View Poll Results: Which one for jazz?

Voters
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  • Deluxe

    9 5.59%
  • Deluxe Reverb

    77 47.83%
  • Princeton

    10 6.21%
  • Princeton Reverb

    65 40.37%
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Posts 51 to 75 of 84
  1. #51

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    Quote Originally Posted by DMgolf66
    I'm a home player and was considering upgrading from my 1994 Blues Junior. Currently play a Eastman 503 and a ES-125. Was looking at this deluxe as I like the custom color, haha. I know little about speakers, but it looks like its the Jensen speaker is described as "the crunchy goodness of a Jensen speaker". Doesnt sound too jazzy to me. Is there a speaker that folks like more in this amp?
    Fender '65 Reissue Deluxe Reverb Limited Edition 2017 | Reverb
    To get the Fender to sound like a jazz amp (much flatter frequency curve), on the channel you are using start off by setting the bright switch "off", setting both treble and bass controls all the way down to "1", plugging your guitar into the #2 input jack (-6dB), setting the amp volume about "4", and bringing up the guitar volume just until you reach your playing level... that should sound good for jazz.

  2.  

    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #52

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    As far as which amp goes, I think it depends on which guitar you are using. If you are using an archtop, I recommend the Princeton. The 10" speaker is a winner when you are using an L5, ES175, etc.

    If you are using a ES335, Strat, Tele, etc., then I prefer the Deluxe. Those guitars work well with the 12" speaker.

    Hope this helps.

    FWIW, I have owned and played both amps over the years.

  4. #53

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    Quote Originally Posted by Greentone
    As far as which amp goes, I think it depends on which guitar you are using. If you are using an archtop, I recommend the Princeton. The 10" speaker is a winner when you are using an L5, ES175, etc.

    If you are using a ES335, Strat, Tele, etc., then I prefer the Deluxe. Those guitars work well with the 12" speaker.

    Hope this helps.

    FWIW, I have owned and played both amps over the years.
    100% agree.

  5. #54

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    I love the WGS et65 in the DR. Have another one in a cab that I use with a Ceriatone OTS and a Suhr Badger 18. Just got a Dr.Z Remedy...I'll probably dig it with that too. It seems to do most things really well.

  6. #55

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    How about a Vox AC15 instead?

  7. #56

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    My favorite of the reissues is 68 custom Princeton. Second favorite is 68 custom Deluxe Reverb. Followed by 65 Deluxe Reverb and 65 Princeton. Unfortunately 65 Princeton (my least favorite of the reissues) is what I have.
    Originals would be a different story of course.

  8. #57

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    I like neither of them, I wish they had midrange knobs like my Vintage Sound 35sc does and the Fender Twin does. That said if I had to choose between the two, I'd go with the Deluxe Reverb. The 65' reissues have less bass frequencies than the 65' reissue Princeton and I can get a sound I'm happy with if I'm really gunning for great tone in regards to gear. I should find a way to put a nickname as "all about that no bass" or "not about that bass".

  9. #58
    How come the Pro Jr doesn't get more love? Low wattage. 10" speaker. Clean enough for small gigs and a bit of grit when you want some.

  10. #59

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    Quote Originally Posted by SandChannel
    How come the Pro Jr doesn't get more love? Low wattage. 10" speaker. Clean enough for small gigs and a bit of grit when you want some.
    Because Pro Jr is still in the stage 1 of the guitarist's Fender appreciation cycle:
    1- Initial production
    2- Lack of interest.
    3- Discontinuation
    4 - Re-discovery by a hip artist
    5- Bandwagon
    6- Increase in demand in the vintage/used market
    7- Further increase in vintage value
    8- Fender reissue

    Of course reissues will be considered shit, but the stage 1 Pro Jr's will have all the mojo one ever wants from an amp.

  11. #60
    Quote Originally Posted by Tal_175
    4 - Re-discovery by a hip artist
    Paging Julian Lage or John Mayer.

  12. #61

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    Quote Originally Posted by SandChannel
    Paging Julian Lage or John Mayer.
    Julian Lage uses Champ, I don't think he is known to use Pro Jr:
    Julian Lage's Gear - Jazz Apparatus

    Also going up the stages too quickly can prove fatal.

  13. #62
    I am pretty sure Lage uses a Champ as well. I was just trying to think of guitar players that could radically drive up the interest in any particular piece of gear. Those two seem to have pretty strong followings among guitar players.

  14. #63

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    Quote Originally Posted by SandChannel
    I am pretty sure Lage uses a Champ as well. I was just trying to think of guitar players that could radically drive up the interest in any particular piece of gear. Those two seem to have pretty strong followings among guitar players.
    Oh I see. Yeah. Pro Jr is sort of in the budget amp category. Discontinuation is a must for it to ever become hip IMO.

  15. #64

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    I used to gig with a Pro Jr (first year, tweed with the original blue frame Eminence alnico magnet 10" speaker). It was an amazing amp.

    I say this as someone who has owned and played virtually every kind of tweed, blackface and silverface Fender amp you can think of.

    I would have this amp yet but a national touring band heard it and bought it from me. The lead guitarist subsequently toured with it and recorded several albums with it. He mainly played slide on a reissue of a SG/Les Paul into the amp.

    Now, if you really want to talk about low-wattage Pro amps, let's talk about the early-50s 20-watt 5C5 Pro with the Jensen 15" speaker. _There's_ an amp!

  16. #65
    I have a newer Pro Jr IV. They are back to using Tweed again and they look as cool as they sound. I think Zinky designed the original Pro Jr so they have a bit of their own thing going on compared to your standard Blackface-type circuit. The big difference between this current Pro Jr and the last model (III) is that there is more of a taper on the volume pot so that it doesn't go from clean to dirty with a millimeter of sweep from left to right. The knob allows for more control/variety over the gain stage (volume). I dig it a lot. Plus, it is light and I have always had a soft spot for ten inch speakers.

  17. #66

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    I owned two early Blues Jr amps and the above-mentioned Pro Jr. There is no comparison between them. The Pro Jr simply blows the Blues Jr way out of the water. I know, different amp for a different purpose, some will say. However, I rigorously put these amps through their paces under all kinds of situations, in all kinds of genres. For everything from blues to rock to jazz, the Pro Jr was the winner.

    With archtops, semiacoustics, solid-bodies, you name it--you just could not embarrass the little Pro Jr. OTOH, the Blues Jr (a serviceable amp) could sound kinda wimpy and doinky when you pushed it.

    SandChannel's observation about Zinky's "own thing" seems right on, to me.

  18. #67
    Quote Originally Posted by Greentone
    I used to gig with a Pro Jr (first year, tweed with the original blue frame Eminence alnico magnet 10" speaker).
    The current Pro Jr amps are using reissues of the alnico Jenson P10R. I quite like it - although it is still breaking in a bit. Have you played the Jenson? I am wondering how it compares with the Emi blue frames. If I remember, there were two different Eminence blue frames - one that was rated for 20w with a paper bobbin and the other was rated at 30w with a Kapton voice coil. I have a feeling that the first year Pro Jr had the latter 30w speaker, but older Fenders had the 20w speakers. That all said, I think Eminence was trying to make a speaker that sounded like a Jenson, so maybe it has come full circle.

  19. #68

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    I use a Princeton, but I'd move up to a deluxe if I needed the power. Tone is very similar, but the weight and size of the Princeton is nicer. I like the Brown Princetons, even though they don't have reverb, because they seem to have more umph, headroom, and respond to your playing more (due to the fixed bias maybe?). The tremolo on them is unbeatable. No reverb, but you put a Strymon Flint in front of it and you wouldn't know the difference between that and a Fender tank in a blind test.

    Julian Lage uses both, and I can see why. It's really just a matter of venue size because both sound similar/great.

  20. #69

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    I have gigged deluxe reverbs many times, but I never had a Princeton until fairly recently. My Princeton has an upgraded speaker, so a bit more headroom. So I recently borrowed a friend's 70s deluxe reverb for a gig, also with a bigger speaker. As most friends that have both amps,I thought there wasn't that much of a difference in volume, just a bit more headroom with the deluxe. You could compensate with amp placement and careful playing. I really can't decide if it's worth buying a deluxe also for a bigger amp, or stay with the princeton only and get a light weight solid state for louder gigs. Cause I know I won't want to carry a heavy fender around (like the vibrolux or the pro reverb), and fender is pretty much the sounds I like for an amp.. Choices, choices..

  21. #70

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    Quote Originally Posted by Greentone
    I owned two early Blues Jr amps and the above-mentioned Pro Jr. There is no comparison between them. The Pro Jr simply blows the Blues Jr way out of the water. I know, different amp for a different purpose, some will say. However, I rigorously put these amps through their paces under all kinds of situations, in all kinds of genres. For everything from blues to rock to jazz, the Pro Jr was the winner.

    With archtops, semiacoustics, solid-bodies, you name it--you just could not embarrass the little Pro Jr. OTOH, the Blues Jr (a serviceable amp) could sound kinda wimpy and doinky when you pushed it.

    SandChannel's observation about Zinky's "own thing" seems right on, to me.
    thats odd I've got an early tweed Bjr ....
    pits really punchy , used to be house guitar
    at a regular jam session, and lots of guitarists
    tried to buy it off me !

    pro jnr is the same power stage I believe ....

  22. #71

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    Quote Originally Posted by JazzPadd
    Also regret letting mine go.
    I've let two go and really really regret regret it it. Next one's never leaving.

  23. #72

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    I traded my 65 Princeton for a 65 Deluxe Reverb. My Princeton had a 12inch alnico speaker that I didn't like (Bordeaux model). I first went for a 68 Deluxe Reverb but it was very very noisy. So I swapped it for a 65. I can actually get 68 sounds out the 65 with by pushing the lower mids with an EQ pedal when I want to. Deluxe Reverb has a more ambient sound than Princeton. Princeton is a bit more focused.

  24. #73

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tal_175
    Because Pro Jr is still in the stage 1 of the guitarist's Fender appreciation cycle:
    1- Initial production
    2- Lack of interest.
    3- Discontinuation
    4 - Re-discovery by a hip artist
    5- Bandwagon
    6- Increase in demand in the vintage/used market
    7- Further increase in vintage value
    8- Fender reissue

    Of course reissues will be considered shit, but the stage 1 Pro Jr's will have all the mojo one ever wants from an amp.
    Regarding point 4 - don't know if this guy qualifies as 'hip' or not -

    Jeff Beck's Fender Pro Junior III 15-Watt 1x10 Guitar Combo Amp | Equipboard(R)

  25. #74

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    So now that there has been some time passed.How id the TMDR measuring up and whats the cheap alternative to a DR?

  26. #75

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    Sales levels remain high. Satisfaction seems to be common, particularly after the reverb and bright cap software updates. Still lots of posts on the 300+ page sequence over at the Gear Page....
    I've been playing mine for 18 months and remain delighted. Sounds are remarkably close to the original and the other benefits (5 levels of power attenuation, XLR out, 3 IR profiles, minimum weight....) make it an excellent amp in its own right.
    Criticisms regularly raised are that Fender should have given it more voices like a modelling amp (but that isn't what the amp is designed for), that it doesn't have tubes (can be a gamestopper for some), or that it is not a sound a particular person likes (but that is true of any amp).