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  1. #51

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    Having had old and new instruments and instruments from the late '90s, I can tell you that the instrument opening up is a myth as far as I'm concerned. None of my 20 year old or even my 30 year old 175 had the vibe of the '60s gibsons. At one point, I had a '57, '65, '72 and '89 175. I ended up selling the earlier ones for financial reasons but there was absolutely no comparison. And you could pick them up and understand why. Each instrument was progressively heavier than the earlier ones and when you compared the '57 to the '89, there was about a 1.5lb difference!

    The build on gibsons gets heavier and heavier to counteract warranty problems up to the modern thicknesses which probably arrived sometime in the mid to late '80s.

    The earlier instruments were just lighter and more resonant. No amount of aging can change that.

    Quote Originally Posted by vinnyv1k
    I love both old and new Archtops. I had my Guild AA and my D'Aquisto for over 30 years. My problem is where I live. No Archtop land. The risk of buying used sight unseen is of too much risk to me.
    Buying new has just as much risk as far as a good working instrument. I have bought countless new Gibson's with bad necks or trussrods that don't work.
    The difference being if new their is no risk getting your money back from a reputable dealer.
    Ebay and Reverb is not a option for me. I don't like the risk factor. Jack has had his share of headaches with both of these online sellers. In the end he always seems to overcome bad buys but not without some stress involved.
    I don't gamble. My luck is horrible.
    A new guitar will take a few years to open up I will admit. I am retired from buying finally and glad to have that stress behind me. Buying a new guitar is joyful and terrifying at the same time. Believe me when UPS drops off your new guitar your heart is pounding with excitement and fear.

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    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #52

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    but p.s. I'm not putting down shiny, new instruments. I loved my Tal Farlow. I think the BK is vibier and groovier but the Tal was a bad-ass instrument if you had never played a '60s BK.

  4. #53

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    And another thing I like about the older instruments is that their value is not reduced if they get a ding or scratch. When I had the Tal, it was in absolute mint condition and when a luthier cracked the finish at the side of the nut putting a new nut on it, I was horrified because with that type of "piece", any cosmetic defect can be counted in the $hundred$ of dollars. In fact, I bought it for $2800 or $2900 but sold it for $100 or $200 less because of the defect.

    A BK with a scratch or chip in the finish just ain't a big deal!

  5. #54

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    Mine was "very orange" when I first got it. It is now turning kind of a brownie reddish which I am happy about.
    Still that 93 has a gorgeous color for sure.
    Funny thing is the 1st time I ever saw a TF guitar I thought is was butt ugly. Now I think they ooze beauty not to mention I love how they sound and play. Long live Tal Farlow ! Both the guitar and the man's music.
    Sadly I never had the privilege to see Tal perform.

  6. #55

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    Tals are beautiful, but in Viceroy Brown they reach ultra exclusive status.
    One of the best looking guitars out there.
    2b, ITB will always be, "Im thinking of buying", to my stupid ass..
    JD

  7. #56

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    To me, the key to the Tal's visual mystique is that the visual dynamic really comes together when it's being played - the angle, the arm across the upper bout. the wrist and hand in motion, the neck hand all over the neck, all mesmerically drawing the eye to the scroll and back out again. In performance, it's a knockout. And of course a nice sunburst is like a gilt frame.
    Geez. I need a Tal!

  8. #57

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    Hey Guys,
    This is the song that changed my musical life. When I was a little bone headed 13 year old, I sat and learned this song note for note. Surprisingly, 41 years later the notes are still there. I've seen George play this song alot of times and many different ways. But to me, Breezin is best when its played just like the 1st time I heard it, simply the way it was on the record.



    I played this on Booboo. This guitar cuts through and allows me to play it and not force it. Vinny, it is starting to open up just like you said it would. I love this guitar and it is the one guitar I will never part with in my life. No way, no how.

    Thanks for looking.
    Joe DeNisco

  9. #58

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    Thanks so much, Joe. That album changed my musical life too. Just wonderful. Your playing is really great.

    And, now my desire for a Tal is becoming impossible to resist.

  10. #59

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    Memorizing a melody is one thing but a entire solo is quite a task. Bravo bro ! BooBoo sounds great !

  11. #60

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    Joe, you really make that Tal sing! Just great, man, just great.

  12. #61

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    C74, Honestly, I just sit in back of it. The Guitar does the rest. It really is so easy to play. There are no surprises. It is easy to play out with, easy to play solo and easy to play to backing tracks with. A lot of guitars get lost in the mix. Even my 175 does to some extent. The Tal is a real working mans Jazz Guitar tool. It is splendid to look at and everything else just falls into place with it.

    For those who dont have one, the Tal Farlow is the real deal guys. Get one.
    Thanks everyone!
    Joe D

  13. #62

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    Quote Originally Posted by citizenk74
    Joe, you really make that Tal sing! Just great, man, just great.
    Ken , one cannot disagree with JD's enthusiastic review, I have
    had three over the years , although laminate it gives the L5CES a good
    run for the money , but with its own unique tone. I read previously that
    you've not seen an L5CES in the flesh , which is fortunate because if you
    do encounter one , you will be gassing for one.
    Not to derail this thread, back to the OP, you will know also that a TF is
    Less than half the price of the ubiquitous L5.
    May I suggest another alternative , the Eastman AR 580ce, carved top
    which has superb appointments, and is even less $$
    I would have one ,except for its 1.75" Nut width.
    best regards
    Silverfoxx

  14. #63

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    Quote Originally Posted by silverfoxx
    Ken , one cannot disagree with JD's enthusiastic review, I have
    had three over the years , although laminate it gives the L5CES a good
    run for the money , but with its own unique tone
    .
    Silverfoxx
    That laminate tone is WHY it sounds so great. To me, the laminate sound is like the tone of Lester Young, Desmond, Coltrane, or Stan Getz---more focused, fewer overtones.

    The carved top sound is like the tone of Ben Webster, Gene Ammons, or Johnny Hodges....it "breathes" more, has more nuance, and more overtones...but in a mix, sometimes it doesn't work so well. By itself, or in a small group, it can be amazing.

  15. #64

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    Quote Originally Posted by Max405
    C74, Honestly, I just sit in back of it. The Guitar does the rest. It really is so easy to play. There are no surprises. It is easy to play out with, easy to play solo and easy to play to backing tracks with. A lot of guitars get lost in the mix. Even my 175 does to some extent. The Tal is a real working mans Jazz Guitar tool. It is splendid to look at and everything else just falls into place with it.

    For those who dont have one, the Tal Farlow is the real deal guys. Get one.
    Thanks everyone!
    Joe D
    Is a Tal similar in constuction to an ES350 like Barneys ?
    Could be perfect for me , there aren't many cheap 350's about
    Might a Tal be be slightly thinner ?

  16. #65

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    Quote Originally Posted by lawson-stone
    Joe you inspire me to go back and learn some of my favorite players' favorite performances. Honestly, until I heard you do it, it never occurred to me to learn, say, a whole Joe Pass tune on solo guitar (to the extent I could) and then make it part of my repertoire. But I think that could be a fun way to incorporate some great stuff into my playing. I doubt I'll ever be the hugely creative improvisor that I (and we all) want to be, so walking in the footsteps made by Joe Pass, Johnny Smith, Jimmy Raney, etc. could be the next best thing.

    Or as Sinatra sang, "...it'll have to do, until the real thing comes along!"

    you are a true inspiration to me.
    Lawson, thanks buddy. You are right. it is fun to be able to emulate the greats. And it absolutely will help in our ability to improvise. That's how the greats learned. By picking off runs by a trumpet player, a piano player or, Wes.. That's how we evolve.
    The way things are done around here make it an absolute pleasure to evolve. The respect shown toward one another is outstanding. We all enjoy each others contributions and it makes us all better. And it makes getting better really fun and rewarding.\
    Jazz is not easy. Thanks for helping me guys.
    Joe DeNisco

  17. #66

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    Quote Originally Posted by pingu
    Is a Tal similar in constuction to an ES350 like Barneys ?
    Could be perfect for me , there aren't many cheap 350's about
    Might a Tal be be slightly thinner ?
    Not sure what Barneys guitar measured, but the Tal is the perfect recipe, 17", 3" deep. Mucho comfortable.
    JD

  18. #67

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    Quote Originally Posted by Max405
    Not sure what Barneys guitar measured, but the Tal is the perfect recipe, 17", 3" deep. Mucho comfortable.
    JD
    I would guess that the TF is slightly thinner than a 350, plus the TF has humbuckers. The 350's (made from 46-56 all had P-90's. In 57 when Humbuckers came out, the 350 was given a short scale and a 2 1/4 inch body and was renamed the ES-350T. Later the ES-350 T was reissued with a long scale for a time and recently there have been some full depth ES-350's made by the custom shop (with P-90's).

    The TF is it's own thing, a humbucker equipped ES-350 with a slightly thinner depth and the cosmetics that sign painter Tal Farlow approved of.

    Looking at Tal's hands, I am thinking that to him, a 25.5 scale must have felt like a Byrdland to the rest of us!

  19. #68

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    Quote Originally Posted by Max405
    Not sure what Barneys guitar measured, but the Tal is the perfect recipe, 17", 3" deep. Mucho comfortable.
    JD
    The original ES350 (Barney's) had 3-3/8 rims identical to a L5. It s amazing how just 3/8 makes a world of difference in comfort.

  20. #69

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    Those plywood Byrdland's (ES350T) are going for $10k. You can get a real carved Byrdland for half that. Same goes for the early 3 knob ES350's. You can get a L5 for half the price. I don't get it. I had a 1993 reissue ES350T long scale.
    The TF guitar sounds way better IMO. I still would love a old 3 knob ES350. Very cool axe.

  21. #70

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    Hi Guys,
    Whenever I play this guitar, I wonder why I play anything else.
    Boo-Boo can really do it all. When I pick it up, I look down at the neck and immediately think, "Oh yeah, these strings are gonna buzz.." And they never do. Laser straight neck, the lowest action you can imagine. The guitar really does play itself.
    When I play the Tal, It re-emphasizes why someday, I will have another L5 Wes.
    I tried something different. I recorded the Guitar using only my Mixer and my Computer. So the guitar is not amplified, Volume and tone on the guitar are set to 10 and the settings on the Mixer EQ are at 0. So, its pure guitar and nothing but the guitar.
    Joe D


  22. #71

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    Nicely played Joe. Love the low D.

    Cheers.

  23. #72

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    Nothing brings on an ear-to-ear grin like a Joe D. video, and this is no exception. Nice playing, Man! That Tal looks good on you, too. What a toneful guitar. As to why you play anything else, I think it's cause you can.

  24. #73

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    What K said.

    16 inch, 17 inch and 18 inch Archtops all have their own sound. We need different tools for different jobs. And every fine jazz guitarist (like yourself) needs an L-5. you WILL have another L-5. I would bet on it.

  25. #74

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    Quote Originally Posted by Stringswinger
    What K said.

    16 inch, 17 inch and 18 inch Archtops all have their own sound. We need different tools for different jobs. And every fine jazz guitarist (like yourself) needs an L-5. you WILL have another L-5. I would bet on it.
    Yes one of mine. Anyone that thumbs there nose at a Tal Farlow model is simply because they never owned one. One of the best guitars on the planet period. LOL getting one now though sadly. Nice playing bro.

  26. #75

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    Joe. a very nice video, Tenderly sounding particularly good on the TF
    I love the drop D also, The lack of popularity of the TF has
    always puzzled me, it's like a poor relation to the Archtops
    but depending on who is playing it !!...........it can sound like
    an L5, thanks for posting this, such a relaxing tune. As it has
    been said many times. If we could have only one guitar the TF
    is a leading contender.