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  1. #51
    joaopaz Guest
    About the electronics:

    Hi guys,
    I recorded this video yesterday with my Epiphone (it's a written solo for Matt Warnock's place, not an improv although I "edited" on a few places).

    I've been chasing a certain tone I hear on some Gibson ES-175 recordings; while I like my tone now, that's not it, yet (not really worried if I don't get there but I might swap a few things along the way).

    Usually I play with the pickups fairly close to the strings; so here I backed the neck PU a bit (more on the treble side), adjusted the height of the polepieces, etc.

    On the video I'm playing with the volume at 7 and the tone at 3.
    That's where problems start. As soon as I roll the volume back, a lot of noise comes in, I need to have the hands on the strings all the time, and still...

    There are other reported things about the bridge volume and tone knobs popping in suddenly, say, from 2 to 3.

    I've watched this on some of my other guitars with pots of less quality so I'm assuming it's the case here.

    So I'm going to change everything but the pickups.

    Question about the pots (perhaps I should post this elsewhere):
    Do you guys know what pots are the correct ones for a Gibson ES-175? I heard something about all Gibsons having 300K... is this for the whole 175 line or may be other pots on different models?
    (I must say I know very little about electronics)

    The thing is, this guitar is a sweet! It deserves the best


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    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #52

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    Gibson usually uses 300k ohm pots, or has traditionally. I'm not sure about recent production, but it's probably the same. If it ain't broke, don't fix it.

    Adding a treble bleed circuit helps with the abrupt rolloff, and tames the tone change from the volume control. That's one of the first things I did to mine, and I do it to most of my guitars. Some people like using the volume control for tone changes, though. If you want finer control of the volume, get audio taper pots instead of linear taper. I generally keep my tone control at 10, and the volume at around 7 or so, but that's just me.

  4. #53
    joaopaz Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by sgosnell
    Gibson usually uses 300k ohm pots, or has traditionally. I'm not sure about recent production, but it's probably the same. If it ain't broke, don't fix it.

    Adding a treble bleed circuit helps with the abrupt rolloff, and tames the tone change from the volume control. That's one of the first things I did to mine, and I do it to most of my guitars. Some people like using the volume control for tone changes, though. If you want finer control of the volume, get audio taper pots instead of linear taper. I generally keep my tone control at 10, and the volume at around 7 or so, but that's just me.
    Great info, thanks

    Do you confirm the noise/hum coming in as soon as reducing the volume from 10 to any other value? Or did your changes erradicate that?

  5. #54

    User Info Menu

    No, I've had no hum or noise at all. Hum when not touching the strings usually means a poor or no ground. Either a wire has broken inside, or the ground wire to the tailpiece isn't making good contact.

  6. #55
    joaopaz Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by sgosnell
    No, I've had no hum or noise at all. Hum when not touching the strings usually means a poor or no ground. Either a wire has broken inside, or the ground wire to the tailpiece isn't making good contact.
    The thing is that it does not happen if I have the volume at 10. Shouldn't that exclude ground issues?
    Thanks!

  7. #56

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    I don't know. I've never seen that happen on any guitar. It could be a faulty pot, that's about all I can think of for a cause.

  8. #57

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    Have always wanted a blond ES-175 type box ever since I decided to pursue jazz guitar, but didn't want to spend $750+ on some nicer lower level non-Gibson ones. Saw the threads about the Epi ES-175 Premium with the Gibson PUs too late to get a natural one, but decided to go ahead on the black one (which was on clearance) figuring it would match my black tele. Happily the "E" logo came off easily and is no longer there. Everything else remains stock for now.

    On a side note, as another poster also experienced with the clearance priced epos, I sadly got one of the unboxed (just jammed in a box with bubble wrap) ones that must have been a display guitar, but since there was no damage other than some hand/finger prints on the body and the price was so great I decided to keep her...great sound and now just need to pair her up to a worthy amp.

    Epiphone ES-175 Owners Club-img_20170120_214700604-jpg
    Last edited by Sundeep; 03-15-2017 at 03:43 AM. Reason: grammatical errors

  9. #58

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by christianm77
    I'm recommending the epis to my student who is looking covetously at my gibbo
    Epiphone all the way! I am a huge fan, had a lot of EPis (Japanese,Chinese,Korean), and I am really love with them! Of course I am using an Epi right now, also.

  10. #59

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by Sundeep
    ... Saw the threads about the Epi ES-175 Premium with the Gibson PUs too late to get a natural one, but decided to go ahead on the black one (which was on clearance) ...
    Your story mirrors mine, Sundeep. Enjoy your guitar.

  11. #60
    joaopaz Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by Sundeep
    Have always wanted a blond ES-175 type box ever since I decided to pursue jazz guitar, but didn't want to spend $750+ on some nicer lower level non-Gibson ones. Saw the threads about the Epi ES-175 Premium with the Gibson PUs too late to get a natural one, but decided to go ahead on the black one (which was on clearance) figuring it would match my black tele. Happily the "E" logo came off easily and is no longer there. Everything else remains stock for now.

    On a side note, as another poster also experienced with the clearance priced epos, I sadly got one of the unboxed (just jammed in a box with bubble wrap) ones that must have been a display guitar, but since there was no damage other than some hand/finger prints on the body and the price was so great I decided to keep her...great sound and now just need to pair her up to a worthy amp.

    Epiphone ES-175 Owners Club-img_20170120_214700604-jpg
    Welcome to the Club, sundeep With yours we have now 12 "registered" Epis .. I must say that yours look gorgeous; at this point I have enough GAS to go out and buy another one one of these days ... just not sure yet if it will be the black or the red one. Both look absolutely gorgeous.

    I haven't stopped playing mine.. it's feeling tight and better. The acoustic sound is pretty amazing! It's not the volume itself but the quality of the tone. I always love when that happens; you may end up mic'ingg both the guitar and the amp for some recordings and it will hold great I'm sure.

    As for the amp, I'm on that same quest - check this thread I started a few days ago, lots of great info there!
    New SS amp for an ES-175 "classic" tone - your choice is?

  12. #61
    joaopaz Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by mrblues
    Epiphone all the way! I am a huge fan, had a lot of EPis (Japanese,Chinese,Korean), and I am really love with them! Of course I am using an Epi right now, also.
    Hey MrBlues, do you have one of these ES-175s?

    I also have a Dot Studio. Did some minor cosmetic changes to it and it's an amazing guitar, really... I like it better than the regular Dot. And it has the unmarked fingerboard... I wish there were a lot more guitars like that.. not dots, no inlays.

  13. #62

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    I agree the more I play it the better it is.
    I would like however to hear from the owners concerning how the bridge base sits on the top?
    On mine it's very sloppy work.. it touches the body top on the extreme ends, and it looks almost twisted.. I suspect that what really makes the contact and connection is NOT the bridge base, but the pins.
    Has anyone tried to sand the bridge flush to the top?
    In a way the Epi sounds just great with that really lightely made, horribly adjusted, bridge base.
    I want to sand it, keeping the pins (you can use an allen wrench to back them and do the work)
    But will this be an improvement on the sound?
    Does the sound come from that very light contact on the top, with the pins transfering most of the vibrations, letting the top freely resonnate?
    I'm very curious to hear from some of you who might have sanded the bridge base flush?

  14. #63
    joaopaz Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by Jx30510
    I agree the more I play it the better it is.
    I would like however to hear from the owners concerning how the bridge base sits on the top?
    On mine it's very sloppy work.. it touches the body top on the extreme ends, and it looks almost twisted.. I suspect that what really makes the contact and connection is NOT the bridge base, but the pins.
    Has anyone tried to sand the bridge flush to the top?
    In a way the Epi sounds just great with that really lightely made, horribly adjusted, bridge base.
    I want to sand it, keeping the pins (you can use an allen wrench to back them and do the work)
    But will this be an improvement on the sound?
    Does the sound come from that very light contact on the top, with the pins transfering most of the vibrations, letting the top freely resonnate?
    I'm very curious to hear from some of you who might have sanded the bridge base flush?
    I will have to double check when I get home but I'm nost sure that on my guitar the bridge sits perfectly on top, following the countour of the body nicely.

    I'm also a violinist and on violins that can be a major issue for sound loss/tone change. When buying violins for my young students who aren't on a 4/4 size yet the bridges always need a fix (or a total replacement) done by a local luthier. Usually we buy chinese instruments for those stages; lately they are producing very nice instruments, really, but things like the bridge or the pegs always need work.

    I reckon that while not as dramatic on a violin the same sound/tone loss may occur, at least on an acoustic level - there for sure. The easy way to fix it would be to put a sheet of sandpaper on the guitar body to follow the belly curve and do the sanding of the bridge on top of that. Just be careful not to round the edges. Violin luthiers never use sandpaper though they always do it with a sharp knife x-acto style.

    If you think that may be one of the pins doing the contact with the guitar's top, check that asap as it would be putting a lot of pressure on a small spot, most surely doing some damage... but you many check that also, I think, just with an allen wrench to raise the pins as you said, and see if the bridge goes down.

    I'd correct that, for sure. You'll gaing in sound, perhaps reduce some vibrations, even some tuning stability...

  15. #64

    User Info Menu

    Thanks for the advice.
    I'm going to sand it correctly flush with the top, and see if it's better..

  16. #65

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    Fitting a bridge base is precision work, and factories don't always have time to do it well. The production line has to keep moving, at least metaphorically. Having a perfectly fitting bridge base should affect the sound for the better. Stew-Mac sells a jig for doing this, but I don't think it's worth the money for one-time use. It is worth it if you do this often. For one time, just make sure to keep the base straight and don't let it tilt. I may be playing Captain Obvious with this, but I wanted to mention it.

  17. #66

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    Well I just did it today. It was quite easy, the classic technique with a piece of sandpaper fitted on the top. It's now perfectly flush on the top.
    I had to open up a bit the holes because the pins wouldn't fit in it. I must have slightly changed the angles of the pins, but it was also pretty easy, because I had the small round file to do the job.
    As a result, there are obvious improvments :

    * playability > a more solid feel and better action.
    I'm feeling this is because the bridge is better aligned to the neck radius. With a lower action the notes ring better and feel less chocked at certain places on the neck (from fret 9 to 12).

    * sound> again a more tight feeling instrument, especially on the E and A strings. More sustain and precision, just better. And the note definition and separation when playing chords is enhanced.
    The acoustic sound is also more solid, like if there was a compressor.

    I don't know if my guitar was especially badly finished in that area, but this quick job really improved the overall impression. It was very good before, but now it's better. I suggest doing it if you observe a gap beetween the bridge plate and the body top.
    Last edited by Jx30510; 03-20-2017 at 04:04 PM.

  18. #67
    joaopaz Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by Jx30510
    Well I just did it today. It was quite easy, the classic technique with a piece of sandpaper fitted on the top. It's now perfectly flush on the top.
    I had to open up a bit the holes because the pins wouldn't fit in it. I must have slightly changed the angles of the pins, but it was also pretty easy, because I had the small round file to do the job.
    As a result, there are obvious improvments :

    * playability > a more solid feel and better action.
    I'm feeling this is because the bridge is better aligned to the neck radius. With a lower action the notes ring better and feel less chocked at certain places on the neck (from fret 9 to 12).

    * sound> again a more tight feeling instrument, especially on the E and A strings. More sustain and precision, just better. And the note definition and separation when playing chords is enhanced.
    The acoustic sound is also more solid, like if there was a compressor.

    I don't know if my guitar was especially badly finished in that area, but this quick job really improved the overall impression. It was very good before, but now it's better. I suggest doing it if you observe a gap beetween the bridge plate and the body top.
    Great news! Glad it worked and thanks for the feedback.
    Now enjoy it !

  19. #68

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    Sounds like the pins just never made it all the way through the holes. That's just poor setup, but not unexpected for a (relatively) cheap factory output. My solution was to back the pins out so that the bridge is no longer pinned, but whatever works...

  20. #69

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    Sounds like the pins just never made it all the way through the holes. That's just poor setup, but not unexpected for a (relatively) cheap factory output. My solution was to back the pins out so that the bridge is no longer pinned, but whatever works... Actually, it's now not pinned because I removed the TOM and replaced the entire bridge with an ebony one, with a split base. That made a big difference in the tone. It's now probably the darkest guitar I have, no longer bright at all.

  21. #70
    joaopaz Guest
    Today I finally took the Epiphone to the guitar tech. We're going to replace the electronics, all but the pickups.

    I took some photos to share here with you guys.

    As expected, aside the pickups, everything inside is what you'd expect on a budget guitar... though we may argue if a close to $900 is still a budget guitar.
    The pots are 500K MIK, the capacitors are average (ceramic?), the wires aren't the best either and the jack input follow the same lines... it didn't even have a dented washer (not sure about the english term for this) so the input jack would get loose and spin easily all the time.

    In spite of that the craftsmanship with those components looked ok.

    The pickups as you'll see are the 57 Classic and have credible stickers and the "patent applied for logo". I'm just mentioning this because there was a bit of a warning sign for me.. the cables coming from the inside of the pickup are the same as used on the rest of the guitar. Perhaps the Gibson USA 57 Classic are all like that... I don't know, perhaps some of you may confirm?
    Also... the bridge pickup is a 57 "plus" Classic; there's no word about it one the Epiphone product page.

    Having said that, I love the sound of the guitar and am anxiously awaiting for its comeback

    I looked into the Gibson website and on both ES-175 models I could find there was no mention of 300K pots...
    ES-175 Figured

    So I'm going these same components on the Epiphone. Only exception will be that I'll use Audio pots on the volumes as well, and not linear ones.

    I'm going also for a bone nut.

    As for the bridge and the tuners for now I'll leave them as is, as I have no complaints. As for the bridge I really like how the guitar resonates and its acoustic tone; and as for the tuners, I want to try these ones first with e proper nut.

    Ok, here's the photos!

    Epiphone ES-175 Owners Club-img_20170325_162004-01-jpgEpiphone ES-175 Owners Club-img_20170325_162014-01-jpgEpiphone ES-175 Owners Club-img_20170325_162312-01-jpgEpiphone ES-175 Owners Club-img_20170325_162320-01-jpgEpiphone ES-175 Owners Club-img_20170325_162413-01-jpg

  22. #71

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    Very instructive, thanks for the pictures.
    That's what I thought, the electronics are far from top notch. The selector on mine is almost ruined, and I can hear the less quality effect on the tone knob. While usable, an upgrade is in my opinion a really good idea

  23. #72

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    One thing that is strange is that normally Gibson 57 Classics have a metal wrapped wire (don't know how you call it in english? "tressé" in french)?

  24. #73

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by Jx30510
    One thing that is strange is that normally Gibson 57 Classics have a metal wrapped wire (don't know how you call it in english? "tressé" in french)?
    Yes, originally the 57 Classics came only with braided wires (all the 57 Classics and burstbuckers in my Gibson guitars have braided wires). This is what made me think that there is also an Asian produced variant of the 57 Classic pickup. But apparently it also comes with plastic coated wire?

  25. #74

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    Oh, and I know that I am a freak, but I replace all chrome/silver nickel pickup ring screws with black ones..... all Asian guitars come with chrome/silver nickel pickup ring screws and to me it just looks cheap. Changing those makes a guitar look much more expensive Epiphone ES-175 Owners Club



    Vs

    Last edited by Little Jay; 03-26-2017 at 07:25 AM.

  26. #75

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jx30510
    One thing that is strange is that normally Gibson 57 Classics have a metal wrapped wire (don't know how you call it in english? "tressé" in french)?
    Yes they normally have a braided shield outside and a black-insulated lead inside.

  27. #76

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    How do these stack up against the Eastman 375s?

  28. #77
    joaopaz Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by Jx30510
    One thing that is strange is that normally Gibson 57 Classics have a metal wrapped wire (don't know how you call it in english? "tressé" in french)?
    Quote Originally Posted by Little Jay
    Yes, originally the 57 Classics came only with braided wires (all the 57 Classics and burstbuckers in my Gibson guitars have braided wires). This is what made me think that there is also an Asian produced variant of the 57 Classic pickup. But apparently it also comes with plastic coated wire?
    Quote Originally Posted by lawson-stone
    Yes they normally have a braided shield outside and a black-insulated lead inside.
    Yes, that's what I thought... perhaps these are assembled in Asia... not sure and don't want, in any way, to say they're advertising one thing and selling another - because on the Epiphone page they're clear about Gibson USA 57 Classic.

    Again, they sound awsome. What my tech said is that he would use the braided shield cable for the most part and would shield a bit better the part of the cable coming out of the pickup.

  29. #78
    joaopaz Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by christianm77
    How do these stack up against the Eastman 375s?
    Do you mean the 372s?
    I can't say, in any case, never played an Eastman - though they look great. They cost what, around 1200/1300? That would put them 400 above the Epiphone, so you'd expect somewhat more attention to detail.

    The thing that, a bit surprisingly, I like a lot about the Epiphone is the finish... it's very thin, and it lets the guitar breathe and resonate nicely. The construction seems to be great, so far I haven't found like poor spot.

    Funny exercise would be... you take all the hardware out of the Epiphone ES-175 Premium and replace it with all the original items that come with VOS 1959 Gibson ES-175. You already have the 57 pickups.... that would put the guitar close to 1000/1100 (don't know the price of the tuners) - which is still 3300 below the Gibson(!)

    I'm not pretending it would be the same thing of course - but it makes you think about it.

  30. #79

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    Joapaz, would you be kind enough to tell if the pots are metric or US size? This is important because the holes are bigger on the top if they are US.
    I'm going the same route as you, going to bring the guitar to my luthier for a hand made bone nut, the guitar deserves it, and going to swap the electronics also.
    I'm doing this because this weekend the jack input just sunk and broke some of the wood on the body. I don't know what happened, just heard a big crack while mooving the guitar and saw the damage.. the jacj must have been stuck somewhere while moving the guitar. I just knew this would happen, that area just seems fragile, and when I got it new there were already small cracks in the finish around the jack input.
    It's no big deal, I'm going to install a metal jack plate there (Les Paul style). I've done it on other archtops and everything is just more solid afterwards, and it doesn't affect the sound at all, obviously.
    So the Epi will be on the bench for a couple of days, but I really think it's good idea to surge the guitar in it's weak points right away (nut, electronics-not the pickups- flimsy jack input area- tuners).
    So can you ask your luthier what are the size of the pots? I'm going to order new pots, but won't have time to dismantle the guitar to check the original ones.
    Thanks in advance!

  31. #80
    joaopaz Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by Jx30510
    Joapaz, would you be kind enough to tell if the pots are metric or US size? This is important because the holes are bigger on the top if they are US.
    I'm going the same route as you, going to bring the guitar to my luthier for a hand made bone nut, the guitar deserves it, and going to swap the electronics also.
    I'm doing this because this weekend the jack input just sunk and broke some of the wood on the body. I don't know what happened, just heard a big crack while mooving the guitar and saw the damage.. the jacj must have been stuck somewhere while moving the guitar. I just knew this would happen, that area just seems fragile, and when I got it new there were already small cracks in the finish around the jack input.
    It's no big deal, I'm going to install a metal jack plate there (Les Paul style). I've done it on other archtops and everything is just more solid afterwards, and it doesn't affect the sound at all, obviously.
    So the Epi will be on the bench for a couple of days, but I really think it's good idea to surge the guitar in it's weak points right away (nut, electronics-not the pickups- flimsy jack input area- tuners).
    So can you ask your luthier what are the size of the pots? I'm going to order new pots, but won't have time to dismantle the guitar to check the original ones.
    Thanks in advance!
    Hi Jx!
    I passed your post along to my guitar tech, this morning, and here's his reply - hope it helps! Let me know ..

    Hi Joao!

    The dimensions that concern here refer only to the shaft diameter. In fact the original hole in the guitar will have to be enlarged because the shaft diameter of the original pot is 7.77mm while the shaft of the CTS is 9.30mm (it is the same procedure as we did in your Gretsch). The measurement differences do not end here, ie all measurements of the CTS potentiometers are in inches, including the number of cutouts where the knob will fit, causing the original knob to not be compatible and will have to be replaced with a new knob, too, in inches!
    If you look here, from my vendor, you will notice that there are always 2 versions for the same knob: in millimeters and inches.
    BOUTONS GIBSON - Fred's Guitar Parts

    About a year ago, Stewmac released a video that accurately and accurately portrays this issue:


    Regards!

  32. #81

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    Thanks very much, and give a big hand shake to your luthier as well!
    So this is forcing us to go to the drill thing .. the classic US/metric hassle
    brrrr.. I might as well go for Alpha pots.. or delay all the thing.
    tell us what the upgrade has impacted the sound

    For my part I've ordered Grover Gr102 tuners, a Graphtec Resomatic NV2 tunomatic, an ebony split bridge base, a Switchcraft jack input and metal jack plate (remember the input jack is wrecked with broken wood), Ernie ball strap locks, and a Es125 style trapeze tailpiece.

    All this for about 180€ which is quite not that much for an overall big upgrade. Some might tell me it will lesser be an Es 175 (tailpiece, tuners, modern TOM), but I really don't care. For me the Premium is an Epiphone, not a Gibson ES175..

    I'm going to try locally a Gibson VOS 59 ES175 this next week. But that's another story...

  33. #82
    joaopaz Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by Jx30510
    Thanks very much, and give a big hand shake to your luthier as well!
    So this is forcing us to go to the drill thing .. the classic US/metric hassle
    brrrr.. I might as well go for Alpha pots.. or delay all the thing.
    tell us what the upgrade has impacted the sound

    For my part I've ordered Grover Gr102 tuners, a Graphtec Resomatic NV2 tunomatic, an ebony split bridge base, a Switchcraft jack input and metal jack plate (remember the input jack is wrecked with broken wood), Ernie ball strap locks, and a Es125 style trapeze tailpiece.

    All this for about 180€ which is quite not that much for an overall big upgrade. Some might tell me it will lesser be an Es 175 (tailpiece, tuners, modern TOM), but I really don't care. For me the Premium is an Epiphone, not a Gibson ES175..

    I'm going to try locally a Gibson VOS 59 ES175 this next week. But that's another story...

    I'll keep you posted, sure.
    Send some photos of your upgrades when done, too!
    I'm curious about your bridge choice, why that one? My luthier mentioned something about the bigger "mass" of the tailpiece helping to dissipate the noise ..

    And do let us know about the VOS 59! That's my secret GAS wish

  34. #83
    Thanks to this forum I'm awaiting my epi es 175 premium in black. It was a journey. I've only been playing for 2 months and already went thru an epi 339, ibanez af75, and now an afj95b with the super 58 "customs". I got rid of the af75. I'm still a beginner but am a professional sound engineer and composer. So I can hear a great tone. I am in the middle of "is the sound about how I play and is it also the gear?". I think the afj95 is good, but not quite there? and only have my playability to blame. But if this 175 is that much greater with my beginner skills, I will put up a clip comparison. With all my vintage compressors, racks and drum machines, I've always recorded comparisons. But guitar is a different beast.

  35. #84

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    For learning and appreciating guitar, you couldn't have made a better choice in the archtop departement. I've being playing for almost 30 years and have had a bunch of guitars (not so much archtops thow) and this one is really great, one of the most satisfiying to play.
    There is something about the playability and sound that makes it kind of unique, very inspiring, it just flows with energy and punch.
    Good choice!

  36. #85
    joaopaz Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by 3rdeyestringtheory
    Thanks to this forum I'm awaiting my epi es 175 premium in black. It was a journey. I've only been playing for 2 months and already went thru an epi 339, ibanez af75, and now an afj95b with the super 58 "customs". I got rid of the af75. I'm still a beginner but am a professional sound engineer and composer. So I can hear a great tone. I am in the middle of "is the sound about how I play and is it also the gear?". I think the afj95 is good, but not quite there? and only have my playability to blame. But if this 175 is that much greater with my beginner skills, I will put up a clip comparison. With all my vintage compressors, racks and drum machines, I've always recorded comparisons. But guitar is a different beast.
    Hey, congrats in advance! Be sure to post some pics when you get your black beauty

    Since you mentioned the Ibanez AFJ95 and the Epiphone ES-175 .. I own both. I get what you're saying about the sound not quite there on the Ibanez. I couldn't pinpoint exactly what it was, that is, it sounded great but I always felt it lacked something, perhaps a bit of extra "personality". About a month ago ordered/installed a Bare Knuckles "Manhattan" P90 (in humbucker size) to my Ibanez. This pickup is nothing short of amazing and it's exactly what I was looking for, since I wanted a sound "old style", like some early Jim Hall. Since I did it it has been hard to put this guitar down. Right now I just play both these I mentioned.

    In terms of playability I have a super comfortable setup on both, these are really easy to play - so it boils down mostly to the body shape. Perhaps the Ibanez is easier for me, not yet sure.
    In terms of acoustic sound the Epiphone is the clear winner, which I found surprising, given the fact that's a laminated guitar and the Ibanez is a solid top. But the Ibanez is a bit dull... of course this goes away when I plug the guitar!
    In terms of electric sound it's hard, really... the Bare Knuckles being a "boutique" pickup is a serious contender and here on the forum I got a bit of a consistent feedback saying the Ibanez sounded "marginally better". But overall I'm really happy to have both sounding so so so so nice!

    The Ibanez finish is perfect, but thick. The Epiphone has loads of "mojo" and the thin finish is a major plus IMO, and it sure feels like is going to age great!

    So, to cut a long story short, be sure to keep both guitars You could try to swap the pickups on the Ibanez, the guitar sure deserves it.

    My Epiphone is "out" for some upgrades and I'm dying to get it back and into action!

    Will be looking forward to your comparison clips, too.

  37. #86
    joaopaz Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by Jx30510
    For learning and appreciating guitar, you couldn't have made a better choice in the archtop departement. I've being playing for almost 30 years and have had a bunch of guitars (not so much archtops thow) and this one is really great, one of the most satisfiying to play.
    There is something about the playability and sound that makes it kind of unique, very inspiring, it just flows with energy and punch.
    Good choice!
    Amen to that

  38. #87
    I will definitely post pics and maybe simple comparisons.. I hope the epi 175 will end my gas attack/search so I can bond and practice with the gear. I really like the look of the afj95. I'm curious about the Pu upgrade as well. It seems like it sounds good in the upper frets, and then something missing in the lower frets. I forgot to mention I also had the loar 280 for 3 hours then returned it because of the shoddy quality and a dimple in the body. Sound was great in headphones though.

  39. #88
    joaopaz Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by 3rdeyestringtheory
    I will definitely post pics and maybe simple comparisons.. I hope the epi 175 will end my gas attack/search so I can bond and practice with the gear. I really like the look of the afj95. I'm curious about the Pu upgrade as well. It seems like it sounds good in the upper frets, and then something missing in the lower frets. I forgot to mention I also had the loar 280 for 3 hours then returned it because of the shoddy quality and a dimple in the body. Sound was great in headphones though.
    Hi!
    Just sent you a PM with a recording of the Ibanez with the new PU.

    Forgot to say ... since your Epi is already on its way ... Welcome to the Club, man Yours is the Epiphone ES-174 #13 on this thread

    About the The Loars. Yeah, I have a few and they have some cosmetic issues, for sure. But I love them, the way they feel and react to your playing. They just need a proper setup and will be great guitars! At least for me!

  40. #89
    Thanks jaopaz, I appreciate it. Great sound and great playing man! Those pick ups sound real sweet you weren't kidding. What were your string gauges btw? And what was the recording chain?

  41. #90
    joaopaz Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by 3rdeyestringtheory
    Thanks jaopaz, I appreciate it. Great sound and great playing man! Those pick ups sound real sweet you weren't kidding. What were your string gauges btw? And what was the recording chain?
    Thanks! The chain was... guitar to amp - Polytone Mini Brute I, flat, just with a little bass added - Sure SM57 mic, Alesis Multimix Fx 8 mixer with USB to laptop. The BT was from youtube and I played at the same time, into Audacity. Strings are Thomastik Infeld .012 flatwounds... I played it fingerstyle :-)

    Will do a similar recording with the Epiphone as soon s it returns from the luthier!

  42. #91

    User Info Menu

    As treasurer of the Epiphone ES-175 Owners Club, I need to remind you that your $20 April monthly dues are now past due.

    You can pay them online using your credit or debit card at: www.gumbofund.com

  43. #92
    joaopaz Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by cosmic gumbo
    As treasurer of the Epiphone ES-175 Owners Club, I need to remind you that your $20 April monthly dues are now past due.

    You can pay them online using your credit or debit card at: www.gumbofund.com
    For a microsecond you got me thinking there was another scammer in the forum

  44. #93
    joaopaz Guest
    Hi guys!

    I'll pick up my guitar tomorrow. In the meantime here's some photos my guitar tech sent me, documenting the process.

    The current set of upgrades, included:
    A bone nut
    A complete rewire
    4x CTS 500k (Audio)
    1x Paper-in-Oil Condenser K40Y-9 .15uF (neck)
    1x Paper-in-Oil Condenser K40Y-9 .22uF (bridge)
    Switchcraft jack input
    Japan Gold Contact toggle switch
    2x Set of Bell Knob Gold Letter (volume and tone)

    Before pics:
    Epiphone ES-175 Owners Club-es-175_01-jpgEpiphone ES-175 Owners Club-es-175_02-jpgEpiphone ES-175 Owners Club-es-175_03-jpgEpiphone ES-175 Owners Club-es-175_04-jpgEpiphone ES-175 Owners Club-es-175_05-jpg

    After pics:
    Epiphone ES-175 Owners Club-es-175_09-jpgEpiphone ES-175 Owners Club-es-175_08-jpgEpiphone ES-175 Owners Club-es-175_07-jpgEpiphone ES-175 Owners Club-es-175_06-jpgEpiphone ES-175 Owners Club-es-175_10-jpg
    The cost of this, was about 130Eur.

  45. #94

    User Info Menu

    Great!
    I'll be going this exact same route on mine next week.
    Do you know if a US Switchcraft toggle switch will fit the original hole on the body?

    That original nut is so sloppy looking

    Don't forget to give your impressions.

  46. #95

    User Info Menu

    And another, do the original buttons fit on the CTS Pots? If I remember well the pots threads should be different and the buttons don't fit?

  47. #96

    User Info Menu

    I doubt the new wiring has a significant effect on the tone (unless you alter the values of the components) but those pots probably feel and work better. (I actually think the Epiphone wiring is pretty neat).

    A bone nut is always a good thing!


    Verzonden vanaf mijn iPhone met Tapatalk

  48. #97

    User Info Menu

    As always some say changing things on guitars change the tone (pots, capacitors, wire...) and some write entire forums about it..
    I don't have much experience in that domain, but I wonder if Joapaz will think (and hear) ?
    Changing caps value must have an effect in the tone sweep somehow, or why would there be all those different types and materials (ceramic, paper in oil, mika...)?

  49. #98
    joaopaz Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by Jx30510
    Great!
    I'll be going this exact same route on mine next week.
    Do you know if a US Switchcraft toggle switch will fit the original hole on the body?

    That original nut is so sloppy looking

    Don't forget to give your impressions.
    Hi Jx, I don't know but I'll ask tomorrow.

    The original nut looks a bit ugly, yes, but maybe that's because I had added some graphite to it, to smooth the string path

  50. #99
    joaopaz Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by Jx30510
    And another, do the original buttons fit on the CTS Pots? If I remember well the pots threads should be different and the buttons don't fit?
    I had to buy new knobs, yes.. that's the last item on the list of material I posted.
    My guitar teck gave me this link:
    BOUTONS GIBSON - Fred's Guitar Parts

    Note that you have always two references for each knobne's in inches and the other one is metric.

  51. #100
    joaopaz Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by Little Jay
    I doubt the new wiring has a significant effect on the tone (unless you alter the values of the components) but those pots probably feel and work better. (I actually think the Epiphone wiring is pretty neat).

    A bone nut is always a good thing!


    Verzonden vanaf mijn iPhone met Tapatalk
    I don't think the new wiring will change to tone, either. My hope is that it will shield the inside wires better, reducing the exposure to outside intereference and reducing noise.
    I don't know very much about it but my guitar tech said that should be done and I'm with it he has done a super job on each and every guitar I took him!

    I also think the original wiring looked well done, too But the new wiring looks super cool - the guy takes a lot of pride in his soldering skills!