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  1. #1

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    Hi All,

    I have the jack to stay in the $500-$1500 range for an archtop guitar. I was hell bent on getting a D'Angelico but don't belive I'll get much more than any of the $700 dollar guitars available. I like the looks of the Epiphone Emperor. If you have one, how long have you owned it, do you like it? Thanks

    Dave
    GOD, Family, carreer

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  3. #2

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    Sheesh, Dave, look down about two posts ! More than you ever wanted to know

  4. #3

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    Yea, I see the thread about the total diss of the Regent, that's not what I asked for. The starter of the thread gave us lots of good usefull knowledge indeed and from there the discussion is pretty much about construction, Japan, Korea, China etc.
    GOD, Family, carreer

  5. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dave_E View Post
    Yea, I see the thread about the total diss of the Regent, that's not what I asked for. The starter of the thread gave us lots of good usefull knowledge indeed and from there the discussion is pretty much about construction, Japan, Korea, China etc.
    Fair enough.

    I started that thread and to answer your specific initial questions, I've owned the guitar for about five years and never been happy with it. It became a wall hanger less than a month after I acquired it.

    cheers

  6. #5

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    I still defend the Regent. for 500$ used it smokes the competition. Godin Kingpin is a great guitar for the money but you are comparing apples and elephants.

    No structural issues at all. Mine is a 99 Peerless model. No fretwork needed. The nut was cut badly but that worked itself out when I switched to 14s. replaced the forks on the tailpiece with .. well.. different homemade forks. no impact on sound/playability but I dont have to worry about D strings fitting properly.

    Replaced the bridge with a StewMac ebony. It is worth it.
    Removed the pickguard. This improved the acoustic sound (to me anyway).

    These are NOT great guitars unplugged but you get what you pay for. I am not married to the guitar. I wil sell it to get something better when I have the cash/talent to justify it. Having said that, show me another 17 archtop with a floating pickup and a cutaway that goes for 500$ on ebay?
    Aside from Aria's I cant think of any (and I didnt see any of them on ebay in the months I was shopping).

  7. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by dh82c View Post
    I still defend the Regent. for 500$ used it smokes the competition. Godin Kingpin is a great guitar for the money but you are comparing apples and elephants.

    No structural issues at all. Mine is a 99 Peerless model. No fretwork needed. The nut was cut badly but that worked itself out when I switched to 14s. replaced the forks on the tailpiece with .. well.. different homemade forks. no impact on sound/playability but I dont have to worry about D strings fitting properly.

    Replaced the bridge with a StewMac ebony. It is worth it.
    Removed the pickguard. This improved the acoustic sound (to me anyway).

    These are NOT great guitars unplugged but you get what you pay for. I am not married to the guitar. I wil sell it to get something better when I have the cash/talent to justify it. Having said that, show me another 17 archtop with a floating pickup and a cutaway that goes for 500$ on ebay?
    Aside from Aria's I cant think of any (and I didnt see any of them on ebay in the months I was shopping).
    DH, you and I are fairly committed to our beliefs and obviously willing to defend them. From one aspect, that's a good thing, one SHOULD be prepared to defend something that is important.

    On the other hand, we're arguing from a statistically meaningless sample of one. And we're coming from viewpoints that are years apart (referring to difference in age).

    And the topic may not really be worth arguing about, so let's call it a debate. Sorry for introducing the word "argument" into this topic, definitely my bad.

    Anyway, if you don't object, I'll debate some of the points that you made, OK?

    I still defend the Regent. for 500$ used it smokes the competition

    At this price range, there isn't much, in the way of quality, to compete with - it's ALL Chinese, probably all made in the same chain of factories (I won't get into the factory worker thing). Your statement doesn't really mean that much until you qualify it with standards of measurement, quality, performance, reliability, factory support, and so forth. Others may choose to apply different standards than you use.

    No structural issues at all.

    Your implication is that there ARE structural issues with other guitars. Perhaps that's applicable to the instruments in the price range that you mentioned but it really shouldn't be. Unless we are applying different definitions to the term, then I have to infer - by your statement - that there ARE problems with the structure of the instrument: design, materials, workmanship, experience.

    Mine is a 99 Peerless model. No fretwork needed.

    Why would any fretwork be needed ?

    The nut was cut badly but that worked itself out when I switched to 14s.

    Wouldn't that be a structural (workmanship) issue ?

    replaced the forks on the tailpiece with .. well.. different homemade forks. no impact on sound/playability but I dont have to worry about D strings fitting properly.

    Got that, your replacement looks good ! I think that you mentioned a week or so back that your tailpiece was better proportioned and I agree. Apparently the factory didn't, though.

    Replaced the bridge with a StewMac ebony. It is worth it.

    Why is it worth it ? In another post you alluded to Epiphone not "cutting corners" by furnishing the bridge that came with the guitar. I assumed that you meant that the original bridge was acceptable, from a quality/performance standpoint, did I get it wrong ?

    Removed the pickguard. This improved the acoustic sound (to me anyway).

    Sounds good to me, your playing technique certainly would enhance the utility of the instrument by this modification.

    Also, I think that your Epi looks GREAT, you did a fine job of improving what you had to work with. I just wonder why you had to do all of that if the guitar was of reasonable quality to start with ...

    Having said that, show me another 17 archtop with a floating pickup and a cutaway that goes for 500$ on ebay?

    What is the point ? Definitions, standards need to be applied to a statement like that. Your implication is that "17 (inch) archtop" and "floating pickup" and "cutaway" are important considerations of value (however one defines value) of the instrument.

    Perhaps those are important considerations to you but I suggest that they are not to others unless accompanied by other "values" commensurate with the traditional ones that we've learned to respect and love for, oh a hundred years or so. Sound, playability, re-sale value, inspiration (that's a BIGGIE for me), history and <ahem> braggability - sorry, crass, vulgar stuff

    No disrespect intended for your opinions, after all we're talking about stuff that isn't easily definable so my opinions have no more intrinsic value than yours. So what's the bottom line ? I think that you put it real well when you said:

    These are NOT great guitars unplugged but you get what you pay for. I am not married to the guitar. I wil sell it to get something better when I have the cash/talent to justify it.

    to which I would add: they're not so great when they're plugged in, either !

    Cheers,
    RandyC

  8. #7

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    Mine's a 2007 MIK. Owning the Epiphone Emperor Regent has made me internationally famous - well, as far as 'that other thread' is concerned it has, and there really is plenty of advice in that other thread if you look for it. I more or less agree with dh82c here: if you're after a 17", accoustic sytle guitar, with floater and for around the price range - what is there? Accoustically it's a fuller sound than the Godin, but again they are different beasts. My plugged-in sound significantly improved with even the MIK Kent Armstong, and improved again (but to a lesser extent) when I installed the 57 Classic. I like it, especially for accoustic noodling, and it's here to stay while there's room for it and the rest of the brood. It's nearest competitor, not so easy to find, is the Aria FA71. If you can, look that out too. It has a better accoustic sound, and maybe the manufacture of it is more consistent - it seems to me that the production of Epis travels around more factories than Aria (but I might be wrong about that). The guys have taught me that most of the fiddling I have done with the Emperor has less to do with the Emperor's shortcomings and more to do with my need for a motorcycle substitute. Find one and play one if you can and that will say more than I can about it, but try to find the Aria too.

  9. #8

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    Add a vote for the Aria FA71. At $5-600 it's an excellent performer. I know of one available in a New Jersey shop. It is about the same as mine shown here.

  10. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by RoyaleT View Post
    Add a vote for the Aria FA71. At $5-600 it's an excellent performer. I know of one available in a New Jersey shop. It is about the same as mine shown here.
    Fine photograph there RoyaleT, of a 17" jazz box and in its natural environment. All too often you only see beats like this in captivity (dealers windows and internet sites).

  11. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dave_E View Post
    " I have the jack to stay in the $500-$1500 range for an archtop guitar "

    Dave, et al,

    Please forgive my repetition (other threads), and yes, obsession with Guilds, or any good value American made guitar (And I write this only since you are posting that your upper price range is in the $1,500 range)

    However, I can't help but chime in and suggest that you might want to re-evaluate your purchasing decision. I too, at first, looked at Epiphone or other budget archtop guitars. If I may, I'd like to share my experience with this particular Indonesian made specimen.

    I bought the Epiphone ES-175 copy. Although the eye candy looked right from the typical heavy polyurethane overcoat that one sees in this genre of Asian imports, it was in short order that flaws croped up. Initially, it sounded and looked fine, but upon further scrutiny, I wasn't pleased with it's construction. In particular, the laminated (it looked liked luan) sides were extremely thin - so thin, in fact the jack hole developed cracks in the wood from simple tugging of the cord. I installed a jackplate to stabilize that area. I also noticed the top coat cracking on the set of the neck (following the joint) - this alarmed me since this might be unsusual settling of the glue/wood in that joint. In my mind, this shouldn't happen after a month. I ultimately sold this Epiphone.

    So, were is this leading up to? After selling the Epi ES-175 I rethought what I was looking for in an archtop guitar. Mind you, I wasn't looking for an acoustic archtop with a floating pickup and if one is compelled to buy an elctric acoustic archtop in the price range our friend had written, then indeed an Asian import may be the only candidate. As I like the amplified sound of an archtop, I felt that the compromise of gaping holes cut out on the soundboard for all that electronic stuff outweighed my need for a purer acoustic sound (look at the Guild solid carved soundboard X-700 model for instance).

    I had purchased a couple of Guilds in the late seventies - an acoustic and an electric archtop (F-48 & SF-II). I always remember, with fondness, the great workmanship, sound and value of those Guilds - even for that era. My re-thinking was, in part, motivated by emotional recollections, but in good part to the value of those American crafted instruments.

    As many of you have done, researching prices for new archtops that are/were domesticly made was intimidating at best. Gibson has a respected and long standing tradition in developing and continuing the standards for what we expect out of archtops. However, the price for new, or used quickly eroded any hopes for me to purchase one in my budget. My budget was in your upper end of the price range; $1,000 - $2000.

    I quickly found that Guilds, even though American made, having an outstanding reputation in quality and respected by professional players, was extremely undervalued! Unfortunately, Guild is no longer producing archtops since being acquired by Fender. They moved the archtop production to Corona, CA and crafted them until 2005. This meant used specimens were only available. However, if you are looking for mint condition guitars, this entirely possible. (Yes, Fender's custom shop in Nashville still make the high end Benedetto archtop models, though the price range is stratospheric!)

    I am entirely pleased with all my recent Guild purchases. They don't have the same re-sale value as a Gibson, but they will hold up much better than any Asian import (this is based on my experience with the resale of the Epi ES-175). But most important of all, I'm delighted that these instruments will last throughout my playing years and will still be playable and yes, still have a good resale value in years to come. Did I mention that they sound awesome too?

    I thank all of you for reading my personal thoughts and ideas in this subject. I realize that many of your opinions may be shared or differ from mine and welcome your agreements or rebutals.

    PS: I swear that I'm not affiliated with this bloke, but if my argument has swayed your decision, you gota look at this Guild for a classic jazz box!

    1979 Guild X 175 Blonde - eBay (item 270465554079 end time Oct-11-09 17:24:41 PDT)

    Ok, there's 1 bid already. Maybe it won't be in your price range ...

    One more thing. After posting, I should add; I see the Heritage brand similair in value to the Guilds for American made instruments. I can't add my opinion since I don't own one. However, it was/is certainly in my radar!
    Last edited by X-500; 10-11-2009 at 01:00 PM.
    Alex R.

    Guild: X-700, X-500, X-170, X-150
    Fender: Roadhouse Stratocaster (1997)
    Kay: K-11
    Epiphone: Joe Pass Emperor-II

  12. #11

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    Alex, you're a fine advocate for Guild and I agree with everything that you say about them. Had more than the one SF-III come my way over the years, no doubt I would now have a Gibson/Guild collection, instead of one that is mostly Gibson !

    In past notes, I should have mentioned Alex' points as well. Old Guild guitars are seriously high-quality products for very little money. That is bound to change so if there's an opportunity for you to acquire one, I'd jump on it. I'm referring to the guitars made in Westerly, Rhode Island.

    I have a short-sighted tendancy to look for a flaw in an argument, get it in my teeth and talk it to death. My apologies, I should have been more constructive in my soapbox oratory, offering positive alternatives instead of simply criticizing a product that I personally don't enjoy.

    Thanks, Alex, for getting things back on track after my diversion.

    RandyC

    PS: I also apologize for the mixed metaphors
    Last edited by randyc; 10-11-2009 at 12:48 PM. Reason: add PS

  13. #12

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    Let me post some pictures to illustrate my position in this debate (some of you, Randy and RAQ, already are aware of how I feel).

    First, here are a pair of Precision basses.


    These are, first, a Squier II Precision, made in Indonesia, I bought for $125. I installed a Basslines Quarter Pound in it, and replaced the warped neck with a used Warmoth.

    The second is a new (just got it a couple of weeks ago) Fender American Vintage '57 Precision that I paid $1622 for, with tax (yeah, I could have got it online for $1500, no tax and free shipping, but I like to support my local dealer).

    Here's another pair:


    First (or third, if you're counting) is a '95 Epiphone Sheraton II; last is a 2000 Gibson ES-335 Dot.

    The cheapos are just as good as the high-priced spread...right?

    Hell no. The Squier has a plywood body, a cheap looking pearlescent white finish, and weighs as much as my Toyota. OK, it sounds like a Precision (I bought it after years of Jazz Bass playing to test the water), but in every other way, including the feel of the neck (I'm speaking of the original),the evenness of the frets, the lack of friction of the controls, the real Fender is far superior. Ah, you say, but the Squier was $200, and the Fender was eight times that. Yes, I reply, but the Squier was overpriced, and I got the Fender for a bargain price.

    On to the semi-acoustics: I paid $200 in cash for the Epi (it was part of a large horse trade), put another $150 in Seymour Duncan pickups, speed knobs, new pots, creme pickup rings and whatnot. The 335 cost me $1750. Both came with hard cases.

    Let's repeat our test: this time, the Gibson cost about five times what the Epiphone did. But the 335 has nitrocellulose lacquer instead of the gloppy plastic on the Sheraton, is made of much nicer wood, has higher quality hardware, and, oh yeah, sounded better out to the box than the Epi ever did, even after the organ transplant.

    Here are two more reasons: I could not bond with either the Squier or Epiphone. They were too plainly built to a price point, and many subtle things that I love about the other two were absent, because they cost too much to implement, with the result that the all-important feel was not there; and both were, when I sold them, worth roughly what I spent before I started modifying them (I am including the value of trade-ins on the Sheraton).

    So here's my conclusion. The purchase of the Squier and the Epiphone were zero-sum transactions, at best. On the other hand, the purchase of the Fender and the Gibson were deals that improved my environment, my playing, and -- for someone my age, this is important -- the value my grown children will derive from them after my death. I imagine them going through my effects and saying, oh god, another Goodwill special! every time they open a case and find an Epiphone (no longer possible, by the way).

    X-500, a friend is a Guild fan of equal standing to yours, but he concentrates on flat tops. He and I went through an illustrated history of Guild together, and it turned out that there were very few acoustics in there that he hadn't owned at one time or another. Excellent guitars.
    "Digo: 'paciencia, y barajar.'" -- Don Quijote de la Mancha, Part II, Chapter 23

  14. #13

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    Ok. I think this is beaten to death. Arguing on the internet is like running in the special olympics. Even if you win, you are still retarded. There.. I said it. Ban me, flame me, call my parents if you want.

    Now, what was the original question? How is my Epi holding up?
    Just fine thank you. Not a helpful answer but I dont dare expand on that.

    There are at least a couple of other posters who can answer you on this.
    Hopefully they will be able to answer your question.

  15. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by dh82c View Post
    Ok. I think this is beaten to death. Arguing on the internet is like running in the special olympics. Even if you win, you are still retarded.
    LMAO !!!! Too true !

  16. #15

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    I hate it when I'm outed.
    "Digo: 'paciencia, y barajar.'" -- Don Quijote de la Mancha, Part II, Chapter 23

  17. #16

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    My sympathies are spread across a number of views here so it's almost impossible to reply now without getting myself into a dreadful tangle, but I'll try for 'Dave E's sake.

    I've been mooching around the web sites looking at the Ibanez AK series. I've tried the Epi ES175 and agree with 'X-500'. I had to carry out exactly the same mod of putting a plate at the jack point to limit cracking. The ES175 is OK - up to a point. I'm not really a fan of the Ibanez styling, but the AK series looked promising. The AK80 is around 340 (UK Pounds); the AK100 is around 540 and the Gibson ES175 is around 2500. There's no doubt which is the best is there? If I had the money, and my playing could justify it, I'd have the Gibby. Could I find the money if I made the effort - possibly. Could I really justify the money given my ability - probably not. What the AK series does is give me the chance to experience a 175 style guitar without feeling all that guilt. What I would like, and what is sensible for me at this present moment, are two different things. Lets just suppose that, for someone in my position, 2500 just can't be justified for sensible economic reasons. Doesn't matter how good it is, it might just as well be 25000. That leaves me with the AK 80 or the AK 100. Out of those two the AK100 is much more responsive, so much so that it would be pointless trying to save 200 on the AK80.

    I think what I'm trying to say is that buying wisely is itself relative - it doesn't mean I have to lash out on the best guitar I can lay my hands on, it means buying the best I can sensibly afford. In this case it means I'm going to think about it a bit longer. However - it can't be, can it, that folks can only take up the guitar if they're willing to buy the best there is; all they have to do is buy the best they can afford, or justify. If your budget goes from 500 - 1500 that would suggest you allow yourself to spend the 1500. As in the case of the AK's - why buy the 80 when you can perfectly afford the 100. That would be a waste of money. It sounds from your post that you think the 1500 range is no better than the 700 range - and that the now infamous Emperor is around 700. I still reckon that the Epi is OK, but the Aria FA71 is better if you can find one. Allowing for the odd exception (buyer beware) I think Epi, Ibanez and Aria are all reliable enough. There are worse guitars about. I don't suppose this helps you much - mostly because I'm not in a position to judge those guitars that might fall closer to your 1500 limit.

    PS: and on a related issue - the first electric guitar I bought was an Epi Standard Les Paul, which I have since modded with Gibson parts. Following the on-going discussion about guitar quality, it is the one guitar I have at the moment that I feel I should upgrade to Gibson. It cost me 399 (plus gradual mods). The Gibson Standard LP at the moment is around 1700. I would never have ventured into electric guitars if someone told me I had to spend 1700 to do it. The Epi has convinced me I ought to have a LP, and now that means making the effort to make it a Gibson - but it's only the 399 Epi that has taught me this. If you want a 17" archtop, or think you do, and haven't quite got the confidence, or funds, to justify spending 5000; a 700 Epi/FA71 might give you the time to make your mind up and allow you to save for the next step. But - if you find you are ready to step up, make that step a big one like lpdeluxe says ... which is why I'm going to have to start finding the money for a Gibson LP. But I still don't see why the first step has to be the best there is.

    If all that makes any sense at all, I shall be pleasantly surprised.
    Last edited by RAQ; 10-12-2009 at 04:51 AM.

  18. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by RAQ View Post
    I would never have ventured into electric guitars if someone told me I had to spend 1700 to do it. The Epi has convinced me I ought to have a LP, and now that means making the effort to make it a Gibson - but it's only the 399 Epi that has taught me this.
    That's a large part of my point: not that, my guitar is better than yours, but that, once you get a taste, a sip is not enough -- you want a meal. Looking over the gear I've owned, I started with a guitar for which I paid $35, progressing up into three figures (!) and now, beyond. The lesson I learned has nothing to do with where a person may have started; but I firmly believe that experience (and, one hopes, enhanced musical taste and abilities) will lead one, not to a large collection of Epiphones and Samicks, say, but to a perhaps smaller herd of better instruments.

    And, of course, if you showed up with your Epiphone and blew me quite out of the water with your playing, the last thing I would criticize would be your choice of weapons -- although, depending on the depth of our friendship, I might well counsel you to get something more commensurate with your talents.

    I advocate better guitars because I know from my experience that a better tool allows you to do better work. Performance subtleties I take for granted on Gibsons (my preference) can be difficult on a less expensive guitar that may not stay in tune so well, or intonate so precisely, or have a neck or whatever allowing superior technique. There isn't a standard calibration that says, if one is at a certain level, one should own a particular guitar, but I'm a firm believer that tools should not limit where you go. From where I sit, that implies getting an instrument better than I am.

    When my stepson was a classical guitar student, he went from an inexpensive Yamaha nylon-string to a custom-made guitar. He was amazed at his sudden facility in applying technique that had eluded him previously.
    "Digo: 'paciencia, y barajar.'" -- Don Quijote de la Mancha, Part II, Chapter 23

  19. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by RAQ View Post
    If all that makes any sense at all, I shall be pleasantly surprised.
    I've already committed myself (my entire adult life) to the other side of the debate, soooo ... But your post was articulate, eloquent, had a good beat and I could dance to it.

    Well done, sincerely, RAQ.

    (I don't know if the above "humor" travels well, it came from an old 1950-1960 U.S. aired rock and roll daily TV series, "American Bandstand".)

  20. #19
    Ive own the epiphone regent, and I prefer Ibanez over epiphones myself .

  21. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by lpdeluxe View Post
    I advocate better guitars because I know from my experience that a better tool allows you to do better work. Performance subtleties I take for granted on Gibsons (my preference) can be difficult on a less expensive guitar that may not stay in tune so well, or intonate so precisely, or have a neck or whatever allowing superior technique. There isn't a standard calibration that says, if one is at a certain level, one should own a particular guitar, but I'm a firm believer that tools should not limit where you go. From where I sit, that implies getting an instrument better than I am.
    I think the reason I'm confused is that I agree with both sides of the discussion - anyway, I agree with what you say here, and even more so with your point about refining the herd to a small number of good instruments rather than just accumulating budget models. I suppose what's bothering me is that I'm begining to wonder if what I'm doing is accumulating rather than selecting. I've got an American Tele (after being converted by Mr B. and Ted Greene), but a Mexican Strat; because I see the Tele as a longterm project, but just wanted to see what a Strat felt and played like. I was hoping I was maintaining this sense of balance throughout, but maybe I'm not. Perhaps I have reached the stage where my judgements about guitars are beginning to solidify into some sort of discernment - which is why all this discussion has become so interesting to me. Either way - I still think the Epi/Aria is a good place to start, if starting is what you're doing.

  22. #21

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    I have the Epiphone broadway, an emperor with humbuckers.
    Before buying it, I have tried a lot of guitars below 1000 euros. Ibanez, Peerless, Godin, ...
    I like the comfort for a big jazzbox and the sound.
    I don't like the cheap finishing and the pickup.

  23. #22

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    Quote Originally Posted by gary mitchell View Post
    Ive own the epiphone regent, and I prefer Ibanez over epiphones myself .
    I like the more 'Gibson' looks of the Epis, and althought here seems to be a great variety of Ibanez archtops they really only boil down to an L5-like AF or a 175-like AK; there's not, as far as I know, a 17" floater - which is where the Aria comes in as an alternative to the Emperor. The upper end of the Artcore series though are better (more responsive) IMO than the Epis. The 'Joe Pass' and the 'ES175' tend to contain the sound of the strings (for example), whereas the 'PM35' and 'AK100' seem to enhance it. The Epis to me seem to be more equivalent to the '75's and '85's in the Ibanez range; but then the prices reflect this.

    AS intersting as all these discussions are in the 'gear' threads you'll have to excuse me, because time I went and actually tried to play one of the damn things.

  24. #23

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    Quote Originally Posted by randyc View Post
    I've already committed myself (my entire adult life) to the other side of the debate, soooo ... But your post was articulate, eloquent, had a good beat and I could dance to it.

    Well done, sincerely, RAQ.

    (I don't know if the above "humor" travels well, it came from an old 1950-1960 U.S. aired rock and roll daily TV series, "American Bandstand".)

    Hi - I didn't want you to think I was leaving you out. If I may borrow a transatlantic expression - it's cool (I think that's right). We have an old expression 'you sing a good tune' which I think expresses the same sort of idea. Either way I'm taking it as a compliment.

  25. #24

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    Quote Originally Posted by nado64 View Post
    I have the Epiphone broadway, an emperor with humbuckers.
    Before buying it, I have tried a lot of guitars below 1000 euros. Ibanez, Peerless, Godin, ...
    I like the comfort for a big jazzbox and the sound.
    I don't like the cheap finishing and the pickup.
    While I'm replying to everyone - I see you're in Toulouse. I spent an afternoon there once, in a cafe, enjoying the Sun and listening to the music. I love France - if you're in Toulouse it doesn't matter what you play. But you can always change the pickups. There's a good Youtube video of the Broadway - I'll see if I can find a link:
    Last edited by RAQ; 10-12-2009 at 03:43 AM. Reason: video link

  26. #25

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    Yes, I love Toulouse, too. It's a city "où il fait bon vivre" (where is good to live).

    For my pickup, I've replaced it by a vintage vibe guitar, a charlie christian humbucker and I put a vitamin Q capacitor. The difference is very important with the original epiphone.

  27. #26

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    Quote Originally Posted by RAQ View Post
    I think the reason I'm confused is that I agree with both sides of the discussion - anyway, I agree with what you say here, and even more so with your point about refining the herd to a small number of good instruments rather than just accumulating budget models. I suppose what's bothering me is that I'm begining to wonder if what I'm doing is accumulating rather than selecting. I've got an American Tele (after being converted by Mr B. and Ted Greene), but a Mexican Strat; because I see the Tele as a longterm project, but just wanted to see what a Strat felt and played like. I was hoping I was maintaining this sense of balance throughout, but maybe I'm not. Perhaps I have reached the stage where my judgements about guitars are beginning to solidify into some sort of discernment - which is why all this discussion has become so interesting to me. Either way - I still think the Epi/Aria is a good place to start, if starting is what you're doing.
    I went through that whole process on electric bass in recent years: I had never been more than a substitute bass player, on those occasions when the **real** bassist wanted to scare everyone on guitar. When I got a full-time bass gig, I started from scratch. I had a clunker, then a bling-machine, then an actual good bass, and then I discovered Fender Precisions. Had I bought the P first, I would have saved a bit of money -- but I don't know that I'd have had so much fun, soldering and whacking and "fettling."
    "Digo: 'paciencia, y barajar.'" -- Don Quijote de la Mancha, Part II, Chapter 23

  28. #27

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    For many years I played bass much more than I played guitar. I'm fussy about guitars, but when it comes to bass, I go for the Red Green model: many of mine were held together with duct tape.

  29. #28

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    Quote Originally Posted by Archie View Post
    For many years I played bass much more than I played guitar. I'm fussy about guitars, but when it comes to bass, I go for the Red Green model: many of mine were held together with duct tape.
    I am surprised that Red Greene has made it all the way to Slovenia.

    Keep your stick on the ice

  30. #29

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    Red Green is everywhere: "If women don't find you handsome, they should at least find you handy.

  31. #30

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    Are you searching the internet because you're thinking of buying this guitar???

    Do you like it??? Does it sound and play good to you???

    Then buy it, and ignore all the snobs.

    Trust yourself and trust your playing.


    I've owned and played hand-made this and that guitar with those certain pickups that everyone was talking about that one year... blah blah blah. Had to sell them all for reasons. I now own and solely play a stock (OMG he left in the original pickup and tailpiece!!! [Low-Fi is the new Hi-Fi]) 1997 Epiphone Emperor Regent. I love it! Its a great sounding and playing guitar and its fun to play.

    All the noise you read above are just opinions we use to make ourselves feel better about the fact that we've all spent too much money on six pieces of steel and a block of wood.
    Seeking beauty and truth through six strings.

  32. #31

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    Quote Originally Posted by TheGrandWazoo View Post
    Are you searching the internet because you're thinking of buying this guitar???

    Do you like it??? Does it sound and play good to you???

    Then buy it, and ignore all the snobs.

    Trust yourself and trust your playing.


    I've owned and played hand-made this and that guitar with those certain pickups that everyone was talking about that one year... blah blah blah. Had to sell them all for reasons. I now own and solely play a stock (OMG he left in the original pickup and tailpiece!!! [Low-Fi is the new Hi-Fi]) 1997 Epiphone Emperor Regent. I love it! Its a great sounding and playing guitar and its fun to play.

    All the noise you read above are just opinions we use to make ourselves feel better about the fact that we've all spent too much money on six pieces of steel and a block of wood.
    Did you bump a 10 year old thread for this?

  33. #32

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    Seeking beauty and truth through six strings.

  34. #33

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    Quote Originally Posted by customxke View Post
    Did you bump a 10 year old thread for this?
    Appears so. Funnier will be the folks upstream who wake up to likes of posts I just gave to a thread they've long forgotten...lol

    Red Green.....love it. Hahaha

    Sent from my SM-G960U using Tapatalk
    1948 Gibson L-7N
    1981 Epi Emperor T (MIJ Matsumoku)
    1998 Epi Zephyr Regent (Peerless)
    1992 Gibson Les Paul Studio
    2004 Gibson SG Special Faded
    2006 Epi G-1275 (MIK, Unsung)
    2013 Squier Affinity Telecaster, BSB
    (among others)

  35. #34

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    Maybe an appropriate ten-year bump of the thread titled "HOW'S YOUR EPIPHONE EMPEROR REGENT HOLDING UP?" [AFTER TEN YEARS OF USE]

  36. #35

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    Ah, I remember this first time around.

    Hasn't aged much,

    Um.....
    “When a wise man points at the moon the fool considers the finger.”

  37. #36

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    Ha! I bet half the people on this old thread don't have an Epi or don't come here anymore, or both. The bashing is kinda funny.

    Personally I'm interested in a Regent if I could find a good Korean one for say, $500 bucks. I just tried one at a show that was good, but seller wouldn't come down from $600 and it only had a gig bag.

    I have a Broadway from early 2000's I play a lot lately for outdoor big band gigs. I don't have to worry about it! The pickups aren't the best, but better than the JP Emperor I had. I've been through the mod process with Epiphones, even bought a 2nd Joe Pass with work already done on it. Fun project, but not worth it in the end.

    Since this thread started, there's a lot more choices out there, with Guild and D'Angelico re-issues.