for years through 100+ gigs. I'm in shock that a company can sell a volume pedal for $300.
    When I bought mine a few years ago, it didn't cost 300 USD. It has a buffered input and output, so it doesn't suck the tone away. Also since there's no pot, there's no change in EQ when lowering the volume. Also it's built like a tank and has a steady hinge that can be left at it's position even if you lift your foot and land back on it quickly. Mine's been stepped on for ages. All sorts of weird party beverages have landed on it… and it still sounds as hi fi as can be.

    K

  14. #13

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    Ideally if I'm going to use a pedalboard I'll use this pedalboard for everything. I recently decided to step up from a nano sized board to a PTJr. I got tired of changing out pedals on the tiny board every gig so I decided to put something together that would work for pretty much everything.

    Jazz Focused Guitar Pedal Boards-10006938_10203512337147043_402490643_n-jpg

  15. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by bluewaterpig
    I just looked up your Hilton volume pedal......$300 for a volume pedal???? What in the world is so great about that thing?
    What others have said.

    When I was looking around for a volume pedal and wasn't sure what I needed, I asked friends who are guitarists and steel players. My original intension was to get something at $90 to $110, but after speaking with them, I came to the conclusion that:
    1- I really wanted true bypass
    2- I wanted the best possible quality and the most dependable pedal so I'd only spend for one only once, instead of buying and replacing or upgrading.

    I am happy so far and I have not looked back on its price until it was mentioned again here.

  16. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by Eddie Lang
    What others have said.

    When I was looking around for a volume pedal and wasn't sure what I needed, I asked friends who are guitarists and steel players. My original intension was to get something at $90 to $110, but after speaking with them, I came to the conclusion that:
    1- I really wanted true bypass
    2- I wanted the best possible quality and the most dependable pedal so I'd only spend for one only once, instead of buying and replacing or upgrading.

    I am happy so far and I have not looked back on its price until it was mentioned again here.

    Are they true bypass or no? Someone else said they were buffered...

  17. #16

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    One reason I seek advice with friends who know what they're talking about is that I don't know much about electronics and all the talk (ad-copy) about volume pedals (active, non-active, etc.) confused me. -- I am easily confused!

    What I meant is that I was assured that the Hilton pedal would not suck tone and that changing the volume would not change the eq. Now, I always assumed that it is what true bypass means, but it looks that I should make an extra effort to learn the right vocabulary… :/

    Can someone educate me a bit and explain the true meaning of "true bypass"? Thanks!

  18. #17
    There's a ton of info out there on the subject, but in a nutshell, true bypass is a type of circuit that certain pedals are equipped with. If a pedal is true bypass, it means that the pedal has absolutely no effect on your signal when the pedal is off. True bypass isn't a descriptive term...it doesn't mean that the pedal just does a good job of not affecting your tone. A pedal is either true bypass or buffered. Sometimes having buffered pedals can be advantageous depending on your pedal setup. There are tons of arguments and discussions on this subject out there. It'd be a good idea to do some research.

  19. #18

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    Since my rig consists of a digital modeler and models of effects it looks a bit different. This is what I use on almost everything jazz except background gigs etc.

    Jazz Focused Guitar Pedal Boards-pedal-board-jpg

    The signal chain is : Guit - Fulltone Fulldrive - Rat - Temolo - RingMod - Looper - Amp(Twin) - Leslie sim - Delay - Reverb - Volume Pedal.

    I also have an expression on the amount of signal going to the Delay.

    Jens

  20. #19

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    Here's my "pedal board" if you can call it that. K&K definity pickup plus a single coil split into the LRBaggs and the sansamp and each off to a separate channel of my fishman loudbox artist (which powers both pedals with phantom power by the way).

    The Hilton volume pedal is an insert on the sansamp channel only.

    K

    Jazz Focused Guitar Pedal Boards-imageuploadedbytapatalk1395801434-204913-jpg

  21. #20

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    Hi,

    Would welcome any suggestions / critique on my intended pedals for my starter pedal board.

    Guitar: tele with a Lollar Charlie Christian in the neck
    Amp: DV Mark Little Jazz

    Playing:
    - Beginner
    - Only play at home
    - Like to play Jazz-blues (not interested in full-on-blues/rock/metal etc)
    - Favorite players: Grant Green, Kenny Burrell, Jim Hall, Joe Pass


    Currently I have:
    - EHX Nano 360 looper

    Intending to buy in this order:
    - EHX Turnip Greens (for OD and playing around with different reverb in addition to amp reverb)
    - EHX Freeze (for practicing improvising over chords)
    - MXR Carbon Copy (to play around with delay)
    - Boss GE-7 (to play around with EQ)
    - TC Electronic Sentry (to take away hum from Charlie Christian pickup)

    Many thanks, Simon

  22. #21

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    I'd say you've got enough to keep you busy.

    But get a Rat, just for fun.

    BTW, if you're interested in a cheap analog delay, the Donner Yellow Fall is pretty great.

  23. #22

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    Check out the TC Electronic Qintessence harmonizer pedal. Lots of fun.

  24. #23

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    Or just plug into your amp and play? You know, like most jazz guitarists. Depends what kind of jazz you want to play, I guess. Any big influences?

  25. #24

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    It seems you've already got the most useful practice device, which would be the looper. The only effect that you might consider essential is one that very well might be contained within your amplifier: reverb.

  26. #25

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    Have you tried the EHX Soul Food yet with your amp ( the OD in the Turnip Greens)? Overdrives don't always play nice with SS amps.

  27. #26

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    Looks good! Comments on most:
    - With the looper I’m not sure you need the freeze. If it’s just for practice something like the trio might be better.
    - I would get an optical compressor before most of those for tone.
    - Not sure you need EQ with guitar, amp and pedal controls. IME with EQ pedals you get them for a very specific use.
    - I prefer the Boss NS2, ISP Decimator or even the EHX Silencer to the Sentry. Some people swear by TC, I’m not one.
    - Turnip greens is a great idea but I would encourage you to split and get independent OD and reverb in case you want to upgrade/change one and not the other
    - The MXR CC is awesome but it’s an acquired taste. If you know that’s the one you want, perfect. For playing around I would get a delay with multiple modes like the DD7 then you can choose which mode you like best
    - I have a Soul Food and it’s a fine pedal but given your list of people and your amp I would go for an OD that is reminiscent of the tweed sound. Les Lius, Red Llama, Formula 5, Tweed 57. Or you could get a Tech21 Blonde (or Joyo American) and use it as an OD.
    - Also think about how you’ll power this. The reverb, freeze and looper will likely need isolated power and maybe also the delay depending on which on you pick.

    Have fun!



    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro

  28. #27

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    My most used pedal is an overdrive pedal, often used at a low level where you can't hear an obvious overdrive sound. The overdrive is almost always on. My other pedals, almost always not on. Even on for chord playing, makes my Quilter (solid state) sound more tubey:


  29. #28

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    I've had little success with OD in front of my Little Jazz - the bass always becomes very flubby - but you may have better luck by playing close atttention to the tone control on the D pedal and the lows on the Little Jazz. As I have other amps for OD sounds, I may have given up too soon on the LJ. However, the Joyo American with low gain certainly gives it a different character, most probably by reducing the mids in a way that the mid control on the Little Jazz, on its own, cannot.

    Good luck !

  30. #29

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    The problem with pedals is that you can spend too much time fiddling with the pedals and simultaneously avoiding practice!
    Also, shopping for the "perfect" pedal set up is an endless task. I got into pedals a couple of years ago and wasted a fair amount of money and time on a bunch of stuff I rarely use. I mean I know that playing with some delay and fuzz can be lots of fun and all, but I'd put more energy into learning stuff on tele into the Little Jazz.

    Personally, I play more acoustic than electric so that's an even more bare-bones approach.

  31. #30

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    Yeah, fiddling with pedals, along with too much time on a particular guitar forum ran from somewhere in Belgium, can be a distraction from practice.

  32. #31

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    Favorite players: Grant Green, Kenny Burrell, Jim Hall, Joe Pass


    Don't need a pedal board. Get a good amp and plug straight in. The Little Jazz will probably be fine.

    What I play pedals wise for a modern/contemp/fusion gig, fairly small set up as far as it goes...

    Fender Tele/Gibson 175 or whatever....

    Jim Dunlop mini volume pedal
    Ibanez tubescreamer (old 90s plastic one that no-one likes.)
    Boss OC3 (great pedal)
    EHX Freeze (very cool but I need to swap out the switch at some point cos it's really noisy)
    TC Electronic Ditto Looper
    MXR Carbon Copy (yes this is a good pedal)

    Probably the next addition will be a clean boost.



  33. #32

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    So, nice tele, nice amp, likes Jim Hall, et al., has a looper to practice …. you need nothing else unless your new influences are Rosenwinkel, Moreno, Hekselman, et al.!!

    Just play, have fun, and find some local guys to play with!

  34. #33

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    IMO, the worst thing a beginning player can do is get caught up in the effects/pedalboard game. Learn to play and get a good sound with just your guitar and amp first.

  35. #34

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    Rob MacKillop, simplified this, none of the
    greats used pedals, JP, JR, TF, BK ,Wes etc
    as far as I’m aware. A good quality amp
    Mambo, Henriksen , Evans,Fender , Polytone
    paired with a good Archtop is quite adequate
    for straight ahead Jazz /,Standards.

  36. #35

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    Well Jim Hall did use a Whammy Pedal IIRC later in his career.

  37. #36

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    Can't agree there. I consider Scofield, Hall, Monder, Frisell, Kriesberg, Adam Rogers, Pat Martino and Pat Metheny "the greats" and they all used effects.

    But I agree that you should learn to play some before adding effects.

    Quote Originally Posted by silverfoxx
    Rob MacKillop, simplified this, none of the
    greats used pedals, JP, JR, TF, BK ,Wes etc
    as far as I’m aware. A good quality amp
    Mambo, Henriksen , Evans,Fender , Polytone
    paired with a good Archtop is quite adequate
    for straight ahead Jazz /,Standards.

  38. #37

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    Even Joe Pass used a wah pedal on a record though it wasn't done very well...

  39. #38

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    I agree fundamentally with Rob, but it also depends on the style you wish you develop. If the style heavily makes use of pedals, then they are part of the instrument and require practice. For example, using a freeze pedal to sustain, or a sampler to loop, or a cv controlled tremolo pedal for texture— these all require practice to incorporate them in your style. However, if you’re just getting started and/or your goal is to play straight jazz, then you probably don’t need them yet or ever. There’s a lot of stuff to practice that you will be distracted from if you dive straight in to pedals.

    The looper was a good choice, though.

  40. #39

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    And the tc sentry won’t remove your hum. You want an EHX Hum Debugger for that.

  41. #40

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    Many thanks for all your replies, they are appreciated.

    I have been (in the nicest possible way) bought back done to Earth and told for the most part, forget the distractions (pedals/books/forums et. al.) and practice. Thank you all for that. I think I probably needed to hear it (although I do recall my wife previously mentioning something similar about guitar books arriving from Amazon...).

    So, no pedals for a year and then reassess.... (and check jazzguitar.be forums only once per-week to avoid various guitar related acquisition syndromes).

    Cheers, Si

  42. #41

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    Quote Originally Posted by jockster
    Many thanks for all your replies, they are appreciated.

    I have been (in the nicest possible way) bought back done to Earth and told for the most part, forget the distractions (pedals/books/forums et. al.) and practice. Thank you all for that. I think I probably needed to hear it (although I do recall my wife previously mentioning something similar about guitar books arriving from Amazon...).

    So, no pedals for a year and then reassess.... (and check jazzguitar.be forums only once per-week to avoid various guitar related acquisition syndromes).

    Cheers, Si
    Focusing on practice is a good idea. Neglecting the single greatest source of jazz lore and instruction on the planet might merit a little more thought. Lessons, theory discussions, tips, tales, video performances, evidence anecdotal and otherwise, blue sky thinking, aspirational inspiration - jazzguitar.be has it all - for free! Keep the baby. Recycle the bathwater.

  43. #42

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    To be fair to myself, my comment was two-fold. Many jazz greats played without effects, which is why I suggest just plug and play. But I did go on to ask Simon what style he would like to play, who he listens to. If, in that case, he was a big fan of effects-laden music, then that's a world I know precious little about - so he should ignore my comment. But I see he's taking on board lots of comments here.

  44. #43

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    Quote Originally Posted by jockster
    Many thanks for all your replies, they are appreciated.

    I have been (in the nicest possible way) bought back done to Earth and told for the most part, forget the distractions (pedals/books/forums et. al.) and practice. Thank you all for that. I think I probably needed to hear it (although I do recall my wife previously mentioning something similar about guitar books arriving from Amazon...).

    So, no pedals for a year and then reassess.... (and check jazzguitar.be forums only once per-week to avoid various guitar related acquisition syndromes).

    Cheers, Si
    Well... you can obviously do that. IMHO a healthy balance is always good. Sometimes I’ve had gear curiosity help me pick up the guitar or play 30 more minutes. Eg how would it sound if I played that song with delay?

    Same for lessons.

  45. #44

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    Don't necessarily be too quick to swear off getting any pedals. I think that getting a tuning pedal can be a smart move for a beginner. Also, something like a Zoom ms-70C cdr can be fun to have just to play around with. There is serious practice, and there is just noodling in front of the tv or whatever, so why not explore some new tones when doing the latter via a cheap but decent multi-effects unit? Whatever you decide to do, good luck with your studies.

  46. #45

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    If there's a part of you that's drawn to effects, then maybe you could invest a modest amount for something like this:

    Zoom G1on FX Processor at Gear4music.com

    - loads of built in effects, so you can try all the different types, and experiment with different combinations. As long as it doesn't become too big a distraction from practicing, I don't see why not. I do use effects with some bands I'm in - in the right context, they can be great, and it's good to know about these things.

  47. #46

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    My view of pedals may be a little different, but I'm not sure about that.

    I think the issue is finding your own voice. It's the sound of the guitar that most closely produces the sounds in your mind and allows you to express yourself most effectively.

    For some, that's an archtop straight into an amp.

    For others, it's something else.

    And, it may take a player years to find that voice, to evolve to it.

    If you were talking about how to play in a Beatles Tribute band, then perhaps someone could advise you on ways to create those specific sounds. But, how can anybody advise you on finding your own voice? So, people advise on how to create sounds commonly used by players who are widely acknowledged to be great.

    I use a Boss ME80 (and the 70 and 50 before that). It has all the usual stuff, including one thing you didn't mention but which I use constantly -- the volume pedal. In group situations I play with my foot on it.

    A few years ago, I spent an afternoon with my pedalboard searching for sounds, eventually creating a clean sound and three processed sounds. Those are the sounds I use. I picked them because they contribute to what I see as my sound.

    Other people might not hear much that's special, but that's not the real issue. For me, it's getting the sound in my mind to come out of the speaker.

  48. #47

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    Looper pedal is super useful for quality practice, you go the right one!

  49. #48

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    Quote Originally Posted by christianm77
    Well Jim Hall did use a Whammy Pedal IIRC later in his career.
    Yeah, very few people knew about Hall's metal/shred period, after he found out he could sell more records by using a chorus pedal and jamming with Frisell and Metheny.
    He went out and bought a wig that gave him shoulder length hair, and started sitting in at CBGBs.
    Before you knew it, he had a pedal board consisting of:

    A Brain Annihilator 2
    An Earth Scorcher 7
    A Trump Planet Destroyer
    and of course, a Boss Metal Zone.

    Things finally came to a head when he started getting into a G.G. Allin thing at Coachella, and had to be escorted offstage, after violating their rules concerning the use of bodily fluids on stage.

    Who would've believed that this all started with a little experimentation with chorus pedal?

  50. #49

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  51. #50

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    Looks like you've done your research. Don't listen to those who say you shouldn't get an OD pedal. If you're a beginner electric guitar player and your amp doesn't have a built in gain, you get an OD pedal not because "you need it" but because it's crazy not to have one A well matched OD pedal can do wonders to the sound of a solid state amp. Even if high gain settings wouldn't be as useful for the style of music you're going for, every now and then you'll want to play rock riffs or David Gilmour solos and what not. Not to mention the contribution light OD can make to hard-bop guitar.
    I would bring the amp to the guitar store (unless they already carry that model of course) and try the pedals on that amp. Soul food might work well though, it adds a natural tubey sweetness by boosting lower mids and compresses the bass a bit so the amp doesn't get fuzzy.
    Never used a freeze pedal, seems redundant since you have a looper (most important music gear after metronome). Also you don't want to get used to be spoon fed the chord tones by a freeze pedal, you want to pick them up from comped chords.
    Others you can probably do without at this stage.