Reply to Thread Bookmark Thread
Page 3 of 5 FirstFirst 12345 LastLast
Posts 101 to 150 of 240
  1. #101

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by 2bornot2bop
    The DR bronze wounds were crap. They lasted all of 3 hours, and I trashed them. 3 sets of strings in one week and I'm settling on the TI Bebop round 14's for the HJS.

    JD I'd be curious to hear the GJS recorded with TI Bebop's of your choice. I find acoustic electrics sound richer with the TI Bebop's.
    I must confess surprise that you defer to TI Bebop rounds, I believe the greater number of Archtop players here use
    TI flats , for very good reason ,they are long lasting , have less tension than other makes and do not induce string
    squeak, which is anathema to most, and particularly when playing Ballads. having used TI flats for probably the best
    part of 30 years I find them to be the best strings of any other make. They are expensive but that is offset by their
    longevity. The answer is to buy in bulk 10 sets + .
    However I notice they are more expensive in the USA generally. They can be had for approx £11.20 - £12.20 via
    Thomann or DV247. It might be worth research into costs importing? they may be no cheaper to you due to import
    charges & Postage .

    .

  2.  

    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #102

    User Info Menu

    2b,
    You must have strong hands to use 14's. Just keep an eye on the top arch of that HJS. I know you are a very knowledgable guy - but I remember my conversation with Heritage guitars years ago about string gauge on their Johnny's . They told me (towards the end of production of these models ) they left the factory with either 11's or 12's - no higher.

    They also said people were cranking down the screws on the fingers and exerting too much top pressure - resulting in partially collapsed tops.

    I looked at a HJS from a guy out in CA with a collapsed top on the bass side. The saddle was cranked almost off the screw stud to compensate for the dropped top.

    Just sharing what I learned .

  4. #103

    User Info Menu

    Some folks who use heavy gauge round wounds have;

    Really strong hands
    Are partially deaf
    No regard for the rest of the family

    Me?

    I have weak hands, a light touch and use Flatwound strings and an Amp to piss off everyone in my house. Its my reminder to them as to who's name is Mortgage Bill every month..

    Just kidding.

    JD

  5. #104

    User Info Menu

    I'm using BB13s on my archtop which I rarely play amplified. I would try the 12s out of curiosity if they had the wound G. Curious to try the Benson round wound TI 12s on my archtop because of that and the bigger low End compared to the high E, than on the Bebops, despite of the stupid price. Looking at Pyramids too. I wish Thomastik would rework and expand their range a little.

  6. #105

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by Joe DeNisco
    Some folks who use heavy gauge round wounds have;

    Really strong hands
    Are partially deaf
    No regard for the rest of the family

    Me?

    I have weak hands, a light touch and use Flatwound strings and an Amp to piss off everyone in my house. Its my reminder to them as to who's name is Mortgage Bill every month..

    Just kidding.

    JD
    Paying the cost to be the boss!

  7. #106

    User Info Menu

    I have to say, as far as roundwounds go, TI Bebops are the easiest on the fingers that I have played. But that unwound third on the 12's is absurd. With a wood bridge saddle, intonation is off. And like all roundwounds, they go dead in short order. And then they sound almost like flatwounds, just not as thick, nor are they as comfortable on the fingers.

    TI Swing series flats are the best strings ever! I use both their 12's and 13's (depending on the guitar) and have used them for about 15 years now. Being that I am a "If it ain't broke, don't fix it" kind of guy, I plan on using them as long as they are available or until I check out. Whichever comes first.

  8. #107

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by Stringswinger
    But that unwound third on the 12's is absurd. With a wood bridge saddle, intonation is off.
    The TI George Benson round wounds (GR112) have a wound third but they are a little more expensive.

  9. #108

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by medblues
    The TI George Benson round wounds (GR112) have a wound third but they are a little more expensive.

    I have tried both the Benson rounds and flats and found them to be a tad brighter than the Swings and Bebops (was this my imagination, or have others found this as well?)

  10. #109

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by Stringswinger
    I have to say, as far as roundwounds go, TI Bebops are the easiest on the fingers that I have played. But that unwound third on the 12's is absurd. With a wood bridge saddle, intonation is off. And like all roundwounds, they go dead in short order. And then they sound almost like flatwounds, just not as thick, nor are they as comfortable on the fingers.

    TI Swing series flats are the best strings ever! I use both their 12's and 13's (depending on the guitar) and have used them for about 15 years now. Being that I am a "If it ain't broke, don't fix it" kind of guy, I plan on using them as long as they are available or until I check out. Whichever comes first.
    SS, Good points. In my opinion, when TI JazzSwing 12's are fresh, they are as perfect a string as there can possibly be.
    I find something, I like it, I stick with it.
    Just about every restaurant I go to, I don't even Look at the menu. I get the same thing at that restaurant everytime. Ruths Chris, Veal Osso Buco Ravioli, 11oz filet, Loaded Baked Potato. A glass of Seghesio Zin. I'm good, 7 days a week, twice on Sunday..

  11. #110

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by Stringswinger
    I have tried both the Benson rounds and flats and found them to be a tad brighter than the Swings and Bebops (was this my imagination, or have others found this as well?)
    You should sample Bebop 14's on one of your D'A's. They provide that extra umph to volume and harmonics from my perspective. They're as comfortable to play, for me, than a pair of D'Addario 12's. Bebop 14's are my string of choice for acoustics...flats don't do it for me unless it's a humbucker...and even then I miss the "feel" and grip of the wound Bebops. Personal choice.

  12. #111

    User Info Menu

    2B, I have tried the GB 14 flats. Too heavy for my taste. Swing Flats in 13 are pushing it for me. One of these days, I will probably just use TI Swing 12's like Joe D.

  13. #112

    User Info Menu

    TI Swing 13s are great for my L5's, L7's and Lee Rit. Signature, but some guitars benefit from exchanging the E1 to a 14. This is what i use on my LeGrand and i will soon try it on my JS too. I don't think i need more strength because of it, but the tone definitely improves. Also the 14 lasts longer than the 13 which, after a few weeks usually starts losing power.

  14. #113

    User Info Menu

    The best part about this thread is that it led me to Joe's YouTube page. There is an absolute wealth of brilliantly played music with top notch arrangements. Consider me subscribed!

  15. #114

    User Info Menu

    Thanks buddy.
    now that I'm absolutely DONE wheeling and dealing, I'm going back to playing my butt off.
    My boy Vinny got on me a little about becoming an out of control mess. He was right. Even though I had a goal, I said a lot things that I went back on. I didn't mean in any way to deceive anyone and wasn't building up a guitar just to sell it. Everything I said about the guitars I owned and then sold was absolutely honest, from my heart. They were all great. Some of which were the greatest I ever touched, at the time. I wasn't building up anything for the wrong reasons.
    I had a long term goal. It was a Johnny Smith. And now I have 2. I couldn't imagine that in my wildest dreams. Everything else under that is in place now. I'm very content.
    You guys are the best.
    JD
    Last edited by Max405; 10-08-2016 at 01:44 PM.

  16. #115

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by Joe DeNisco
    Thanks buddy.
    now that I'm absolutely DONE wheeling and dealing, I'm going back to playing my butt off.
    My boy Vinny got on me a little about becoming an out of control mess. He was right. Even though I had a goal, I said a lot things that I went back on. I didn't mean in any way to deceive anyone and wasn't building up a guitar just to sell it. Everything I said about the guitars I owned and then sold was absolutely honest, from my heart. They were all great. Some of which were the greatest I ever touched, at the time. I wasn't building up anything for the wrong reasons.
    I had a long term goal. It was a Johnny Smith. And now I have 2. I couldn't imagine that in my wildest dreams. Everything else under that is in place now. I'm very content.
    You guys are the best.
    JD

    I am glad you are finished with guitar selling. Doug and I are out of cash.....

  17. #116

    User Info Menu

    Can I interest you in an Ovation?
    Kidding. You guys were very helpful. I promise, im done.
    JD

  18. #117

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by Joe DeNisco
    Can I interest you in an Ovation? Kidding. You guys were very helpful. I promise, im done. JD
    Sure…. we believe you…really….
    Just remember…the wind cries….Chancellor….Chancellor…

  19. #118

    User Info Menu

    Joe,
    Number one saying around here, and you probably know this as much as anyone....
    Never say never, or in this case 'done'
    Really lucky to have owned many of my dream guitars over my lifetime and it's been quite awhile since I bought a guitar or amp, but still have a few on my bucket list.
    If l find something that really moves me I still might jump

  20. #119

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by Joe DeNisco
    SS, Good points. In my opinion, when TI JazzSwing 12's are fresh, they are as perfect a string as there can possibly be.
    I find something, I like it, I stick with it.
    Just about every restaurant I go to, I don't even Look at the menu. I get the same thing at that restaurant everytime. Ruths Chris, Veal Osso Buco Ravioli, 11oz filet, Loaded Baked Potato. A glass of Seghesio Zin. I'm good, 7 days a week, twice on Sunday..

    I know exactly what I am having next time I go to Ruth's Chris!

  21. #120

    User Info Menu

    Max as in Max Bauer ?

  22. #121

    User Info Menu

    Long ago when I was in shape 405lbs was my max on the bench. Since then 2 partially torn pecs and a completely torn left tricep muscle has me unable to bench press only the 45lb bar. Sucks. But, that's life!

  23. #122

    User Info Menu

    Ahhh, I thought it was for the 405 guitars you've owned.

    If you are truly done (for the moment) purchasing guitars, I hope that it will give you more time to record and post more tunes, love your arrangements, touch and tone!

  24. #123

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by ESCC
    Ahhh, I thought it was for the 405 guitars you've owned.

    If you are truly done (for the moment) purchasing guitars, I hope that it will give you more time to record and post more tunes, love your arrangements, touch and tone!
    Thank you buddy. I am going to spend more time playing and recording. My stuff will be better as a result.
    It is my pleasure to share my stuff with you guys.

  25. #124

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by Max405
    Long ago when I was in shape 405lbs was my max on the bench. Since then 2 partially torn pecs and a completely torn left tricep muscle has me unable to bench press only the 45lb bar. Sucks. But, that's life!
    Sorry to hear that JD! Tricep and Pec tears can be very painful. Did you injure them lifting? Surgery? Recovered now?

  26. #125

    User Info Menu

    I tore both pec muscles in my basement with 365 on the bar.
    My tricep when I took a header on my mountain bike.
    Both cases, no surgery. My tricep rolled down toward my elbow. It was part of the large head. Looks funny now.
    Thanks bro.
    Joe D

  27. #126

    User Info Menu

    I encountered a bit of a dilemma last night. Now that I've gotten use to the GJS, I love it. But its a very different playing experience than my other guitars. The frets are low and were that way on the brand new guitar back in 1976.
    They have basically made me touch down quicker, cleaner and firmer and then pick the note. I think my playing is cleaner as a result. The low frets actually allow for much lower action too. Both actual, and perceived.

    When I play the 175 that I just got, I find that until I get use to it, I sound a bit like Stanley Jordan. A lot of what I play is "hammered" on before I pick. So you actually hear the notes before I pick. That's a problem, because in order for me to play different guitars, I have to get use to them when I jump back and forth.

    So here's the dilemma..

    I prefer the GJS setup. Lower frets. Ultra low action. When I play it, I am flying all over the neck. Smoothly, with no separation in notes from string to string. Much better than I can play on my 3 other guitars. But in order for me to stick with this setup, I wont want to play my other guitars.

    I am thinking for consistency sake, I NEED to change the frets over on the GJS. I absolutely don't want to, because I prefer the setup on the GJS. But I might have to forfeit what I just discovered that I like - in favor of what I should play because if I don't, then I'll only play one or my four guitars..

    So, the Gibson Zero frets had definite advantages over regular frets. But, those advantages never took hold because all other guitars felt different.

    The other thing to consider.. The binding nibs on the GJS are tiny, just like the frets themselves. When I changeover the frets, there is NO WAY to retain the existing binding nibs. The new frets would be higher.

    The only thing I can do is change the frets, but choose a fret that will be as close as possible to what I have now, AND be close the frets on my Tal, HJS and this new 175. You know, somewhere in the middle.

    Some other things...
    Even though they are both Gibsons, there is a tremendous difference in the feel between the GJS and the 175. The GJS has a flatter fretboard. The same TI 12s on both the GJS and the 175 feel Totally different. The 12's on the 175 feel more like 13's or even 14's when compared the 12's on the GJS. The sound of the GJS is deep and there is less sustain. The sound focus is primarily low to midrange. The sound of the 175 is very twangy by comparison.
    The GJS feels like a "tighter" Guitar even though the strings feel like a lower gauge. The GJS feels like a more refined tool than the 175 does. Like a laser beam as opposed to a light bulb.

    I knew that once I got use to the GJS, it was going to allow me to play better. I didn't think it was going be this much different than my other guitars.

    My GJS is here for keeps. But I might actually have to temper its greatness just a bit in order for it to co-exist with the HJS, Tal and the 175.

    Joe D.

  28. #127

    User Info Menu

    Joe,

    Have you thought about treating them as though they are different instruments? I regularly switch between guitars that have different frets, but widths, neck profiles, radii, etc.. I do it during live shows too. Maybe I'm just not as good of a guitarist as you (I'm not), but I try to look at it as a multi-instrumentalist, kind of like switching between a guitar and a bass.

    I don't know if that would help you, but I think it works for me. I can usually reset in a matter of a few seconds.

    It just pains me to think about you changing the frets on the GJS.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  29. #128

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by ThatRhythmMan
    Joe,

    Have you thought about treating them as though they are different instruments? I regularly switch between guitars that have different frets, but widths, neck profiles, radii, etc.. I do it during live shows too. Maybe I'm just not as good of a guitarist as you (I'm not), but I try to look at it as a multi-instrumentalist, kind of like switching between a guitar and a bass.

    I don't know if that would help you, but I think it works for me. I can usually reset in a matter of a few seconds.

    It just pains me to think about you changing the frets on the GJS.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Rhythm Man, the fact that you can adapt to different guitars in a matter seconds makes you a way better player than me. Way better.
    You bring up a good point. I should treat them as different instruments.
    Vinny told me that the low frets on these old Gibsons were changed on brand new guitars back in the 70's.

    I want to share the playing time on my babies. I want to love playing all of them. Right now, the GJS is an absolutely sick guitar to play. Almost un-naturally so. Low frets require low action. For me anyways. The guitar really can play itself.

    I will have to explore this more. Its actually really fun to have such problems. Its like being TOO good looking. Oh yeah, how the hell would I know that!

    Joe D.

  30. #129

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by Max405
    Rhythm Man, the fact that you can adapt to different guitars in a matter seconds makes you a way better player than me. Way better.
    You bring up a good point. I should treat them as different instruments.
    Vinny told me that the low frets on these old Gibsons were changed on brand new guitars back in the 70's.

    I want to share the playing time on my babies. I want to love playing all of them. Right now, the GJS is an absolutely sick guitar to play. Almost un-naturally so. Low frets require low action. For me anyways. The guitar really can play itself.

    I will have to explore this more. Its actually really fun to have such problems. Its like being TOO good looking. Oh yeah, how the hell would I know that!

    Joe D.
    Thank you for the kind words. I definitely would not say I'm a better player than you, but would concede that maybe we have a different skill set.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  31. #130

    User Info Menu

    JD,

    I always liked the low frets of the 70's Gibsons, but have also come to like Jumbos. For me, rotating so many guitars, I have worked at adapting. If not adapting to different guitars was important to me, I would play only one guitar, like Barney Kessel. You could refret the GJS, but it will still be different than the 175.

    If I were you, I would spend a bit of time working at adaptation before doing the fret job, only to find that you still have to adapt your playing style to the different guitars with their different necks, different nut sizes, different scale lengths and different tones.

  32. #131

    User Info Menu

    I think you are right SS.
    Maybe once I rotate them in and out a bit more, I might get better at adapting.
    I love the crap out of this GJS.
    JD

  33. #132

    User Info Menu

    OR, change the frets on your other guitars to more closely match the GJS. I'd not tamper with the frets on the GJS if it doesn't need a fret job...those nibs are part of the original guitar, yes...I'd leave that guitar alone and be grateful to learn low frets are an asset to your playing. How expensive is a fret job on 3 guitars, $1200? Money well spent if having that low action is that important to you. AND you gain the benefit of keeping a near classic original...that's important too, no?

  34. #133

    User Info Menu

    If you want to play fast like George Benson or Pat Martino you cannot beat the 70's Gibson zero frets. You want to play chord melody you need a jumbo / medium fret with a perfect crown. Your playing style should dictate which type of fret you have on your axes. I could never understand why binding nibs or original frets are so sacred to some folks. Frets are a wear item just like your strings or the brakes on your car. A neck that plays absolutely perfect to your style of playing should be more important than binding nibs. I have always been a jumbo / medium guy. All the Gibson's I bought in the 70's got re-fretted. Yes binding nibs look very nice but is that more important than your tone ? Yes I am thankful that Gibson now uses jumbo / mediums on their guitars and I get to keep the nibs but a nib-less Gibson was never a issue with me. My buddy Tuck gets almost yearly fret jobs on his L5 and he uses jumbo / highs. Low frets also causes fingerboard divets.

  35. #134

    User Info Menu

    Hi Joe,

    (de-lurking)

    I, too, have a clutch of favorites and usually switch among them fairly easily, although it always takes a little bit to settle in with each one. But I would never consider modifying the best playing guitar to be more like the ones that don't feel as natural to me. Sounds like an alternate definition of insanity.

    I would also never intentionally install low Gibby frets on a guitar, since most players aren't keen on them. Resale might be impacted.

    I would, however, revel in the fact that you found a guitar that plays so great and actually makes a real difference in your skills. You have been around long enough to know how unusual that is! So relish it. Make the JS your main squeeze, and use the others to counter that inevitable lull of boredom that periodically hits.

    Sometimes - perhaps often - the guitar that plays the best, and squeezes out the extra nuance in your playing, is not the one you wish it was (i.e. the rare, valuable, or pretty one)! So be happy your emotional favorite is also the physical favorite.

    Congrats on the discovery, BTW.

  36. #135

    User Info Menu

    Joe,
    If your not too concerned about affecting originality - and your committed to long term ownership then perhaps a fret job would facilitate transitioning between your other guitars.

    No disrespect to 2b, but I would not advocate refretting others with similar frets on the GJS , then they will be the odd ball during a potential future sale - and those nibs (if present ) will be missing . But as 2b notes, keeping the originality of an instrument intact does have its benefits.

    Everyone's viewpoints very good indeed- but do what's right for you.

    If you do refret- I think the Jumbo's as mentioned by Stringswinger would be my first choice.

  37. #136

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by vinnyv1k
    If you want to play fast like George Benson or Pat Martino you cannot beat the 70's Gibson zero frets. You want to play chord melody you need a jumbo / medium fret with a perfect crown. Your playing style should dictate which type of fret you have on your axes. I could never understand why binding nibs or original frets are so sacred to some folks. Frets are a wear item just like your strings or the brakes on your car. A neck that plays absolutely perfect to your style of playing should be more important than binding nibs. I have always been a jumbo / medium guy. All the Gibson's I bought in the 70's got re-fretted. Yes binding nibs look very nice but is that more important than your tone ? Yes I am thankful that Gibson now uses jumbo / mediums on their guitars and I get to keep the nibs but a nib-less Gibson was never a issue with me. My buddy Tuck gets almost yearly fret jobs on his L5 and he uses jumbo / highs. Low frets also causes fingerboard divets.
    Vin, As you know, I play primarily chord melody, but there are a lot of fast lines in the arrangements I play. I also like playing fast and slow single line stuff too.
    Your last line concerns me. I've seen fingerboard divets on guitars and that is a major turnoff. I would be disgusted with myself if I put divets in the neck of this guitar. So that is a really compelling reason to change out the frets.
    Thanks for chiming in. Now I don't have to call you on my way home tonight..

  38. #137

    User Info Menu

    What Stringswinger and RPGuitar said. If the guitar is a dream to play . . .almost perfect, don't make it like the other less perfect guitars for the sake of consistency.
    Last edited by ESCC; 10-12-2016 at 04:41 PM.

  39. #138

    User Info Menu

    Not having consistency and having to change your physical parameters just a little bit is studied to be better for learning and retention. I think ThatRhythmMan and rpguitar have complementary points. Treat them like different instruments and gamify the process.

  40. #139

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by rpguitar
    Hi Joe,

    (de-lurking)

    I, too, have a clutch of favorites and usually switch among them fairly easily, although it always takes a little bit to settle in with each one. But I would never consider modifying the best playing guitar to be more like the ones that don't feel as natural to me. Sounds like an alternate definition of insanity.

    I would also never intentionally install low Gibby frets on a guitar, since most players aren't keen on them. Resale might be impacted.

    I would, however, revel in the fact that you found a guitar that plays so great and actually makes a real difference in your skills. You have been around long enough to know how unusual that is! So relish it. Make the JS your main squeeze, and use the others to counter that inevitable lull of boredom that periodically hits.

    Sometimes - perhaps often - the guitar that plays the best, and squeezes out the extra nuance in your playing, is not the one you wish it was (i.e. the rare, valuable, or pretty one)! So be happy your emotional favorite is also the physical favorite.

    Congrats on the discovery, BTW.
    Roger, Welcome back. You missed a lot of cool stuff since you've been gone.
    But, I can see that you being away so long has NOT clouded your legendary clear judgement. And as you can see, I still get caught in my underwear over the most idiotic stuff.
    You are right. The GJS will be my main guitar and I will stop whining about how my other guitars don't match up to it.

    I am very happy that the guitar that I've always wanted was a guitar that I was able to adapt too. It took me 3-4 days but its done.
    JD

  41. #140

    User Info Menu

    Qwasel,
    This must be killing you. You go out and find me the most original and spectacular JS on the planet and here I am thinking of hacking it up..

    I am definitely committed to long term ownership of this guitar. If I do the frets, I will do the EVO's that just like you suggested when we were together the other night are just a tiny bit higher than these. I might need your help determining what they should be.. Can you look at the Jescar Site and tell me what you think would be the right fret? Some what of a bridge between this and your L5P? It think that would solve all the problems.
    The thing that Vinny pointed out scares me to pieces. If I put a divet of any kind in this board, I will never forgive myself.

    2b's advice was really logical and while I am sure the tech would certainly agree that doing 3 fret jobs instead of 1 is absolutely the right answer, I cant see myself doing that.

    Thanks, Joe D.

    Quote Originally Posted by QAman
    Joe,
    If your not too concerned about affecting originality - and your committed to long term ownership then perhaps a fret job would facilitate transitioning between your other guitars.

    No disrespect to 2b, but I would not advocate refretting others with similar frets on the GJS , then they will be the odd ball during a potential future sale - and those nibs (if present ) will be missing . But as 2b notes, keeping the originality of an instrument intact does have its benefits.

    Everyone's viewpoints very good indeed- but do what's right for you.

    If you do refret- I think the Jumbo's as mentioned by Stringswinger would be my first choice.

  42. #141

    User Info Menu

    Max405,
    Your best bet is to visit Ian as we discussed - and speak to him about fret choices and look at some examples. He does fine work - and has 20 plus years of refretting high end guitars
    I'm sure he has numerous examples for you to see and feel and he's not that far away.

  43. #142

    User Info Menu

    Bill Comins is in the Philadelphia area. I am sure he'd be able to set you up with a tremendous fret job.

  44. #143

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by ESCC
    What Stringswinger and RPGuitar said. If the guitar is a dream to play . . .almost perfect, don't make like the other less perfect guitars for the sake of consistency.
    You and they are right. But I think a fret with the slightest amount of additional height might do the trick. Thanks ESCC

    Quote Originally Posted by medblues
    Not having consistency and having to change your physical parameters just a little bit is studied to be better for learning and retention. I think ThatRhythmMan and rpguitar have complementary points. Treat them like different instruments and gamify the process.
    Medblues, Yeah, sure, easy for you to say..
    One of my problems is I love sitting down for 90 minutes at a clip and playing full arrangements that the masters themselves who arranged them couldn't even remember. This is my way of practicing. The arrangements in and of themselves are challenging enough. On top of remembering where to put your fingers, the added wrinkle of how hard to press and at what velocity is WAAAYY too much for this left hook pummeled brain to take.
    Vinny told me that this is why the great ones always used one guitar. He is so right. I am looking for too much of perfect situation.
    The bottom line, I probably want to raise the frets just a tad. I will probably pick up some sustain. And I wont put divets in the fretboard.

  45. #144

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by QAman
    Max405,
    Your best bet is to visit Ian as we discussed - and speak to him about fret choices and look at some examples. He does fine work - and has 20 plus years of refretting high end guitars
    I'm sure he has numerous examples for you to see and feel and he's not that far away.
    Yep, you are right.
    Tom told me they have a bunch of different guitars there that I can try out.
    I'd rather not be without the guitar for any length of time but all good luthiers have a backlog..

    JD

  46. #145

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by Max405
    Yep, you are right.
    Tom told me they have a bunch of different guitars there that I can try out.
    I'd rather not be without the guitar for any length of time but all good luthiers have a backlog..

    JD
    Max405,
    Based on our discussions - and taking into account your dilemma - I think a refret is the prudent decision. Most GJS on the used market DO NOT have the original frets, so if having uniform playability among your guitars is important- then follow that objective.

  47. #146

    User Info Menu

    Too high and you can have intonation and speed problems. Too low and you can't get a proper crown so you lose tone and sustain. Better a little high than a little low IMO. You can always level and crown if a little high.
    What you have now are jumbo / lows. I would keep the original width and go with a medium height. It will slow you a bit but you will have increased sustain and tone. That is the trade off. Speed vs tone & sustain. With jumbo / mediums you will still have feeler gauge action although it won't look like you do visually. You will need to replace the nut also.

  48. #147

    User Info Menu

    +1 what Steve said. You are never selling that axe. Make it perfect for you.

  49. #148

    User Info Menu

    You guys are perfectly right. I can't you all enough for the help. Thanks Joe D

  50. #149

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by Max405
    Yep, you are right.
    Tom told me they have a bunch of different guitars there that I can try out.
    I'd rather not be without the guitar for any length of time but all good luthiers have a backlog..

    JD
    My experience with frets, fret ends and playability :

    My '89 L-4 CES needed frets when I got it and a decent luthier here put on fretless wonders......it played really really well when he got through with it......but - - the nibs were almost always a problem.....with our weather here, once a year there was the usual wood shrinkage, and the ends would become more exposed than usual......the next luthier I found years later used the Super Glue trick on the ends and that seemed to work.....
    I'd also learned that luthiers can replace the bottom binding only when they replaced frets, and that this would take maybe months.....I know with a luthier of that competence, backlog is a part of it, but I was also told there's major drying time involved. I liked the idea of doing just the bottom binding, for the cost savings.......but for me the big thing would be to live with the time it'd take to do the work..........." I just got this and now it's going to be in the shop for another four months ?? " ...but if it were me, I'd look hard at doing that bottom binding when and if you did frets....then for sure, you'd have none of the risk of sharp fret ends.....

    ..but maybe if you do check out those other frets, etc, maybe now would be the best time to replace the frets - before you will really hate to be without it........and there's nothing wrong with consistencies among your instruments......if you were a carpenter and you liked a notch in all your hammers at a certain spot, you'd have notches in all your hammers at that spot, and that'd be it !......

    MHO

    Hope that helped Joe, and good luck !!

    PS

    I'd also keep me eye out for another GJS - by time you got the first one back from the luthier, the next one could be
    ' in the shop '. ( ? )

  51. #150

    User Info Menu

    Here's a thought - so you've decided to get the frets redone. All the good luthiers have backlogs, so it'll be awhile. Why not spend the time considering exactly what you want, playing your other excellent guitars in rotation to inform your choices, and in the meantime play the frets right off the GJS. You know you want to.

    Seriously, though...it is your dream guitar - enjoy it to the... Max!