Reply to Thread Bookmark Thread
Page 1 of 5 123 ... LastLast
Posts 1 to 50 of 247
  1. #1

    User Info Menu

    Ok, guys. I am blown away.

    A little background.. Martygrass a friend to all on JGF for many many years found this one for me on Craigslist. He emailed me, told me what he thought of it and I immediately responded to the ad. I made an offer, the store owner countered and I accepted.
    The Guitar arrived via UPS at my office at around 10am today. You pay more, but I highly recommend having the UPs store pack, ship and insure expensive/rare guitar like this. It's worth the piece of mind.

    The guitar is incredible. Barely, if ever played. The color is beautiful. The wood is attractive, aged and resonant. The thin coating of lacquer protects a hand rubbed finish that must be seen to br believed. The thin finish also allows the wood to breath and project a sound that is bright with the bass strings that you can feel under you. The balance is amazing. I knew this guitar would sound good. The TI12's sound like round wound strings, minus the finger noise.

    Playability. Seriously guys, it can't get better. Everything was right at my fingertips. The magical 25" scale is fingerboard perfection. The action is low and the radious perfect. The 1-3/4" nut makes 6 string chords played at the nut a breeze. The neck is not as deep and full as I thought it would be but I played the guitar for 2 hours running through all my Johnny Smith stuff with absolutely no fatigue in my left hand.

    My wife and son commented on how clear the guitar sounded. I was amazed how this guitar makes different sounds than any other guitar I've owned. This is an absolute world class instrument. It will quench my thirst for a Johnny Smith for a long time to come.
    videos are forthcoming. For now, here are some pictures.

    Heritage Johnny Smith-image-jpgHeritage Johnny Smith-image-jpg
    Heritage Johnny Smith-image-jpgHeritage Johnny Smith-image-jpg

    The guitar is practically brand new. Easily the most attractive guitar I've ever owned. It's perfection. A guitar of a lifetime.
    Thanks for sharing this with me.

    Joe D
    Last edited by Max405; 07-02-2016 at 03:48 PM.

  2.  

    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #2

    User Info Menu

    WOOOHOOOO!!!!

    I doubt people who don't love guitars have any idea what it feels like to hold one of these in your hands and realize it is exactly what you were hoping, and maybe you had not hoped for enough because now the guitar is showing you that it can fulfill hopes you didn't even know you had.

    It's gorgeous. I love these lighter sunburst shades and this one is perfection.

    Can't wait to hear what sounds you awaken from it.

  4. #3

    User Info Menu

    Joes,
    The nicest looking HJS I've seen. The back is incredible !
    Glad it came it your way.....have fun with it Joe.

  5. #4

    User Info Menu

    Just sublime! That shading on the top!

    I'm looking forward to a video clip some day!

    Enjoy that thang, Joe!

  6. #5

    User Info Menu

    Joe, we need close ups of the spruce. It has a lot a figuring.

    I'm guessing this is a light guitar. Aaron Cowles tuned it and he goes lighter than most for the best high frequency responses without dulling the lows.

    My best advice to you is to never believe that this guitar is a poor man's Gibson Johnny Smith otherwise the GAS will never end. I know some feel that way and they're entitled to their lame opinions! From someone who knew and knows those who built JSs for Gibson and Heritage and who's had enough experience with both, it is naive to believe that one brand is better than another. You have to play the individual instrument to make a judgment.

    Big time congrats.

  7. #6

    User Info Menu

    Joe, that is a seriously great looking guitar, and I know in your capable hands it will sound as good as it looks. Kudos to Marty Grass for all he does, and to you, congratulations, and play it in good health!

    P.S. That abalone - just so sweet!

  8. #7

    User Info Menu

    Martygrass, I totally agree. This is a world class guitar. It takes second place behind nothing.
    The spruce is awesome in the sunlight. Here ya go.
    Heritage Johnny Smith-image-jpg

  9. #8
    IMHO Heritage does bursts like no other. Beautiful shading and flame on that one Joe. I am sure you will do it proud.

  10. #9

    User Info Menu

    Things DO happen for a reason. Just as JGF Alumni "Mr. Sheets of Sound" had to go through lots of guitars to find out his guitar soulmate was a Gibson Barney Kessel, I think you had to go through a similar journey to find this guitar. This new HJS is a beautiful guitar and having spent a lot of time with the amazing guitar that I got from you, I am of the opinion that a top notch Heritage is every bit the equal of the best Gibsons. The early Gibson Johnny Smiths would have a neck profile that would not suit you and the later ones would have quality issues that would bug you (Why do you think Johnny Smith moved to Heritage?)

    Now you have a guitar to put in that empty display case.

    Congratulazioni! May this guitar inspire your playing and may you play it in good health for many years to come.

    PS, That pickguard looks great. Do NOT change a thing.

  11. #10

    User Info Menu

    Absolutely great Joe! What a beautiful axe!
    i know what you're talking about :-) such a light, resonant guitar, loud, balanced, full voice.
    that burst is really something else - Heritage is right on top of the game IMHO.
    certainly not a poor mans version, just world class.
    And the HJS is also not just a blinged golden eagle for sure. It really is different.
    25" scale and 1.75 nut is a great combo.

    Enjoy!

  12. #11

    User Info Menu

    Spot Joe's Heritage JS:

    Heritage Johnny Smith-13235201_788847374548100_3501339481854062233_o-jpg

    There's another Heritage hanging behind it, if anyone's interested.

    A good guitar is a good guitar.

  13. #12

    User Info Menu

    Third from the back :-) I'd conjecture the one behind it is a golden eagle in a gorgeous almond sunburst or that nice deep brown old school sunburst.

  14. #13

    User Info Menu

    +1, Good song choices to demonstrate a superb instrument.
    & wonder why Heritage do not include the UK in their marketing
    strategy? they could give Gibson a run for the money from what
    I see and hear.

  15. #14

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by Stringswinger
    The early Gibson Johnny Smiths would have a neck profile that would not suit you and the later ones would have quality issues that would bug you (Why do you think Johnny Smith moved to Heritage?)
    Could you name some of these quality issues? What were the years in which the "later ones" were produced?
    TIA

  16. #15

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by JazzNote
    Could you name some of these quality issues? What were the years in which the "later ones" were produced?
    TIA
    Ugly volutes on some 70's models. Plain woods on most 70's models. Overly thick finish on some late 70's models. I think they are great guitars up to about 73. From 74 to the end of their run, they are hit or miss, some have good necks, others do not.

    In Lin Flanagan's excellent biography (Flanagan spent a lot of time interviewing Smith for the book), Flanagan wrote:

    "Smith felt that the Gibson model was a well built instrument, but during the course of his endorsement arrangement he became aware that the factory was not tooling up correctly for all their work, and therefore the guitars were not consistent. Each neck was different, which he found to be a frustration and a criticism that he had to endure for several years. He expressed that he could have done better himself with a jack knife. He eventually complained to Gibson in no uncertain terms, asking them to terminate the contract if they were not prepared to build the guitar to his specifications."

    In 1989, Smith terminated his contract with Gibson.

  17. #16

    User Info Menu

    Not sure, but i think the volutes started in 76. i have not seen any on earlier GJS's.

  18. #17

    User Info Menu

    Oh My Goodness Joe,

    That guitar is so stunning !! Love, love, love, love, love that burst back. WOW, sunset in Maui !! Gorgeous. Told you that good things would fall in your lap, you're a great stand up guy... Can't wait to hear you play her.

    Frankly I think that Heritage took the Johnny Smith model and ran with it for 6 touchdowns, tying Gayle Sayre's record. Congratulations...

    Big

  19. #18

    User Info Menu

    Smith also pulled his endorsement from Heritage in 2001
    due to alledged issues with carvers that left and changes being made without his approval. This info is also taken from
    Flanagans book. This was posted in response to Stringswinger
    Comments.

    Sent from my GT-N5110 using Tapatalk
    Last edited by QAman; 07-02-2016 at 11:10 AM.

  20. #19

    User Info Menu

    Steve, thanks for pointing that out.
    It seems that Johnny couldnt sit still for very long huh? I hope it was because he was unhappy with the product and not because of a monetary issue.
    JD

  21. #20

    User Info Menu

    Guess what guys?
    I can play the elusive Johnny Smith built Emin9 chord on this guitar. Even with my little baby hands.

    7
    7
    7
    5
    2
    2

    yeah!

  22. #21

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Longobardi
    Smith also pulled his endorsement from Heritage in 2001
    due to alledged issues with carvers that left and changes being made without his approval. This info is also taken from
    Flanagans book.

    Sent from my GT-N5110 using Tapatalk
    Steve, I have no reason to doubt that's true, at least the second part.

    Heritage made bastardized (I mean that in the nicest way possible) versions of the Johnny Smith. There were several 16" and two 18" versions. I've seen one with a mounted pickup, also.

    You may think Johnny approved those variants, but I'm skeptical based on some other things Heritage has done on artist models that I know did not receive permission from the artist. The artists were never informed. But these were excellent guitars anyway.

    I don't think it's true that Heritage lost one of its more skilled carvers during that period of time.

  23. #22

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Longobardi
    Smith also pulled his endorsement from Heritage in 2001
    due to alledged issues with carvers that left and changes being made without his approval. This info is also taken from
    Flanagans book. This was posted in response to Stringswinger
    Comments.
    Steve, I wonder about that.

    I think all of us who have been around guitars for awhile know that Gibson's from the 70's are hit or miss. I am sure that Johnny Smith had his issues with them. Johnny had issues with Guild over supposed building techniques, but Flanagan also posits that Johnny did not like the 24 3/4 scale on the 50's Guild Johnny Smith Awards. Perhaps Johnny became disenchanted with Heritage and that explained the move.

    Or could it be that Bob Benedetto, a guy who is not only one of the greatest guitar builders of all time, but who is also one of the greatest guitar Merchandisers of all time, got Johnny to make the move back to Guild?

    Why Johnny Smith, a guy famous for stretch chords, would endorse a guitar with a 25 5/8 scale is perplexing to me. I guess by that time, Johnny was no longer performing, so the longer scale was not a deal killer. But he did request a change to the Guild Benedetto Artist Award, to wit, that the neck contact the top all the way to the end. He could have required the 25 inch scale and 1 3/4 nut as well, but he did not.

    It is a real head scratcher, that is for sure.

  24. #23

    User Info Menu

    Joe,
    I believe Johnny had monetary motives as well. I actually started a seperate post a few days ago seeking information on the manufacturing of Johnny Smiths under Norlin and why the Norlin period is perceived as a generally undesirable period.
    According to Marty, archtop quality was still good during that period. Yet I still see comments about the ongoing debate between Gibson and Heritage. So...I felt compelled to remind everyone that the same notable artisians that were making archtops during Norlin, were those same guys who founded the Heritage Guitar company. All of our negative comments about that period only solidify the black cloud of Norlin period, which some might argue carried over to Heritage. After all- Norlin period archtops are percieved as less than other Gibson periods, and Heritage guitars never really obtained the prestige arguably deserved.

    So, here is what I have say, for those Norlin owners - stop bashing Heritage, and for Heritage owners stop bashing Norlin Gibsons. Why.....because they were made by many of the same artisians, and negative comments just continue to solidify and repress market valuations for both.


    Instead, lets talk about the great archtops that we have experienced from both organizations and improve the perception......and quite possibly market value.

    Joe, Im sorry to have brought this into your post, but it needed to be said. Additionally, your Heritage Johnny Smith contains the finest presentation grade woods of any HJS ive seen, and if you ever want to give it up - please put me on the top of list.....its really spectacular and do enjoy it.



    Sent from my GT-N5110 using Tapatalk

  25. #24

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by Joe DeNisco
    Guess what guys?
    I can play the elusive Johnny Smith built Emin9 chord on this guitar. Even with my little baby hands.

    7
    7
    7
    5
    2
    2

    yeah!
    OK, I tried that chord just now on three guitars,

    DA2...it ain't happening (25 3/8 scale)
    97 175 I can do it (24 3/4 scale)
    37 DA I can barely do it (25 scale)

    And at the risk of sounding like Donald trump, I do not have small hands (perhaps I have a short thumb, I do not do a lot of those thumb over chords).

    That is NOT a chord that I will be reaching for. Playing jazz on a guitar is hard enough already.....

  26. #25

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by Stringswinger
    OK, I tried that chord just now on three guitars,

    DA2...it ain't happening (25 3/8 scale)
    97 175 I can do it (24 3/4 scale)
    37 DA I can barely do it (25 scale)

    And at the risk of sounding like Donald trump, I do not have small hands (perhaps I have a short thumb, I do not do a lot of those thumb over chords).

    That is NOT a chord that I will be reaching for. Playing jazz on a guitar is hard enough already.....
    This is the 1st chord in the song Wait Till You See Her. I will play it at the beginning of each verse. That's it. Johnny plays it as part of chord runs which to me is insane.
    The fact is, such a small difference in scale length makes a difference in the geometry of a guitar.

    My DA has a 24-3/4 scale and I can't play it that guitar. That stopped me from buying another Herb Ellis, believe it or not. So, go figure..

    Thank you for trying to play that chord for me. There was no way I was playing it in the DA2 either.
    JD

  27. #26

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by Joe DeNisco
    This is the 1st chord in the song Wait Till You See Her. I will play it at the beginning of each verse. That's it. Johnny plays it as part of chord runs which to me is insane.
    The fact is, such a small difference in scale length makes a difference in the geometry of a guitar.

    My DA has a 24-3/4 scale and I can't play it that guitar. That stopped me from buying another Herb Ellis, believe it or not. So, go figure..

    Thank you for trying to play that chord for me. There was no way I was playing it in the DA2 either.
    JD
    I tried it too, and I have medium-large hands. I usually grab a stretch chord okay.

    This one was hard. On my L5ces clone (Aria) I could play it, but I could never grab it in full flight, while playing a tune.

    When I tried to play it on the Herb Ellis, it actually spoke to me audibly: "Hey, Joe DeNisco couldn't grab that chord on me, what makes you think YOU can? Huh? You think I'd let you do something with me that he couldn't? Think again, dude!"

    Guitars have a hard time dealing with new parents.

  28. #27

    User Info Menu

    I can get it on my tele...but yeah, never on the fly in the heat of the moment.

    Delicious chord, though, made me rediscover this much easier voicing:

    X 9 9 0 7 7

  29. #28

    User Info Menu

    Congratulations JD! She's EXTRA special! Just look at that burst!!!

    That's definitely got Floyd Newton's fingerprints all over it. Some of the finest Heritage archtop's I've owned were '94 models.

    Here's a nice article on Heritage with some mention of Floyd at the bottom.

    Builder Profile: Heritage Guitar

    Patrick would often mention glowing comments on guitars featuring Floyd's handiwork. He'd say nobody does a burst like Floyd did.

    Obviously you know how blessed you are to have found that particular HJS. There's not another like it anywhere. Keep that in mind if the crazy idea to sell it ever enters your head.

    I can't wait to hear it. Enjoy bro, you deserve that guitar!

  30. #29

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Longobardi
    According to Marty, archtop quality was still good during that period. Yet I still see comments about the ongoing debate between Gibson and Heritage. So...I felt compelled to remind everyone that the same notable artisians that were making archtops during Norlin, were those same guys who founded the Heritage Guitar company. All of our negative comments about that period only solidify the black cloud of Norlin period, which some might argue carried over to Heritage. After all- Norlin period archtops are percieved as less than other Gibson periods, and Heritage guitars never really obtained the prestige arguably deserved.
    Those "same notable artisans" were producing 50-60's pre Norlin Gibson guitars as well. I think its a very big stretch to lay the Norlin era problem guitars on later Heritage founders - low blow. Any startup company has issues...ever hear of Apple?

  31. #30

    User Info Menu

    I forgot to mention in my earlier post that this guitar might have the most beautiful sunburst I've ever seen.

    I like my bursts dark, gradual, not too red and not black at the edges. This one checks every box. Wow.

  32. #31

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by Marty Grass
    That Em9 is one of those I won't be able to use as a passing chord.
    I'd guess it's meant to be played with the low E tuned down to D anyway ...

  33. #32

    User Info Menu

    I dunno, it's kinda cool with an F# on the bottom...

  34. #33

    User Info Menu

    You're not the first to be hypnotized under the gaze of a quality burst. Why do you think some of us have a thing for Sunbursts! This ones telling a sexy story...that's my story, and I'm just gawkin' at her from the internet.

  35. #34

    User Info Menu

    1994...good year for Heritage bad year for Joe Pass lovers. Hey Joe no headstock pics ?

  36. #35

    User Info Menu

    Here's to Johnny Smith, Heritage and Gibson guitars, and a guy in love with his new guitar!


  37. #36

    User Info Menu

    For you broHeritage Johnny Smith-image-jpgHeritage Johnny Smith-image-jpg

  38. #37

    User Info Menu

    Hey, how's about that signature!?

    I'd be interested in learning the back story on how it was a '94 HJS existed for over 20 years showing hardly any signs of wear?

  39. #38

    User Info Menu

    Just had to perform a ground wire ectomy. The ground wire was disconnected. Had to solder back on.
    hey why doesn't Heritage use the knarly-yet-effective lock washer on the inside of the Jack? I just noticed this.
    They all turn, work loose and mess up the connection. I think I might have sold Medblues my old HJS with a disconnected ground wire. If I did, I am sorry bro.
    After I put everything back together and tightened it all up, I tried the clear nail polish trick on the nut. It worked its way into the threads. I hope it holds. I'll let it dry for an hour.
    JD

  40. #39

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by 2bornot2bop
    Hey, how's about that signature!?

    I'd be interested in learning the back story on how it was a '94 HJS existed for over 20 years showing hardly any signs of wear?
    Yeah me too..
    Look at the binding. I looks like it was put on a week ago. Not even yellow.
    Heeeeeeres Johnny!
    Heritage Johnny Smith-image-jpg
    iPads suck but I love them..

  41. #40

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by 2bornot2bop
    Here's to Johnny Smith, Heritage and Gibson guitars, and a guy in love with his new guitar!

    you ever get the feeling Johnny wished he played the piano? I mean, I basically played the piano on the guitar..
    ill be offline for a couple of hours. Going down to Trenton to DeLorenzos.
    See ya guys.
    JD

  42. #41

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by Joe DeNisco
    Just had to perform a ground wire ectomy. The ground wire was disconnected. Had to solder back on.
    hey why doesn't Heritage use the knarly-yet-effective lock washer on the inside of the Jack? I just noticed this.
    They all turn, work loose and mess up the connection. I think I might have sold Medblues my old HJS with a disconnected ground wire. If I did, I am sorry bro.
    After I put everything back together and tightened it all up, I tried the clear nail polish trick on the nut. It worked its way into the threads. I hope it holds. I'll let it dry for an hour.
    JD
    Bro, their is a special tool you are suppose to use to keep the input jack from spinning if it comes loose and you need to tighten it. Otherwise you shear off the wiring. Stewmac is the cheapest. Frank Ford at Gryphon makes really nice custom made ones but $80. The Stewmac ones work good and they are like around $25. A must tool for every electric guitar player.

    Gorgeous headstock !!! and I know the signature in the F-hole is giving you a stiffy. JD is grooving. Happy days.

  43. #42

    User Info Menu

    I wonder if Maudie Moore did the trussrod cover ?

  44. #43

    User Info Menu

    Maudie did trussrod covers too. It is quite possible. You scored big time bro. How could someone buy a guitar like that and not play it for 22 years. I don't get it. Binding still bright white....I don't get it. It had to be a master plan from above. We all rejoice with you bro. Something really special just happened.

  45. #44

    User Info Menu

    I watched that hour long video again last night of JS on YouTube. He had really long fingers. To have hands like JS or TF sure would be a blessing. Hand size is a huge factor. My hands hurt just watching JS play those chords. Joe my hat goes off to you tackling his work. I hope JS's spirit dwells inside your new box.

  46. #45

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by vinnyv1k
    I watched that hour long video again last night of JS on YouTube. He had really long fingers. To have hands like JS or TF sure would be a blessing. Hand size is a huge factor. My hands hurt just watching JS play those chords. Joe my hat goes off to you tackling his work. I hope JS's spirit dwells inside your new box.
    In addition to the all the beautiful things you said about him, he was a beautiful human being. He reminds me of you bro. He reminds me of you big time.

    Quote Originally Posted by vinnyv1k
    Maudie did trussrod covers too. It is quite possible. You scored big time bro. How could someone buy a guitar like that and not play it for 22 years. I don't get it. Binding still bright white....I don't get it. It had to be a master plan from above. We all rejoice with you bro. Something really special just happened.
    The binding is what gets me too. Unless the material they used back then didn't yellow, I don't know how it stayed so perfect. And I guarantee it wasn't in the case for all those years. You can tell when a guitar was in a case for long time. The imprint of the guitar forms into the padding. This case has no imprint. The frets are perfect. The fret binding nibs are perfect with no cracks. Unless this guitar was completely refinished (which I don't think it was) then its been amazingly well cared for and sealed and not played.

    Ive played it for about 10 hours since Friday night. It is comfortable playing everything that I play Johnny, Joe, George, Grant Geissman), even Jeff Beck. It is a sweet sounding guitar. Alot like my D'A. And it plays amazingly well. Like George Benson says, It wont break down when you push it. I played hard funky rhythm's on it for backing tracks and it is rock solid. Its a really solid guitar. Its my hammer. A keeper, definitely, without a doubt, case closed end of discussion. I love it.

    Thanks Guys.
    Joe D

  47. #46

    User Info Menu

    I'll say it again, the finest guitar that Johnny Smith said he ever played was made by a private luthier, someone named Sam Koontz. A 17 inch oval hole arch top with a RC 1100 floating pick up

    A shoemaker from New Jersey, who sadly ended his life early through his own hands .

    Too bad his guitars are rarely discussed . I don't think you made too many of them, a few hundred ??

  48. #47

    User Info Menu

    just for info-

    koontz was a top guy...nj..was man behind harptone and standel guitars...very popular with the nyc-philly players..pat martino had a koontz

    here's great remembrance by jack cecchini

    Sam Koontz

    I first met Sam Koontz at a music convention in Chicago. I entered a display and someone was playing a Koontz guitar. I asked if I could try it and he answered no. At that moment a man entered the room with a nametag on his lapel that read Sam Koontz. I asked him if he had built the guitar and he said yes. I asked him if I could try it and he said sure. He took the guitar away from the player and gave it to me. I played it and asked if it was for sale. He answered yes. I asked the price and he said $700.00 dollars. I took out my checkbook and paid him. That was the first of many Koontz guitars I bought. Years later Sam said the reason he liked me was that I was the only person that never tried to get him to lower his price. Sam and I just seemed to be on the wave length and we got to be very good friends.

    Whenever he built a guitar he would call me and play it on the phone. He would go into long detailed explanations about the structural changes he had made and how it affected specific aspects of the instrument. Sam was an innovator and his guitars kept getting better each year. I sold many of his instruments to my students.

    Bill Shultz who was working for Yamaha (he later became the CEO of Fender) asked me to go touble shoot and suggest improvements for Yamaha guitars. Yamaha was having problems with their neck joints. I suggested that Sam understood production methods from working at the Harptone factory and would be the ideal person to help with production guitar problems.
    Sam was a simple man but the moment he entered the factory he became a genius. The engineers at Yamaha were in awe of him and his knowledge. I learned a great deal about guitars from Sam and at the Yamaha factory.


    Two very interesting experiences were the climate control chamber and the sound proof chamber. We would put a guitar into a humidity-controlled chamber with movement sensors all over the instrument. The sensors would reveal which parts would move first as a result of the humidity or lack of humidity and then build the instrument to compensate for the movement in that particular area. This information prevented the guitars from cracking in the specific climates of each country the guitar was shipped to.

    The sound proof chamber was a room that was elevated off the ground. The moment one entered it the strangest hearing sensation occurred. The room was totally devoid of any reverberation at all. It was a very strange and totally new hearing sensation.
    We could test the true sustain of guitars in this chamber because it was totally insulated against any kind or reverberation. We would pluck a string and time it with a stop watch and in this way we would get real information about which bracing system and which change we made improved the instruments sustaining power.

    Another important technique was to put the guitar tops in a drying room so they would shrink and glue the braces on while the top was shrunken. This technique prevented many instruments from cracking.

    Sam always built his guitars so they resonated at the pitch of A flat. Sam explained to the engineers that the cubic air content of the instrument determined its resonance. The engineers disagreed and Sam took a bucket of water and poured it into a guitar. This of course reduced the air content and changed its resonance note. The engineers had egg on their face.



    cheers

  49. #48

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by Joe DeNisco
    2b, a few years ago you asked about setup on a odd bridge that had 2 sets of 2 thumbwheels. Someone posted pictures of their Heritage Johnny Smith. I didn't forget the guitar. It looked like no other HJS that I've ever seen. It was a lot like mine. Similar shade and coloring. When I first saw my guitar, I remembered that one. I wonder if it's the same guitar? Does it ring a bell?
    Don't recall the thread it was displayed in but I definitely recall the guitar. That HJS belonged to a forum member who'd stated it was his former HJS. That HJS too had the same shading as yours. I thought of that guitar soon as I saw the shading on yours.

    Its Sunday. He'll chime in Tuesday when returning to work and viewing your post. Seems like it was wintermoon, or one of the east coast members, which took me by surprise they owned an HJS because they were a bonafide Gibson guy

  50. #49

    User Info Menu

    "Seems like it was wintermoon, or one of the east coast members, which took me by surprise they owned an HJS because they were a bonafide Gibson guy"

    wasn't me, I'm still bonafide, but I like the guitar Joe just got.

  51. #50

    User Info Menu

    was poking around and found this interesting shot of js...with guild


    caption-
    Johnny Smith plays his Guild Benedetto Signature Johnny Smith Award archtop guitar at his home in Colorado Springs, Colorado, 2003.

    Heritage Johnny Smith-112323347_137125456102-jpg

    cheers