View Poll Results: Which one for jazz?

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  • Deluxe

    9 5.59%
  • Deluxe Reverb

    77 47.83%
  • Princeton

    10 6.21%
  • Princeton Reverb

    65 40.37%
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Posts 76 to 84 of 84
  1. #76

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    It probably depends on the room/crowd size of the gigs you do.

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    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #77

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    Quote Originally Posted by Woody Sound
    It probably depends on the room/crowd size of the gigs you do.
    …. and the volume of the drummer!

  4. #78

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    Quote Originally Posted by Little Jay
    …. and the volume of the drummer!
    This cannot be over-emphasized! The highest highs, the lowest lows and the strongest mids come from the drum set, mostly at 90 degrees from the other instruments. A bandshell will improve the mix, but they are vanishingly rare.

  5. #79

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    Quote Originally Posted by citizenk74
    The highest highs, the lowest lows and the strongest mids come from the drum set.
    I gotta be honest - I’ve gotten more of the lowest lows from drummers than the highest highs.


  6. #80

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    Drummerless bands are few and far between, and virtually unknown in rock. This is a pity.

  7. #81

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    I'm thinking about getting one of the TM Twin Reverbs and moving my 70+ pound Mark IV combo. The idea of a 2x12 that's 85 pounds, sounds just like a Twin, and can be overdriven at 1 Watt if I want (and weighs 33 pounds....) is very appealing. I have a modeler already (a Fractal AX8 pedal) so I think I'd be set for life, honestly. The Mk IV is a great sounding amp, though it can be a PITA to setup given the options, but it's 70+ pounds easy and frankly too heavy to want to move.

  8. #82

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    Quote Originally Posted by jim777
    I'm thinking about getting one of the TM Twin Reverbs and moving my 70+ pound Mark IV combo. The idea of a 2x12 that's 85 pounds, sounds just like a Twin, and can be overdriven at 1 Watt if I want (and weighs 33 pounds....) is very appealing. I have a modeler already (a Fractal AX8 pedal) so I think I'd be set for life, honestly. The Mk IV is a great sounding amp, though it can be a PITA to setup given the options, but it's 70+ pounds easy and frankly too heavy to want to move.
    TM Twin Reverb makes a lot of sense, especially compared to a Mk IV. I sold mine a few months ago to a very happy fellow in the NJ. area.
    I loved that amp, but couldn't manage its weight any longer.

  9. #83

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    I just took delivery of a Louis Electric Columbia Reverb, which is Lou's take on a vintage blackface Princeton circuit. There are differences though. The biggest being that it has a Mids control, which is fantastic. It's also got a 12" speaker and is 18 watts with 6v6s. It can take 6L6s, which would give you 28 watts. I think mine is plenty loud for most situations with the 6v6 set. It is such a great sounding amp for jazz. A more powerful vintage sounding Princeton with a Mid control...win win.

  10. #84

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    Quote Originally Posted by joebloggs13
    I just took delivery of a Louis Electric Columbia Reverb, which is Lou's take on a vintage blackface Princeton circuit. There are differences though. The biggest being that it has a Mids control, which is fantastic. It's also got a 12" speaker and is 18 watts with 6v6s. It can take 6L6s, which would give you 28 watts. I think mine is plenty loud for most situations with the 6v6 set. It is such a great sounding amp for jazz. A more powerful vintage sounding Princeton with a Mid control...win win.
    I have a similar, maybe the Bay Area version, a Fat Jimmy Gigmaster 20, similar wattage, with a negative feedback control. Princeton size with a 12" speaker, 6V6's. Very nice sounding amp, no middle control but the circuit is a bit tweaked with brown era attributes, so not purely a Princeton. A bit fuller sounding than the Fender BF circuit.