Reply to Thread Bookmark Thread
Page 7 of 7 FirstFirst ... 567
Posts 151 to 161 of 161
  1. #151

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by rpjazzguitar
    I used a Mark III on jazz gigs for several years. I once had a player come out of the audience and offer to buy my entire rig.

    There were two problems. One was weight. The other was adjusting it on the fly. If, in the course of gig I wanted just a bit more treble, or something, I might have to adjust every knob on the amp. I'm probably exaggerating, but the controls are very interactive. Once dialed in, it sounded great.
    That's one reason I loved my Mk 1 - it was a lot simpler than the later models. It could be as clean and jazzy as I wanted it, but it also did gain from barely there to bruisin'. Of course, it wasn't called the Mk 1 when I got it because it was the only Boogie at the time. And it did everything I needed for my "serious" amp, so I never had the desire or felt the need to even try any other big league amp.

    This doesn’t mean I didn’t buy any other high power amps. I got a great deal on a new Twin once, so I bought it as a backup…….but I never needed to use it, so it probably played less than a dozen gigs in 20+ years before I sold it.

  2.  

    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #152

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by jim777
    And the Mark IV has the reverb knob on the BACK, which is just plain nutty.
    Mark no-mark was just even nuttier. Presence was on the back too. Along with what they called 'slave': a direct out with an output level adjustment. I still remember the labels. What did they call that gismo that made letters on a peel-and-stick ribbon of plastic?

  4. #153

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by ccroft
    Mark no-mark was just even nuttier. Presence was on the back too. Along with what they called 'slave': a direct out with an output level adjustment. I still remember the labels. What did they call that gismo that made letters on a peel-and-stick ribbon of plastic?
    Mesa Boogie Amps For Jazz-screen-shot-2021-09-21-9-31-07-pm-png

  5. #154

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by ccroft
    Mark no-mark was just even nuttier.
    Nuttiest of all was the way the first Boogies were (allegedly) built. The story is that Randall Smith and his wife built them while sitting naked in their potting shed, stoned out of their minds. I can’t confirm this personally, but it’s been told identically by many people over the years. If it’s anywhere close to being true, it beats anything ever done by Lowell George, Gerry Garcia, and Frank Zappa!

  6. #155

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by nevershouldhavesoldit
    Nuttiest of all was the way the first Boogies were (allegedly) built. The story is that Randall Smith and his wife built them while sitting naked in their potting shed, stoned out of their minds. I can’t confirm this personally, but it’s been told identically by many people over the years. If it’s anywhere close to being true, it beats anything ever done by Lowell George, Gerry Garcia, and Frank Zappa!
    I have never heard that story, but I have played many gigs with a Marin County bass player who is a personal friend of Randy Smith. I have been told that Smith is first and foremost a jazz guitarist. It is one of the ironies of life that a jazz guitarist would make his living making amplifiers for heavy metal guitarists. Life is stranger than fiction indeed!

  7. #156

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by Stringswinger
    I have never heard that story, but I have played many gigs with a Marin County bass player who is a personal friend of Randy Smith. I have been told that Smith is first and foremost a jazz guitarist. It is one of the ironies of life that a jazz guitarist would make his living making amplifiers for heavy metal guitarists. Life is stranger than fiction indeed!
    Here's a quote from Smith himself about the early days of Boogie production:

    "At one point I was returning from my daily exercise of walking up the mountain behind the house with the dogs and swimming (illegally!) in Kent Lake. As I came back down through the redwoods, I could see the girls sitting on the deck, stuffing circuit boards in the sun with their tops off. I just stood there for a couple of minutes realizing that I had achieved the gig-bliss (for me at least!) and I told myself never to stray too far from the contented, productive and creative feeling of those happy times."

    I've never seen any reference to his playing guitar - it's great to hear that he's one of us! He was a drummer in high school, after an earlier start on clarinet and sax (taught by his father, who was a "hotel bandleader" and principal clarinetist in the Oakland Symphony). He's said many times that a major inspiration for the sound of the casacded gain stages he developed was the sax. I find it a curious coincidence that the original inspiration (even used in their early marketing) for the Maestro Fuzz-Tone was the attempt to make the guitar sound more like a bowed instrument, and that both seminal creations found lives in rock rather than the sax- and violin-like roles envisioned by their creators.

    I also find it ironic that we spent the first 30 years of the electric guitar era spending money at an increasing rate on trying to minimize harmonic distortion. Then we devoted the next 40 years spending even more money to put it back

  8. #157

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by jim777
    And the Mark IV has the reverb knob on the BACK, which is just plain nutty.
    The MkV25 still does - one knob for each channel. I've learned to adjust it without looking at it. The reverb is OK live but I prefer a Hardwire RV-7 in the loop at home.

  9. #158

    User Info Menu

    I've had a Mark V combo for almost 2 years now.
    It does take time to tame the many sounds it can produce.

    For jazz, the "fat" setting on Channel 1 is it for me (the manual has all the answers, gotta read it, many many times)
    However, it took me to swap the speaker for a Celestion Cream 90W (it's the alnico high power, and nope, it's not "cream back").
    (I always found the Black Shadow a bit too neutral for my taste)
    That is it... I do love the sound now. I am not a shredder and occasionally go into the Larry Carlton thing and this amp works great for that.
    It's honestly overkill, for the moment, but I am in for the long run with this beast... I do want to give it time.
    Last edited by jazzfrog; 09-27-2021 at 12:03 AM. Reason: typo

  10. #159

    User Info Menu

    Take it with a grain of salt because I'm a newbie jazz player, but I'm using a Fillmore 25 and I think it sounds fantastic for jazz. I appreciate that there's actually a lot of usable range in the reverb control, doesn't get too wet too fast, and the low end is strong but clear and articulate. Pretty powerful EQ in general.

  11. #160

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by IanW
    Take it with a grain of salt because I'm a newbie jazz player, but I'm using a Fillmore 25 and I think it sounds fantastic for jazz. I appreciate that there's actually a lot of usable range in the reverb control, doesn't get too wet too fast, and the low end is strong but clear and articulate. Pretty powerful EQ in general.

  12. #161

    User Info Menu

    Most boogie players have what I call the 'boogie bend'.... they're always bending over to tweak the amp