Reply to Thread Bookmark Thread
Page 2 of 8 FirstFirst 1234 ... LastLast
Posts 51 to 100 of 382
  1. #51

    User Info Menu

    I'm all about the strat these days. I love the look of the tele, but the strat is a much more comfortable body style for me. The belly cut/arm cut, etc really make the instrument very comfortable to sit with for extended periods of time.

    Everything else is pickup/strings/fingerboard and those bad boys are interchangeable!

  2.  

    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #52

    User Info Menu

    I have had alot of strats where I put a humbucker in the neck position. makes a much better jazz guitar as opposed to the single coil...the single coil is really tough to get a fat clean tone out of. ANy of the seymour duncan paf types work great....the Fender Big Apple setup is ideal. I like having the strat around for outside gigs where I dont want to take a really expensive archtop.

  4. #53

    User Info Menu

    Plenty of guys out their using strats for jazz including Wayne Krantz, Nir Felder and Chris Crocco.

  5. #54

    User Info Menu

    Those are some fantastic videos guys! Thanks for the links.
    Here are a few I've accumulated...










    I agree about art in music and form. Could just hang one on the wall as modern art sculpture.

  6. #55

    User Info Menu

    Is there any guitar designed to be more comfortable than a strat? If you close your eyes and listen, it's a jazz box, if I want it to sound like one.

  7. #56

    User Info Menu

    You're right Max, and that has been my experience. I've played them (the nicer ones) A/B against many different archtops (in same price range) in music stores through the same amp and with the right settings and picking technique have have gotten as smooth and warm a tone as the archtops (actually better than the lower-medium priced archies). True, that the more expensive Strats are the same price as the Medium to Lower-Medium priced archtops, but that's also part of my point.

  8. #57

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by Retroman1969
    ...
    Oh and of course there's the old footage of Quentin Warren for further evidence (and he's even using the bridge pup! "position 5")

    I have a hard time believing that's the bridge pickup. I think it's more likely that he simply took the selector switch out and reinstalled it backwards, possibly because he might have kept knocking it out of position.

  9. #58

    User Info Menu

    I got to thinking about that later as well, because that can be an issue on Stratocasters, and I even thought about doing it myself for the same reason.
    Of course he's probably playing flatwound .13s or .14s on that thing too. Not that uncommon back then, even on solid bodies.

  10. #59

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by gadabout55
    I have a hard time believing that's the bridge pickup. I think it's more likely that he simply took the selector switch out and reinstalled it backwards, possibly because he might have kept knocking it out of position.
    which reminds me...if there is one thing I dislike about strats, its the pickup selector switch. I mean, it makes sense that it rotates vs. being linear since there are 5 positions...but at the same time, for an instrument where you may want to use that crazy trem bar like Hendrix, you would think it makes more sense to have the selector switch more 'locked' down. Anyway...


    90% of time i'm playing my strat-caster, which is funny because over these couple years I've removed all of the most 'stratty' things about it- I might as well have just started with a tele in the first place!!

    my guitar has no tremolo bar, no single coils, no bridge pup, no middle pup, no selector switch, no second tone knob, no strat style-knobs, no bridge float, and no fender decals....at this point I might as well just call it a solid body accident turned favorite guitar haha (to each his own i guess??) :-)


    let the tele-partscaster-space-invasion begin! just kidding ;-)


    I like the strat body design in a way and Warmoth-strat headstock though, so that's a plus for some people that like those aspects.

    To each his own. So many cool ideas and options here-gotta love the diversity!

  11. #60
    Quote Originally Posted by kobrian
    I'm using 9s now so I'll move up to 10s until I get used to them and then onto 11s. My trem currently has three springs so I'll add two more. Thanks for the advice. Also, I did finally find someone who actually used a Fender Jazzmaster for Jazz! Joe Pass recorded and album called Sounds of Synanon using a Jazzmaster. (Then again, he was in drug rehab and it was the only guitar they had in the place!). Still, I'm trying to track down the album--I'd love to hear what it sounds like.
    in the beginning i used a 50's strat and from time to time i stil like to play on my strat. i have 13 flatwound on it + i blocked my trem to get more sustain. in order to do so try to get rid of the finish between your trem-block and your guitar body and than you have to insert a wood-block between your trem-block and your guitar body.

    and by the way, i guess you can skip to an 11 gauge set of strings.

  12. #61

    User Info Menu

    Everyone has different taste and what works for one person will not work for another. I have a Fender Strat with 010's on it, and I personally do not like it for jazz. The G&L Legacy (Leo Fender's design) has pickups that have a Strat sound but the pickups sound fuller than the thin sound of the Fender pickup. If I was going to do jazz on a Strat type of guitar, I would go with a G&L Legacy with 011's or 012's on them. I would also only play without a pick to get a warmer tone. But like we know, put 5 guitar players on the same guitar and amp and they will all sound different.

  13. #62

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by kobrian
    I'm using 9s now so I'll move up to 10s until I get used to them and then onto 11s. My trem currently has three springs so I'll add two more. Thanks for the advice. Also, I did finally find someone who actually used a Fender Jazzmaster for Jazz! Joe Pass recorded and album called Sounds of Synanon using a Jazzmaster. (Then again, he was in drug rehab and it was the only guitar they had in the place!). Still, I'm trying to track down the album--I'd love to hear what it sounds like.
    First thing I'd offer up is DEFINITELY lose the 9s.

    I had a Mexican Strat for a while and tried to get a clean jazzy-fusiony sound out of it. I used 11-52 Earnie Ball Custom Set, with a 12 replacing the 11, if I recall. This recording (attached) is TERRIBLE quality, but it shows what a Strat can sound like with the tone rolled down, bass rolled down to 2, mid up to 8 or higher, treble at 4 or 5.

    I have several examples of this setting, but this is the slowest tempo, so the tone is more apparent. Hope it helps a little anyway - sorry for the shitty quality. Use headphones.
    Last edited by Kojo27; 08-09-2011 at 05:44 AM. Reason: attachment didn't play

  14. #63
    I had a fender stratocaster 3years ago , I traded it for a Gibson LP studio because of the sound, tone .. I never liked the to e of the fender for jazz, but now I miss it do much because it is a lot easyer to play on the strat than on the LP. And the strat is way lighter then the Gibson ...
    So I m thinking of getting a strat again and try sone flat wound strings... Better amp...

  15. #64

    User Info Menu

    Check out Jimmy Herring's Lifeboat. Jimmy typically plays a Strat with two Lollar Imperial humbuckers.

    Jazz article: “Jimmy Herring: Lifeboat” by Ian Patterson

  16. #65
    A strat feels like butter in your hands, small frets so easy to play...
    A Gibson model takes more work to play , but the sound of a Gibson is better in my opinion.

  17. #66

    User Info Menu

    You should probably qualify what you call Jazz. I have a strat again after many years without one and IMO stock they aren't for straight Jazz. They are fine for Fusion or other styles involving pedals or overdriven amps. The ones I've heard that sounded okay for straight Jazz all had humbuckers even then I think a tele does a better job.

  18. #67

    User Info Menu

    I had my luthier build me a strat with a flatter radius finger board. It's an ebony board with white binding and abalone dot position marker inlays. Ronaldo had a piece of 25 year old alder he used for the body. It's got active EMGs in it. Got it strung with .011s. It's my jazz strat. I love it.

  19. #68

    User Info Menu


    Never found a better jazz tone.

  20. #69

    User Info Menu

    I think that's an awesome tone, too.

  21. #70

    User Info Menu

    I really like when a strat sounds like, well a strat. You know, when you hear it without seeing it you think, "that's a nice strat tone". I don't think of it as a jazz tone, but jazz chords sound all chimey and nice on one.


  22. #71

    User Info Menu

    Yep, Strat tone is very nice, indeed. Not really a jazz guitar but the the clarity of the pickups really does justice to extended chords.

  23. #72

    User Info Menu

    In my 55 years of playing, I have played all types, sizes and shapes of guitars. Due to a bad shoulder I was having trouble getting my right arm around a full size jazz box. My sons were kind enough to gift me a beautiful black Strat HSS. Oh no I thought. this is the end, I gave up rock and country 20 years ago. But with practice, doing a couple of simple mods and the right strings to the guitar, I now would never be without it. I can play for hours and once the amp is tuned in right, it's one of the sweetest sounding guitars I've played. Amazing what those 3 pickups can do with a little imagination and experimentation.

    JM

  24. #73

    User Info Menu

    Here is a clip from a gig where I used my custom shop deluxe strat on
    "My shinning hour". It is strung with 11's. I was going through a roland jc120.
    SoundClick artist: Jostein Gulbrandsen - page with MP3 music downloads
    Here is the same guitar in a blues/fusion video:

  25. #74

    User Info Menu

    If you think a strat is "out there", my latest jazz axe is a 61 reissue sg. With thomastik gb 12 flats, it sings. Pickups were perfect out of the box and I adore the neck carve, weight and comfort. It doesn't get better for me.... Unless someone thinks I'm trying to be angus young )

  26. #75
    Quote Originally Posted by kevro2000
    Michael Johnson asks, "Anyone try using the bridge position at all?"

    I answer, "yes." In short bursts of time, but like you say, its for accenting and I tend to turn the last tone knob down between the 3 & 5 setting, or all the way up to the 10, which has an interesting sound to it, not "high and harsh" at all. Plus, with the s1 switch down, I really like the bridge tone.
    Hello, I've been lurking for quite some time. This is my first comment, been playing since 1963, a late bloomer jazz fanatic since 2008. I'm a beginner all over again and loving it. Wanted to mention that if you probe the Ted Greene 1993 GIT Seminar on youtube (sorry don't recall which of the 6 or more parts), he switches to the bridge pickup during a Bach-like passage as he meandered from playing Autumn leaves. Of Course it's a Tele and not a Strat, but it is a twangy-esque single coil at the bridge. I think that Twin Reverb of his makes a big difference. The change of his tone was mearly a brightness in my estimation (a treble boost), but the tone was consistent. I'm guessing alot has to do with the hands and having your pickups adjusted properly so it's seamless. Sure is interesting stuff though.

  27. #76

    User Info Menu

    The Strat can do,and can do it good,I have one from the 80's...
    but i prefere this baby,when it comes to solid bodies "jazzin' around"

  28. #77

    User Info Menu

    Since I started playing again I have had no use for strats. I have tried quite a few and just cant get jazz vibe that inspires me. My own strat (a 76 Ibanez challenger actually) sat in pieced for years while I tried to find the time to refin/refret the neck. Finially finished it up and replaced the stock pickups with SD ssl-2 pickups. I couldnt believe a) how much nicer it is than any other strat I have played. Light and resonant. The new pickups actually make the whole thing usable. It still just sits in the case because it is not the best tool for the job but in a pinch it will do.

    I love Carls playing on the link above but tone wise I feel.. meh.

  29. #78

    User Info Menu

    This guy has a nice sound and playing. Here he explains the jazz tone he obtains with his Am std strato.


  30. #79

    User Info Menu

    While I'm not a huge fan of Smooth or Fusion, I do occasionally dig that style of playing in the Loeb link. A relaxing "city-at-night" feel to it.

    Rexi, wow man, love your playing! Back then I was debating Little 59 or CR, and went with the 59 on a coin toss pretty much. Sounds like the CR is beautifully mellow. The 59 didn't so much mellow the sound of the Strat as it warmed and fattened it up.

    Even though I later switched to 175 style Archies as the jazz weapon of choice, I always like to have at least one Fender around, for their unique personality and history if nothing else. Incredibly versatile guits for something so simple.

  31. #80

    User Info Menu

    The strat played in the JHJS videos seems to have a neck pickup with a bar instead of individual polepieces.
    Last edited by gcb; 01-05-2013 at 09:46 AM. Reason: error

  32. #81

    User Info Menu

    I mainly played teles and love them for any style of music. I recently got a Strat I like, but I just can't get into them for jazz. Part of the strat sound is that plinkly note attack from its vibrato system, I don't like that in a jazz sound.

  33. #82

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by docbop
    I mainly played teles and love them for any style of music. I recently got a Strat I like, but I just can't get into them for jazz. Part of the strat sound is that plinkly note attack from its vibrato system, I don't like that in a jazz sound.
    You could always "block" the trem system . . . in effect, making it a "hard tail".

  34. #83

    User Info Menu

    Here is Mordy Ferber playing Stella on a Strat. Unreservedly sounds like jazz guitar to me:
    .

  35. #84

    User Info Menu

    Strats are one of those guitars that sometimes need their fundamental character wrestled with and manipulated in order to achieve a traditional jazz tone. There's nothing wrong with that if you own a Strat, enjoy its playability, and want a more traditional jazz tone from it. I personally prefer to let my Strat be itself. I keep 10's on it and the trem floats. It sounds best just like that, and since I have lots of other guitars for jazz, it doesn't need to serve me that way.

    So the question is not if a Strat can be a jazz guitar (it can), but whether you want to potentially compromise its essential character in order to make it one.

    That said, I can get a fine jazz tone from my Strat "as is" by using the tone control, my amp, my choice of pick, and my touch appropriately.

  36. #85

    User Info Menu

    I keep my strat setup for pop/rock/fusion type styles. I don't really like the tone-knob rolled down sound, so for a darker tone on my Teles, I have WRH's in one and some very dark P90's in the other. I keep the tone and volume knobs on the guitars wide open and adjust the tone on the amp instead.

    The main difference I've found between my archtops (admittedly cheap ones) and my solid bodies is what happens when I really smack the high E string up around the 10th fret. All my guitars use 12's and fairly high action and I use the same 2.5mm Wegen picks for all of 'em as well. On the archtops, the tone remains full but on the solid bodies, it "plinks" or "spanks". I've observed this effect on 335/Les Paul type guitars as well, so I think it's the difference between solid bodies and (fully) hollow bodies.

  37. #86

    User Info Menu

    I think part of it is the extra body cavity and the strings. I have a tele so will leave the strat for non-Jazz or practice.

  38. #87

    User Info Menu

    You guys have inspired me. A co-worker just gave me a slightly neglected Peavey Predator. I'm going to get it set up, and if it's playable, install a Coolrails and make a new pickguard. Nice playing and tone from Rexi and Heavyblues. Thanks!

  39. #88

    User Info Menu

    I just built a Warmoth hardtail Strat with a 4 lb alder body and a one piece maple neck. I finished it with 2 coats of Tru-Oil and it's quite the versatile player with a set of 11's.

    Blocking the trem is not quite the same as a true hardtail, which is essentially the same setup as a Tele (string through, fixed mount bridge). Of course the Strat bridge has a smaller footprint than a Tele bridge, and the pickup does not mount within it, but it's the same principle.

  40. #89

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by rpguitar
    I just built a Warmoth hardtail Strat with a 4 lb alder body and a one piece maple neck. I finished it with 2 coats of Tru-Oil and it's quite the versatile player with a set of 11's.

    Blocking the trem is not quite the same as a true hardtail, which is essentially the same setup as a Tele (string through, fixed mount bridge). Of course the Strat bridge has a smaller footprint than a Tele bridge, and the pickup does not mount within it, but it's the same principle.
    I had a custom hard tail strat and liked it a lot had amazing sustain and none of the strat plinkiness.

  41. #90

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by aPAULo
    I do love the feel of strats, but I dont really like single-coil pickups. They, IMO, sound too flat and dont have that depth that I like, especially for jazz. You probably can play jazz on them, but I certainly cannot.
    I think it all depends on how the pick up is built. More winding and the tone fattens up but you lose the sparkle and that elusive sound that sounds like you are really hearing the inner workings of each string. I have a strat with Seymour Duncan PUs with very low resistence and Alnico 5 poles. It sounds uber glassy and somewhat like the old Rickenbacker toaster PU. Its just such a musical sound that nobody couldn't like it.

    But I also have a humbucker loaded Guild S300A that equally sounds great - just different. I guess its about choosing the right PU for each song. I'd be happy with any quality sound for jazz, including a good piezo.

  42. #91

    User Info Menu

    I saw a Youtube of Les McCann in Germany and his guitar player was playing a run of the mill American Standard Strat with 3 single coils and he sounded really good. Of course, he played really good so I think that is the key.

  43. #92

    User Info Menu

    I know this is an old thread. But this topic has been on my mind a lot lately as I want to stop the guitar merry go round I've been on.

    I have been trading up and trading down guitars for a long while. My latest go to axe is a Fender Blacktop HH. The two humbuckers with the five way switch makes for a very versatile guitar. The neck pickup is wonderfully sweet. I keep it just a little higher than the way it came to me in it's stock setup. Currently it is strung with GHS David Gilmour red set 10.5-50. I have been toying with the idea of flatwounds and will be trying them this weekend.

    One of my favorite sounds are Hammond trios. My favorite Hammond trio: Jimmy Smith's trio that included Quentin Warren.

    Exhibit #1:


    Nice tone coming out of that vintage axe with single coils.
    Last edited by Bob_H; 10-11-2014 at 05:16 PM.

  44. #93

    User Info Menu

    Never too late to post about an awesome guitar, & definitely not too late to post a Jimmy Smith vid: the guitarist I'm not familiar with, but like you say, nice tone! I liked the uniqueness of the drummer: he had my attention b4 the first 50 secs went by.

    Thanks for posting!

  45. #94

    User Info Menu

    I've been a Strat man for 30 odd years. I love the sound of a good Strat and I think they're the most flexible electric guitar ever designed. They can be unforgivingly articulate though...

  46. #95

    User Info Menu

    I am an incurable Strat man. But not a jazz guitarist. I wish. I play almost everything else (from classical guitar to punk), but not smart enough to play jazz.

  47. #96

    User Info Menu

    I think, unless you are doing just one or two songs, then comfortable playing is very important. So my first consideration on a gig lasting say for two one hour sessions is comfort. All the necks and action on my guitars is within something like a millimetre - so that's sorted. Then it comes down to sitting or standing. You want something that balances and doesn't do that nose dive thing most bass guitars do - the neck wants to drop all the time and you kind of support it with your left hand. (Modern built guitars seem to do that more than old ones. ) So balance is more important standing than sitting where you can sort of adjust in the seat. Controls - do you know where they are and what they do - I am constantly surprised at how many players don't really know the knobs and can't adjust on the fly whilst playing.

    Only after all the above would I get onto tone. And you knwo, in my experience of playing for 50+ years, I think you can pretty much make a guitar and amp pretty much sound like ant combination in the middle 80% zone of guitar tone. There are some extremes - but mostly you can make the combination sound like what you want.

    But lastly there is "theatre". If you are playing in a well light swing band centre stage, I would suggest there is a requirement to wear a dinner suit and bow tie or something like a brown, double brested suit and tie and a guitar that fits that era. If you areplaying in the "Strictly Come Dancing" band ( in my dreams!) then you are background and in the 'dark' - who knows and who cares what you play? The audience can't see you anyway. And lastly, if you are doing a solo gig where you get to talk to the audience, you can explain what instrument you are playing if you think it looks odd, and you are up and running again with whatever you want to play personally.

    The bottom line in my opinion is that the instrumnet is a bit of a side issue - learning and playing jazzy stuff well is the real challenge. Most great players have been through times when they have been playing instruments that don't fit the jazz ethos - they would probably listen to this conversation with a wry smile of inner wisdom and think - "whatever!"

  48. #97

    User Info Menu

    I have a Highway1 Strat. Set up with a blocked tremolo and medium flats, it produces a very nice jazz tone from the neck PU - not twangy at all.

  49. #98

    User Info Menu

    Of course you can play jazz on a Strat. Over the years, I have owned three. I have a gig next week at which I will be playing a Strat. Stratocasters are lovely guitars--Telecasters, too.

  50. #99

    User Info Menu

    I have an American Deluxe w/S1 switching: In the neck and next-to-neck pickup positions, it is incredibly warm, and I love the variety of tapping the switch w/o having to move the slider all the time. I rarely use mid or bridge pups, by themselves, but always the neck, or neck and mid pickups.

  51. #100

    User Info Menu

    This topic never gets old, so I'll put my two cents in. Stratocasters are awesome jazz guitars, and I don't understand why more jazzers don't play them regularly. My three "go to" guitars I use for jazz are not considered traditional jazz guitars: my Fender Strat, my Fender Telecaster and my Gretsch 5122:

    Fender Stratocaster for Jazz?-imag1063-jpgFender Stratocaster for Jazz?-imag1058-jpgFender Stratocaster for Jazz?-imag0877-jpg

    I like the Strat and Telecaster for their clarity of sound, which I don't quite get with a lot of hollow bodied guitars. I never understood the attitude that you need to have a muffled, boomy sound to play jazz. For example, Wes Montgomery is my favorite guitarist, but I hate the dull, muddy sound he got on his "Guitar On the Go" album. I think a Telecaster or Strat in his hands would have solved that.

    I actually play 10 gauge roundwound strings on my Strat for jazz (never tried flatwounds on a Stratocaster). I get a great jazz sound from using the middle pickup alone, with the tone knob on the guitar rolled down to about a 4, and the treble on the amp set half way. It has a nice dry, woody tone that provides plenty of crisp definition between notes, and sounds plenty "jazzy" to me.

    I also love the Strat and Telecaster for practicing new licks because I find them to be really comfortable and easy guitars to play.
    Last edited by shamu1; 01-01-2015 at 11:32 AM.