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  1. #101

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    I love my luthier friend - and he is a dear friend. Danny Dolinger at Fret Boss in the Shenandoah Valley of Virginia. He used to be the neck, fretboard and fret guy at Huss & Dalton acoustic guitars. (My favorite boutique acoustic.) He's on his own now. His only fault is that he absolutely hates Gibson as a company. If I walk in the door with a brand new 175 sold for thousands of dollars that came from the factory with a mis-cut nut...Good God in heaven, I'll never hear the end of it!

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  3. #102

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    Quote Originally Posted by TedBPhx
    Where might I find this year code?
    Ted, Mine actually says 2017 under the serial number.

  4. #103

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    Quote Originally Posted by vinnyv1k
    Go by your local Luthier’s shop and get a old bone nut out of his garbage can. Take it home and file it down with a metal file (not sandpaper) to get your bone dust.

    Gibson now uses there plek machine to cut there nuts. Obviously someone isn’t doing a proper setup on the plek machine. A plek machine is only as good as the operator that sets in the commands.

    We are seeing a lot of these misaligned cut nuts. QAman got one on a 335 also so it is not just 175’s.
    Also Gibson has been hand rolling the fretboard edge that can lead to excessive fret end bevel.
    Combine the 2 and you have a high E roll off problem. Still a simple fix at the price point we paid.
    At $4k a problem. At $2k no biggie as Marco has stated.

    CME was very upfront from the get go stating minor issues. A nut is a minor issue.
    Damn.. Im an idiot. I have the bone nut off my HJS18 sitting in the friggin case pocket. If I had a 1/4 of a brain, I would have figured that out on my own.
    Thanks Vin. (again)..
    (I know, I can hear you now saying, "Oh boy Joe, what do you want me to play it for you too??")

  5. #104

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    Quote Originally Posted by Max405
    Ted, Mine actually says 2017 under the serial number.
    The 2016’s are year stamped also. At least no 2nd stamp like the old days.

    I don’t think that these CME specials are 2nd’s as the 2 I purchased early in the year at full price have the same minor type flaws. I think it is just normal Gibson. Some are great, some good, and some plain bad. Just typical dice roll Gibson as they always have been.

    It has been a good year for many of us though getting a nice Gibson at a more than fair price.
    CME and Gibson made a lot of dreams come true and put some serious smiles on a lot of faces.
    Gibson’s financial woes certainly benefited us. For once the little guy wins.

  6. #105

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    Operation "baking soda and super glue complete"! No more slippage of the E string. I'm sure I'll get a new nut at some point, but I've already forgotten about it.

  7. #106

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    Quote Originally Posted by vinnyv1k
    The 2016’s are year stamped also. At least no 2nd stamp like the old days.

    I don’t think that these CME specials are 2nd’s as the 2 I purchased early in the year at full price have the same minor type flaws. I think it is just normal Gibson. Some are great, some good, and some plain bad. Just typical dice roll Gibson as they always have been.

    It has been a good year for many of us though getting a nice Gibson at a more than fair price.
    CME and Gibson made a lot of dreams come true and put some serious smiles on a lot of faces.
    Gibson’s financial woes certainly benefited us. For once the little guy wins.
    Couldn't agree more bro.
    This deal should make people happy. There is nothing to bitch about here.

    Quote Originally Posted by SkipBurz
    Operation "baking soda and super glue complete"! No more slippage of the E string. I'm sure I'll get a new nut at some point, but I've already forgotten about it.
    Yay! Now play it for 2 hours. You will feel like the luckiest person in the world.
    JD

  8. #107

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    Quote Originally Posted by SkipBurz
    Ted, If I'm interpreting your question correctly, modern Gibson serial numbers contain seven digits. The first number is the decade and the fourth digit is the year. The second, third and four digits are the day-of-the year. So, a serial number of 80429234, would be the 42nd day of 1989. (They assume you know the century). The last three digits are the production number. In this case, the 234th guitar of this kind made that year. (I believe that's correct.) So, my new 175 is 13566xxx. That's the 356th day of 2016 (December 21st). I hope that was your question. Skip B.
    Yes, but the necks get the serial number (and the Made In USA) stamped prior to paint, so it's not indicative of when it actually gets inspected, or shipped. A 83569xxx serial probably hit the inspection bench in Jan. 1990.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  9. #108

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    I guess mine is a '17 around march.

    The top E string nut issue is a minor annoyance.
    Maybe I'll mess with it some day, but I'm still in tonal nirvana.
    Can't believe I even own a 175 -- the dream guitar that I mostly thought of as unattainable.

    I'm still playing the factory strings. 10s? 11s? Not sure, but sounding good enough for now.

  10. #109

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    I'm with you. I have spent so many years trying to get my 335 to sound like a 175 that it's amazing to actually own the "gold standard".

    I believe the guitar ships with 10 gauge roundwound strings. You might want to just try a set of flatwounds, if you've never used them. An inexpensive set of D'addario Chrome ECG24 11-50 is a good place to start.

  11. #110

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    Quote Originally Posted by SkipBurz
    I'm with you. I have spent so many years trying to get my 335 to sound like a 175 that it's amazing to actually own the "gold standard".

    I believe the guitar ships with 10 gauge roundwound strings. You might want to just try a set of flatwounds, if you've never used them. An inexpensive set of D'addario Chrome ECG24 11-50 is a good place to start.
    They ship these with 11-52 rounds.

  12. #111

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    My serial number works out to July of 2016. 2016 is stamped on the headstock. Apparently mine is the 706th 175 made that year. Or is that the number of all guitars manufactured at the Memphis plant? We’re they cranking out 3 175s a day that year?

  13. #112

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    Interesting. I had a little factory card in my case that said the guitar was shipped with 10 gauge PB roundwounds. I had CME put flats on it before they sent it, so I have no way of verifying whether that was, in fact, the case.

    Quick bridge question for anyone out there: I haven't done a string change yet on the guitar, but when I had the strings loose to do the nut adjustment yesterday, I noticed that the bridge had pins on the underside of the feet running through the top of the guitar to hold it in place, I assume. Has Gibson been doing that long? The 175s I've borrow and played in the past (from the 70s and 80s) I don't think had these.

  14. #113

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    They started the pinned bridge in 2016.

  15. #114

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    Interesting. What do you think?....Any drawbacks you can see?

  16. #115

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    Quote Originally Posted by Max405
    ...or Steve Howe playing “Mood for a Day” in my mind.
    Ahh, another Howe head. Great man on the 175 himself, ol' Steve.

    Amazing thread, sure does feel like Christmas. Best of the season to both of you.

  17. #116

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    Pinned bridge? As long as it is in the right place, it's fine. I don't see a down side and it can be pretty helpful.


    Quote Originally Posted by SkipBurz
    Interesting. What do you think?....Any drawbacks you can see?

  18. #117

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    Quote Originally Posted by Marty Grass
    Pinned bridge? As long as it is in the right place, it's fine. I don't see a down side and it can be pretty helpful.
    I’ve seen pinned bridges where the holes are really pin holes. The holes on my top are around 3/16”. They accomodate the threaded rods that hold the Tuneomatic in place. They extend through the bridge base and clean through the top. Eternally covered by the bridgebase. With optimal action, the intonation is dead on.

    Ive been playing this guitar exclusively for a couple of weeks. I am totally SPOILED!! The sweet voice, sustain and playability all in one guitar, make this guitar an all time great for me. Not to mention the sentimental factor..

    Joe D

  19. #118

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    If you're cutting a new slot and moving the string, the baking soda and CA will hold fine, because there is no force on it. The chemical reaction between the soda and cyanoacrylate produces a very hard substance and a very tight bond. I wouldn't bother to replace the nut unless the filled slot was just too ugly to stand, but in Joe's pic you can't even see where it was, a very neat repair, and IMO it's just not worth worrying about, or the cost of a replacement nut. Joe can do as he likes, but if it were my guitar, I would be done with it.

  20. #119

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    Quote Originally Posted by sgosnell
    If you're cutting a new slot and moving the string, the baking soda and CA will hold fine, because there is no force on it. The chemical reaction between the soda and cyanoacrylate produces a very hard substance and a very tight bond. I wouldn't bother to replace the nut unless the filled slot was just too ugly to stand, but in Joe's pic you can't even see where it was, a very neat repair, and IMO it's just not worth worrying about, or the cost of a replacement nut. Joe can do as he likes, but if it were my guitar, I would be done with it.
    That’s what I thought too. But because the old slot was so close to the new one, I filed the baking soda off and out and replaced it with bone powder donated by the original nut from the HJS18. But SG, I believe you are correct about the permanency of the baking soda Super glue mixture. It was extremely hard, not brittle and it felt like it was a part of the original bone.
    One thing..
    There is something about a brand new guitar that is special. The responsibility of keeping it nice is no big deal to. It’s just what I do anyway. A brand new 175 is a luxury indeed. It’s been said before and should be said again. This was an opportunity of a lifetime for a lot of people. Who knows but most likely never to happen again. The folks who were able to get one of these were blessed. I am as critical as anyone and I don’t see anything about these guitars that should classify them as inferior in any way. It’s just as exclusive as a $4,000 175. Some typical Gibson QC issues aside, they didn’t cut a single corner in these 175’s. All being worthy of the “benchmark” moniker.
    Joe D

  21. #120

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    I still think bone dust is a better fix as does Frank Ford. Frank uses the dentist fix though. After the repair take a Dremel polishing wheel and polish the nut to a high gloss with some light compound. It will shine like lacquer.

    Moving 1 string over now means unequal string spacing though. A new $75 nut is still my call as the right thing to do.

    Everyone has different priorities. I would rather have perfection and a little less money. Some prefer a thicker wallet and less than stellar. What ever makes you happy.

    Just like the guy that buys a new L5 and then plays it through a cheap Blues Jr.

    My motto is don’t half step. Poop or get off the pot.

  22. #121

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    How about a compromise? When the current nut slot wears down, replace it.

    I've done the baking soda/Super Glue thing and have not yet worn through the repair. These were more vulnerable because they were corrections from my overcutting the slots during my first dozen or so attempts.

  23. #122

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    Quote Originally Posted by Marty Grass
    How about a compromise? When the current nut slot wears down, replace it.

    I've done the baking soda/Super Glue thing and have not yet worn through the repair. These were more vulnerable because they were corrections from my overcutting the slots during my first dozen or so attempts.
    Question from a noob to nut repair. What did you use to cut the slot? Also, I assume you need the liquidy superglue, not the gel type?

  24. #123

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    I honestly think the string was too far over. In fact it could actually still moved closer to the B string. But I’ll leave it alone. It is very symmetrical right now. Feels good when I’m playing it. Been playing faster stuff now so I don’t have to think about not pulling the string down and off the fretboard.


    Quote Originally Posted by vinnyv1k
    I still think bone dust is a better fix as does Frank Ford. Frank uses the dentist fix though. After the repair take a Dremel polishing wheel and polish the nut to a high gloss with some light compound. It will shine like lacquer.

    Moving 1 string over now means unequal string spacing though. A new $75 nut is still my call as the right thing to do.

    Everyone has different priorities. I would rather have perfection and a little less money. Some prefer a thicker wallet and less than stellar. What ever makes you happy.

    Just like the guy that buys a new L5 and then plays it through a cheap Blues Jr.

    My motto is don’t half step. Poop or get off the pot.

  25. #124

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    My opinions tend to be very black and white. I very much realize that. If it is right for you that is all that matters.
    I tend to be overly anal about just about everything not just guitars.

    Joe’s repair will most likely last a good while.

  26. #125

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    Ideally, you use a set of nut files to cut the slots. But those are very spendy if you only need one or two, or even several, nuts made. There are several choices, depending on what tools you have on hand or are willing to spend for more. One choice is a set of feeler gauges, with teeth filed into the edges. Another is a jeweler's saw, or something similar, or needle files if you're very careful. Probably the cheapest and easiest is the feeler gauges. You can get a set very cheaply, because you don't need the best quality, and the lower quality is probably better for this. It takes time and effort to get some teeth made, but once that's done you're pretty much set, and can select the necessary sizes for each string, a couple of thousandths thicker than the string. And yes, thinner CA glue works better. Gel isn't the best choice, water thin is better.

  27. #126

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    Quote Originally Posted by vinnyv1k
    My opinions tend to be very black and white. I very much realize that. If it is right for you that is all that matters.
    I tend to be overly anal about just about everything not just guitars.

    Joe’s repair will most likely last a good while.
    And wonderfully self-aware and capable of self-reflection, which redeems any excesses! I was glad to learn about the repair and variations on how it's done. I'm assessing my new ES175. I do find I slide the high-e string off to the side sometimes where I don't on other guitars. Might need to look into this thing.

  28. #127

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    One thing to check if one string is too close to the edge of the fretboard is the bridge. It can be off-center, and cause all the strings to slide to one side. It usually happens at string change, but it's possible for the bridge to get knocked off to the side with the strings in place. Not common, but possible. This will also usually put the strings off the centers of the pickup polepieces. This is not always the cause, but it's very quick and easy to check, and to correct if necessary.

  29. #128

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    Not on these new ones. The bridge is pinned through the body. Bridge cannot be moved.

  30. #129

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    Well, it can be, but it takes some work.

    I had forgotten about the pinned bridges, because one of the first things I did was to unpin mine. I had to move it to get the intonation right, and then I just removed the TOM and replaced it with an ebony bridge.

  31. #130

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    Yes just cut the studs in half. The base will still most likely cover the holes.

  32. #131

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    The posts are threaded into the base. Just unscrew them until they're no longer sticking out of the bottom of the base. No need to cut them.

  33. #132

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    Quote Originally Posted by sgosnell
    The posts are threaded into the base. Just unscrew them until they're no longer sticking out of the bottom of the base. No need to cut them.
    They are very long on mine. Then they would be coming out of the top of the tun-o-matic.

  34. #133

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    Saw them off if it bothers you. It doesn't bother me. But switching to a new ebony bridge solves all the problems.

  35. #134

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    Quote Originally Posted by vinnyv1k
    Not on these new ones. The bridge is pinned through the body. Bridge cannot be moved.
    Didn't you post something about the bridge base on yours being reversed? Might that cause a little displacement of the strings?

  36. #135

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    Yes on one the bridge was off center. I flipped the base and that made it perfectly center to the fretboard.

  37. #136

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    I'm resurrecting this thread as I too have just gotten my new ES 175 from CME (actually if you believe the COA it is an ES 75..whoever was tasked with writing out the COA forgot the 1 ..believe it or not ..I won't mention the chicken scratch..oh I just did ). Anyway..

    My High E is positioned right above the top edge of the downward bevel of the fret, press it down and it is at the edge of the bevel. As you go down towards the bridge it transitions more away from the edge. Everything else is fine about the guitar, the binding is a little funky at spots, even a few dings would have been fine but this issue has me bummed. The spacing is otherwise even so re-slotting one slot is not an option.

    Are these bevels something new? Do you other new 175 owners have these bevels? I don't recall my other Gibsons having them, at least not this extreme..like a straight, non rounded 45 degree angle..ski slope like. I assume the PLEK made this perfect straight bevel. I'll look at some of my other Gibsons tonite. The bevel really is taking some meat off the fret it seems. If it is a nut problem only no biggie but if the frets are a factor too that is another matter. There is a three day return period, my time is limited to fool around with it, I'm busy during the day. I'm on the fence.

  38. #137

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    Tricky decision. Well maybe easy decision and unfortunate situation.

    I think some others who treasure their new 175’s might offer suggestions that can help.

  39. #138

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    This seems to be a real problem. I bought 4 of these 175’s. 3 were perfect and 1 had the excessive bevel but not bad enough to send back.

    If you really love this one send it back and have the CME guys fix it or they will gladly replace it.
    For me the 3 perfect ones were 2016’s and the one with excessive bevel was a 2017.

    CME is very aware of this. Also on the 335’s. Very sorry for you but CME will make it right for you including a full refund if you so desire. Still it sucks. Being disappointed by Gibson ......I know your pain.

  40. #139
    Quote Originally Posted by 73Fender
    I'm resurrecting this thread as I too have just gotten my new ES 175 from CME (actually if you believe the COA it is an ES 75..whoever was tasked with writing out the COA forgot the 1 ..believe it or not ..I won't mention the chicken scratch..oh I just did ). Anyway..

    My High E is positioned right above the top edge of the downward bevel of the fret, press it down and it is at the edge of the bevel. As you go down towards the bridge it transitions more away from the edge. Everything else is fine about the guitar, the binding is a little funky at spots, even a few dings would have been fine but this issue has me bummed. The spacing is otherwise even so re-slotting one slot is not an option.

    Are these bevels something new? Do you other new 175 owners have these bevels? I don't recall my other Gibsons having them, at least not this extreme..like a straight, non rounded 45 degree angle..ski slope like. I assume the PLEK made this perfect straight bevel. I'll look at some of my other Gibsons tonite. The bevel really is taking some meat off the fret it seems. If it is a nut problem only no biggie but if the frets are a factor too that is another matter. There is a three day return period, my time is limited to fool around with it, I'm busy during the day. I'm on the fence.
    I had the same experience with one of these recent CME 175's. I have decided to send it back. On mine if you look at the bevel, they also rolled the binding in such a way that it looks like you couldn't refret it over the binding and recover some real estate on the fingerboard. Somebody must have programmed their Plek machine wrong for this batch (just a hunch). I may look at the VOS 175 reissues as they a wider fret board to begin with. I feel your pain and am working to send mine back.

    Didn't mean to hijack your thread Max405 but wanted to share some blues with a fellow jazzguitar.be member.

  41. #140

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    Quote Originally Posted by rhoadsscholar
    I had the same experience with one of these recent CME 175's. I have decided to send it back. On mine if you look at the bevel, they also rolled the binding in such a way that it looks like you couldn't refret it over the binding and recover some real estate on the fingerboard. Somebody must have programmed their Plek machine wrong for this batch (just a hunch).
    This is the more significant problem, the rolled binding. And indeed a real estate problem unless you are willing to accept narrower string spacing. EVEN after fret work, nut work, and even fingerboard work before a re-fret - or partial refret.

    Even famous people can not make material re-appear after someone has scraped it away.

    But of course many players are very willing to accept this situation. Reduce string spacing is completely unproblematic to many.

    ”Rolled” FB edges or binding (on a bound FB) is a sort of relic’ing gone wrong.

    Again, it does not bother some.

    ******

    deleted my walk though of the flow of events that would have a supplier described as aware send this guitar to 73Fender

    ******

    Love Gibson designs, like CME just fine.

    Repeat as necessary,...

  42. #141

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    ^^ No hijack at all, I welcome all input. Rhodes, I was just playing it through one of KBP's Deluxe Reverb builds with some reverb and just a touch of subtle OD and it is a glorious tone for sure. Makes this situation that much more sadder but I think I will return it. My gut tells me to. I even waited the 24hrs to open the box, oh well, it wasn't meant to be. If I had a good guitar tech near by to get some good advice I would. My days are packed with work right now.

    I looked at a few other Gibsons just now. My 2013 R7 has binding material (nibs) coming up further on the frets, same with my 2013 330. Hard to judge the angle with my old tired eyes ha ha. Maybe I'm just seeing more metal I don't know.

    I was also just thinking maybe a 59 model. So the fret board is wider? It also has a wooden bridge. I put the digital calipers on the nut area of the 175, right at 1.7" exactly like my Heritage 525 I had out at the same time.

    Thanks for the advice.

  43. #142

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    Mine is really not that bad. The frets are beveled and the nibs are reduced. My fretboard was not reduced in any way. But the nut work I did and sliding the strings over toward the bass side helped.
    But honestly, you shouldn’t have to struggle with a less than perfect, brand new guitar. I don’t care how much of a discount you got in it.
    They knowingly dumped these guitars on the general public. Not cool.
    Cant win em all..
    JD

  44. #143

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    Quote Originally Posted by vinnyv1k
    This seems to be a real problem. I bought 4 of these 175’s. 3 were perfect and 1 had the excessive bevel but not bad enough to send back.

    If you really love this one send it back and have the CME guys fix it or they will gladly replace it.
    For me the 3 perfect ones were 2016’s and the one with excessive bevel was a 2017.

    CME is very aware of this. Also on the 335’s. Very sorry for you but CME will make it right for you including a full refund if you so desire. Still it sucks. Being disappointed by Gibson ......I know your pain.
    2 of my CME Gibsons are 2016's, 2 of them are 2017's. The frets/nuts/necks/bindings are fine on all 4.

    I think it is luck of the draw. I got pretty lucky. Sorry to hear about all of those whose luck was not so good. CME will make it right.

  45. #144

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    I bought a 2017 from CME a few months ago and had the same issue - occasionally the E string would slide off the neck while chording up and down the neck. I borrowed my luthier buddy's nut slot ruler and found that the high E slot was cut just a touch too close to the edge - not even a 12 gauge string's width. Therefore, I can't say for sure it isn't a combination of the bevel and the nut slot. I'll eventually get a new nut, but for now I did the super glue and baking soda trick. I moved it one string's width closer to the B string. It has worked great through a couple of string changes and I don't notice the slight width difference at all. I loved the feel and sound of the guitar too much right out of the box to send it back. I immediately bonded with the guitar, so I accepted the flaw.

  46. #145

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    Ah, those pinned bridges. Gibson did this when they started factory stringing with .10 gauge sets to encourage the "I'm a cowboy. ..on a steel horse I'll ride" folks to try a 175. Didn't want the bridge shifting under a power chord.

    PITA, pinned bridges, IMO.

  47. #146

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    A question about the pinned bridges on the 175s. This is the first time I'm dealing with it. It hasn't bothered me so far because they got the bridge placement right on my guitar - the intonation is good, the saddles are adjusted within an acceptable range, I can get the action right, etc. But what if I want to try a rosewood bridge? Is there a way to remove the pins to have a traditional floating bridge configuration? Last string change, I just lifted the bridge a bit to see that it was pinned, but haven't pulled it off to see exactly how it's constructed and installed. Thanks.

  48. #147

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    Here's a few points.

    1. AFAIK, the Memphis Gibsons are not PLEK'd.

    2. The bridge base pins will easily come out. You can put another base on for very little money, too. It's not a problem.

    3. I don't know how I lucked out, but I have had none of the reported CME problems. Knock on wood! The detailing on two of them was not the best, but it cost me $30 to correct the cosmetics and bring them up to Nashville quality.

  49. #148

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    Quote Originally Posted by SkipBurz
    A question about the pinned bridges on the 175s. This is the first time I'm dealing with it. It hasn't bothered me so far because they got the bridge placement right on my guitar - the intonation is good, the saddles are adjusted within an acceptable range, I can get the action right, etc. But what if I want to try a rosewood bridge? Is there a way to remove the pins to have a traditional floating bridge configuration? Last string change, I just lifted the bridge a bit to see that it was pinned, but haven't pulled it off to see exactly how it's constructed and installed. Thanks.
    The pins are actually just extended bridge posts - extending below the bottom surface of the base into the body.

    For a quick test of a new bridge, you could simply unscrew the posts to raise them above the lower surface of the base. Do not withdraw them too far, or things get wobbly with some slight chance of damage to the threads inside the base.

    For actual playing you would likely want shorter posts. These are available.

    EDIT: Typically shorter posts are just cut down from the stock length. You can also just head to your favorite hardware store and buy machine screws and cut them down. Bring a thumb wheel to ensure you get the right screws.

    Most often USA bridges will be 6-32, while metric will be 4mm (maybe M4 x .7????? but I believe there are two 4mm thread pitches available)

    I have never found a difference in the post metal to matter at all. Brass is heavier and softer than steel - which seems immaterial in this case.

    If you do cut down screws, put the nice looking end on top.

    Or buy official posts from the usual suppliers - you will often still need to cut them down.

    Chris
    Last edited by ptchristopher3; 02-15-2018 at 10:54 AM.

  50. #149

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    You know, it would actually be pretty cool to have an extra bridge set for this guitar.
    I feel, it would RADICALLY alter the sound of it. And not in a bad way. As this guitar currently is constructed, it is a unique sounding Crisp tone and Sustain machine. I believe a rosewood bridge and new base would change the guitars tone a lot. Not worse, not better. Just differently.

  51. #150

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    Quote Originally Posted by Max405
    You know, it would actually be pretty cool to have an extra bridge set for this guitar.
    I feel, it would RADICALLY alter the sound of it. And not in a bad way. As this guitar currently is constructed, it is a unique sounding Crisp tone and Sustain machine. I believe a rosewood bridge and new base would change the guitars tone a lot. Not worse, not better. Just differently.
    Have our man Matt build you one.