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  1. #101

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    $1,200 sounds about right to me. If you're going to have an old Fender amp you also need a qualified amp tech. It will almost certainly need some maintenance sooner or later. The speakers are replacements so expect to have to replace them, although you never know. You may love them. You'll want it gone over to have caps and tubes checked, and to have pots and jacks cleaned. Whatever the purchase price may be, don't expect that to be the total cost.

    But these are great amps and I wouldn't discourage you. They are heavy. They have enough power. And they're about 50 years old. And they sound magnificent when they're right. Good luck with your decision.

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    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #102

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    I passed on Silverface about 10 years ago. Same price from what I recall. In great condition. From what I recall I passed mainly on the headroom. I recall they could break up fairly early. Smaller power and output transformers as reported by Fender Guru website. ( Keep in mind I was not tuned into lower gain preamp tubes to deal with early breakup more headroom.)

  4. #103

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    They are just great amps. If you gig and in need of a loud fender amp, it really comes down to sound preference between the Vibrolux Reverb and the Deluxe Reverb, as they are manageable in weight and more powerful than the Princeton Reverb.

    Some good info here:
    BF/SF Vibrolux Reverb | fenderguru.com

  5. #104

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    FWIW, I got a '76 a few months ago for $1200. It's maybe a little cleaner than one in the OP, with no mods. I would think $1000-$1100 for that one.
    They're great amps! I think you'll be happy with it.

  6. #105

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    Mine has no discernible breakup even at painfully loud levels. I do have newer speakers and a solid-state rectifier in it, but no other mods that I'm aware of. I turn it on now and then, just to check, then go back to using the cabinet with my solid-state head. I like the sound of the dual speakers, but the small head is much more convenient and I can get almost the same sound. I wouldn't think of taking it out of the practice room because it's so big and heavy. I bought it about 25 years ago from a pawnshop, a very good deal at the time, and I could move it on the casters that were already installed. The casters have been removed, so it's pretty much immobile now. I have no idea about the value, since I've never tried to sell it, nor even looked at the current prices.

  7. #106

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    Dear All,


    Recently my beloving amp started to be very noisy. This video presents the problem:





    I'm sorry for the mess in the room - the corona virus quarantine triggered some postponed repairs .


    What might be the problem with the amp? Is it necessary to replace the tubes for new ones? Maybe this noise comes from the electrical installation in my flat (switchin' the grounding didn't help at all)? What are your opinions?


    Best wishes,
    Marcin

  8. #107

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    Are the outlets in your flat grounded?

    When’s the last time the power caps (filter caps), kathode caps and coupling caps, were changed?

    Is the bias correct? Bias cap still healthy?When was the bias cap changed?

    Some testing can be done:

    Pull speaker and reverb cables out and plug back in a couple of times to clean any corrosion or oxidation from the contacts.

    Pull all the preamp tubes, including phase shifter. Turn amp on. Still noisy? Then it’s a power amp problem. Could be the filter caps, DC-leaking coupling caps, power tubes, rectifier, bias cap, loose tube feet, loose contact sonewhere.... lots of options.

    Quiet with preamp tubes pulled? Then it’s in the preamp. Start putting back the phase shifter tube, then the rest from left to right (seen from the back). If noise strat after placing a tube, replace that tube, if you’re lucky it’s a bad preamp-tube.
    Last edited by Little Jay; 03-29-2020 at 10:27 AM.

  9. #108

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    Sometimes a bad or dirty potmeter can cause noise. Turn all of them up and down a couple of times to see if that makes a difference or causes more noise even.

  10. #109

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    Judging by the video it’s a phase inverter tube or power amp problem, since it’s in both channels.

    Try putting a fresh 12at7 in V6 - or if you don’t have one, take the 12ax7 from V1 and put it in V6 (won’t hurt anything) while using the Vibrato channel and see if the noise stops.

    I am no expert, but it sounds a bit as if the AC-filtering (partly) fails. Rectifier - it’s a tube in the Vibrolux iirc - of filtercaps or loose conection/broken solder joint in that circuit I what I would look for.

  11. #110

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    Seems quiet with nothing plugged in. The cable seems to be picking up interference. There will always be some tube hiss, that's unavoidable with tubes. What is the cable connected to? If nothing, that's probably the problem.

  12. #111

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    Thank you All. It sounds like I need to go to a technician...

  13. #112

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    Quote Originally Posted by chemiorro
    Thank you All. It sounds like I need to go to a technician...
    YUP! Nothing works better than an O'scope for debugging noise whether it's from power filtration or in the signal chain.

    A trip to a decent tech for an estimate will save you a lot of time and money.

  14. #113

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    In most cases a tube problem. BadPower tubes or/and bad rectifier tube.

  15. #114

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    You did right to post the sound of it - that noise sounds just like live unterminated CA-TV coax.

    Look for a wall mounted face plate where you would connect to the TV/internet and see if it is unused or not currently connected to something. Unterminatated means not connected to something (doesn't matter if the connected thing is on or off).

    A live but unconnected CA-TV coax cable will be very noisy like that when your rig is close to it (meaning close to the unterminated coax cable in the wall).

    Try these steps:

    1] Move the amp - the range of this kind of interference is only about 10 feet from the cable (including within the wall, which means in an apartment it may be your neighbors cable service routing).

    2] If you have an unused live cable outlet connection, find the splitter that divides the signal to multiple rooms/apartments. Disconnect each drop one at a time and verify which are in use and which are not - disconnect those that are not in use (depending on your situation, in a home the splitter will typically be up in the attic, in an apartment get help and permission).

  16. #115

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    I've seen (heard) that noise many times, often caused by a cable being connected to the amp without being connected to anything on the other end, and just lying on the floor. Unbalanced and unterminated, it picks up and transmits interference. I couldn't see in the video whether the cable was terminated on the other end. If it's the cable, shorting it at the far end should remove the noise. That's how noiseless plugs work.

  17. #116

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    I did not even consider an unconnected cable!

    Did you do the test with just a cable, no guitar connected? Sure, that would cause that noise!

  18. #117

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    Alright, big update here, for anyone who cares. The guy who had the above amp, the SF, didn't sell it to me. I was pretty disappointed. However, things happen for a reason. Long story short, I got a '66 Vibrolux, BF, from the original owner, at a rock bottom price and just had it fixed up. I am very, very excited, and wanted to share some pics here. Check it out.
    Attached Images Attached Images Fender Vibrolux Silverface Reverb-2020-03-26-14-12-04-jpg Fender Vibrolux Silverface Reverb-2020-03-26-14-12-13-jpg Fender Vibrolux Silverface Reverb-2020-03-26-14-13-57-jpg Fender Vibrolux Silverface Reverb-img_20200330_170229531-jpg Fender Vibrolux Silverface Reverb-img_20200330_171706384-jpg Fender Vibrolux Silverface Reverb-img_20200330_172506959-jpg Fender Vibrolux Silverface Reverb-img_20200330_173536719-jpg Fender Vibrolux Silverface Reverb-img_20200330_175657356-jpg 

  19. #118

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    Score! My second favorite Fender amp of all time! Let us know how it sounds! I used to gig with one of those back in the 70s. Sweet! Happy NAD!

  20. #119

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    Did you ask why he took the Jensens out and installed JBL's?

  21. #120

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    Not specifically. Assuming it was an upgrade he wanted to make, to be louder, give more headroom. I have the original speakers too. Amp tech said one of the originals was weak, the other reconed, suggested leaving JBLs, called them solid.

    Question - what is the weight difference between these JBLs and other possible speakers? Tech said swapping them out would only reduce amp weight by a few pounds. Thoughts? Rather, overall thoughts on the JBLs?

    Picking up from tech Thursday.

    Thanks.
    Last edited by crhyner; 04-01-2020 at 07:21 AM.

  22. #121

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    If you like clean, those JBLs will be great. They are known for clean and punchy tone through almost the whole rotation of your amp’s volume control. They’re rated at 150w power handling each. I’ll bet they sound great. But, if you like the edge of breakup to be lower on your volume, a diff set of speakers may be in order.

    Although your speakers may be an earlier model, here’s a spec sheet that seems to fit:
    Fender Vibrolux Silverface Reverb-06bd6bb4-e9a7-41c8-a31a-a87978c8f90f-jpg Fender Vibrolux Silverface Reverb-235e871f-5eaa-4494-87d6-f1a915805670-jpg

  23. #122

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    Great amp! Of all of the Fender black face and silver face amps I have played, the Vibrolux Reverb is a favorite of mine. It just kills with Gibson-type guitars. So, if you are thinking of using, say, a ES-335, ES-175, etc., this amp will really reward you.

  24. #123

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    Quote Originally Posted by wintermoon
    Did you ask why he took the Jensens out and installed JBL's?
    He wanted to add @12 pounds to the weight of the amp!

  25. #124

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    The test was done with ES175 connected. When walking around the flat the noise change. Pauln gave me the idea that it can be some problem with the electric installation in my flat. I will make sure of that when taking the amp to some other place.
    Thank you All!

  26. #125

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    Good people,

    I recently picked up a 1966 Vibrolux and I love it. One small problem - the reverb tank is noisy. Kind of blips on its own, some hard notes crackle a bit. Attaching a video of the issue here.

    What's the solution? A new reverb tank is cheap, right? Easy to replace? Can I fix this? Will replacing it affect the integrity of the amp? I think the tank in there now is not original, and I have the original saved in storage (along with original speakers).

  27. #126

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    How do you know it's the tank?

  28. #127

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    that's more likely a tube issue...than an actual spring issue...check your reverb send and recovery tubes V3 & V4..


    Blackface model tube layout (Seen from behind, V1 is to the right side)

    V1 12ax7 = Preamp normal channel
    V2 12ax7 = Preamp vibrato channel
    V3 12at7 = Reverb send
    V4 12ax7 = 1/2 Reverb recovery and 1/2 gain stage for vibrato channel
    V5 12ax7 = Vibrato
    V6 12at7 = Phase inverter
    V7 6L6 = Power tube #1
    V8 6L6 = Power tube #2
    V9 GZ34 = Rectifier tube


    cheers

  29. #128

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    Agreed NA, sounds like a bad preamp tube

  30. #129

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    Hahhhhh...basic stuff. Clean the RCA jacks/plugs that connect the chassis to the reverb pan. They may be ld, dirty, oxidized, broken, and just plain no good! Then, check the tube(s) for reverb send and return. (And their sockets) plus the pedal jacks. If not here, get a new pan, and while you're at it, get the 3 spring unit, for a more lush reverb, if you're into that sound. Otherwise a 2 spring is adequate.

    Hope this helps.

  31. #130

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    OK, am a step ahead of you guys, sort of.

    I already figured out which tube does what and moved some things around...no difference there.

    The reason I think it's the pan is because the tech did all the guts stuff - capacitors, etc. That should be all good. When I turn the reverb off, the amp doesn't make this sound at all, none - totally quiet. The second I turn the reverb on, it's there.

    Also, when the reverb is on, and I tap the reverb pan, I get an extreme version of the noise I'm hearing. So, that's why I think it's the pan.

    And another good point, I already did take the pan out, try to tighten the cables, etc. Is there a better way to clean the connections?

    So...back to my original thing. Does it matter what kind of pan I get? This is like a $30 fix, right?

  32. #131

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    Also, the cables could be a good guess...mine are OLD. If I am just going to replace the cables, which ones do I buy...generic RCA cables?

  33. #132

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    Yes. Generic are fine. Make sure they are long enough - sounds obvious right? Not so. If you reverse the direction of the pan, you need longer cables. Why would you reverse the pan??? Because sometimes the new pan ( with a new cover) doesn't pop right in the same way ???? Then there is strapping the cables out of the way. Believe me, done this a few times.

    Take the existing cables, gently pull them out and in a few times ( having fun ??) and maybe gently twist them in the sockets to get the contact surfaces clean. Should help but if there is noise or they short out, you know you need new cables. They DO NOT last forever, and your amp is old - but great no doubt.

  34. #133

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    Sounds like a microphonic preamp tube.

  35. #134

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    I appreciate it, guys. I think I am right, though, that it's the tank.

    A really helpful guy, Frank, at Amp Repair Parts - Powered by Studio Sound Electronics had do the following...

    "On the back panel of the amp, unplug the cable that goes to the jack labelled "Reverb Input". Leave the other cables connected. See if you still have the noise when you turn up the reverb control. If it is gone, the tank is not likely to be the problem.

    If the noise is still there, unplug the cable that goes to the "Reverb Output" jack (keep track of which cable goes to which jack, since you now have two similar looking cables unplugged). That should kill the noise, and the tank is a very likely culprit.

    If the noise, however, is still there with both cables unplugged - it's certainly not the tank - the tank is now completely disconnected."

    When I unplugged the reverb input to the amp, the noise was there. When I unplugged the reverb output jack, no noise.


    Also, how's this - I realized that it doesn't even matter what volume the amp's channel volume is on, could be 0, and the noise is still present with the tank attached.

    -

    So, I bought a new tank, he told me which one to get. Hopefully that's the end of it. Will install in a few days.

    Charlie

  36. #135

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    ‘66 vibrolux. Nice! Good luck with the reverb tank. I have that amp’s big brother (‘66 Super Reverb) and the only word I can come up with to describe it is ‘magical’. It sounds like heaven. These old amps are worth maintaining. Just something magical about the look, the sound, the glowing of tubes and even the smell of these magic old contraptions.

    Roli

  37. #136

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    I 100% agree. I love the look, the feel of the vacuum tubes glowing, the warmth, the machinery. Something totally alluring.

    In my rock band too, always just loved the tube amps. Had a Marshall TSL 60 head...again, the tubes, there's a mystique...

  38. #137

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    Quote Originally Posted by crhyner
    I appreciate it, guys. I think I am right, though, that it's the tank.

    A really helpful guy, Frank, at Amp Repair Parts - Powered by Studio Sound Electronics had do the following...

    "On the back panel of the amp, unplug the cable that goes to the jack labelled "Reverb Input". Leave the other cables connected. See if you still have the noise when you turn up the reverb control. If it is gone, the tank is not likely to be the problem.

    If the noise is still there, unplug the cable that goes to the "Reverb Output" jack (keep track of which cable goes to which jack, since you now have two similar looking cables unplugged). That should kill the noise, and the tank is a very likely culprit.

    If the noise, however, is still there with both cables unplugged - it's certainly not the tank - the tank is now completely disconnected."

    When I unplugged the reverb input to the amp, the noise was there. When I unplugged the reverb output jack, no noise.


    Also, how's this - I realized that it doesn't even matter what volume the amp's channel volume is on, could be 0, and the noise is still present with the tank attached.

    So, I bought a new tank, he told me which one to get. Hopefully that's the end of it. Will install in a few days.

    Charlie
    I couldn't quite follow the troubleshooting that's already been done, but I had a similar problem with a simple solution -- once I figured out what was wrong.

    Crackling related to the reverb on an original Reverberocket.

    Tried a bunch of things and spent a bunch of money. Eventually, I soldered in some new parts (following a recommendation from a guy on the internet) and, in the course of doing so, noticed that wiggling a certain wire reproduced the problem.

    I followed the wire. What it turned out to be, making a long story short, is the little wings on the RCA jacks weren't making good contact with the reverb tank. The solution was bending them slightly with a pair of needlenose pliers.

    Bear in mind, I had pressed them in to make sure they were seated tightly many times. They were pushed all the way in, but the little wings were not spread adequately.

    That was all it was. Re-tubing, new parts etc etc, was all irrelevant. Ampeg built those amps like tanks. When something goes wrong, it is often something minor.

  39. #138

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    Replacing a reverb tank is an easy job, but before doing that I'd unplug the RCA jacks and hit both male and female sides with Deoxit or QD electronics cleaner. Spittiness is often a result of crud build-up. Just spray all jack connections and work the jacks in, out, and rotating, and see if that doesn't fix the problem?

  40. #139

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    Replaced the tank today, noise gone. Sounds perfect. The end!

  41. #140
    I have a BF ‘66 VR I’ve owned since 1979. For me it’s the perfect combination of weight, size, power and tone. There are some amps I like better for specific jobs, but for me there isn’t any amp that can do so many things so well.

    A band would have to get really loud to overwhelm it. My experience is that you’re normally miked through a PA once you get to that volume.

  42. #141

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    Quote Originally Posted by NCjazzpicker
    I have a BF ‘66 VR I’ve owned since 1979. For me it’s the perfect combination of weight, size, power and tone. There are some amps I like better for specific jobs, but for me there isn’t any amp that can do so many things so well.

    A band would have to get really loud to overwhelm it. My experience is that you’re normally miked through a PA once you get to that volume.