View Poll Results: 1 pickup or 2 on a Gibson ES 175

Voters
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  • 1 pickup

    83 56.08%
  • 2 pickup

    65 43.92%
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  1. #51

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    Amazing result. I thought that most of the comments on this subject were pro 2 pickups but the poll says that the 1 pu ES-175 would be more popular about 60/40.

    I hope that the Gibson headquarters read this thread!

    (Make them w/ a P90 too!)

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  3. #52

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    Quote Originally Posted by Herbie
    Amazing result. I thought that most of the comments on this subject were pro 2 pickups but the poll says that the 1 pu ES-175 would be more popular about 60/40.

    I hope that the Gibson headquarters read this thread!

    (Make them w/ a P90 too!)
    Unfortunately the voters were not that many. The thread has been around for many days and has received only 119 votes, so far. I don't think Gibson would be convinced to review their policies on the basis of such a little number of preferences. I expect that if the poll had been submitted to The Gear Page Forum, the result would have been different.

  4. #53

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    I've had two ES-175Ds: the first was a late 70s sunburst with neck volute; my 55th Anniversary Edition is in natural and highly figured. I find two pickups to be nothing but advantageous. Indispensable for backing singers, comping, and soloing. Any guitar good enough for Jimmy Nolen and Joe Pass is ok by me.

  5. #54

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    You gotta have a bridge pickup... otherwise... what would the two extra knobs control?

  6. #55

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    My 1957...

    One or Two Pickups on a Gibson ES-175?-es-175-1957-jpg

  7. #56

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    Quote Originally Posted by losaltosjoe
    My 1957...

    One or Two Pickups on a Gibson ES-175?-es-175-1957-jpg
    I have seen perfection. Now I can die in peace.

    Way later though, I hope!

  8. #57

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    For my purposes, I prefer the two pickup model due to the additional tonal flexibility. You probably give up some acoustic sound, but everything is a compromise. I used to own a 1956 model with two P-90s and currently own a 1970 with two humbuckers. I also own a 1961 Epiphone Century (thin hollowbody non cutaway) with one neck P-90. It has surprising acoustic sound.

  9. #58

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    Quote Originally Posted by RobbieAG
    For my purposes, I prefer the two pickup model due to the additional tonal flexibility. You probably give up some acoustic sound, but everything is a compromise.
    The same applies to me, it is better to operate two different pickups than to commit to a certain sound.

  10. #59

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    Can I change my vote? I voted single pickup. But I just changed my position on this important subject. Here is why:

    I removed the bridge pickup on my ES 175 a few months ago. It got more resonant but there is just a bit too much attack in the high mids. Nice when played fingerstyle but through the amp it sounds quite a bit "harder".

    So I cut a matching poplar piece for the bridge pickup hole and fitted snug to the hole to test. It only made it more resonant. Sometimes added too much throaty bass, sometimes extenuated the attack, especially the mids, depending on how it fitted.

    I also played an ES 165 recently. It had that same throaty bass I had when I covered the hole with the poplar piece. It's not a bad sound, I just prefer the more mellowed out sound you get when the bridge pickup is preventing the extra resonance. I'm gonna put the bridge pickup back.

    So if I could change my vote, I'd now go with 2 pickups.

  11. #60

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    Tal,

    L5 players notice a similar effect when switching between single and double mounted pickup models.

  12. #61

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tal_175
    Can I change my vote? I voted single pickup. But I just changed my position on this important subject. Here is why:

    I removed the bridge pickup on my ES 175 a few months ago. It got more resonant but there is just a bit too much attack in the high mids. Nice when played fingerstyle but through the amp it sounds quite a bit "harder".

    So I cut a matching poplar piece for the bridge pickup hole and fitted snug to the hole to test. It only made it more resonant. Sometimes added too much throaty bass, sometimes extenuated the attack, especially the mids, depending on how it fitted.

    I also played an ES 165 recently. It had that same throaty bass I had when I covered the hole with the poplar piece. It's not a bad sound, I just prefer the more mellowed out sound you get when the bridge pickup is preventing the extra resonance. I'm gonna put the bridge pickup back.

    So if I could change my vote, I'd now go with 2 pickups.
    Years ago I acquired a single PUP 1967 175. At the time, I also had a 1977 175. Both were equipped with T-top PUPs. The 67 had a slightly harsher tone. I figured that the reason Herb Eliis and Jim Hall got a smoother tone from their single PUP 175's was because they had PAF's rather than T-Tops in their guitars.

    Recently, I acquired an L-5CES. Comparing it to my L-5-WESMO, I can hear a similar high end difference. The dampening of the top by the second PUP does make a tonal difference. The added tonal control that the second PUP brings to the table along with the slightly warmer tone outweighs the possible rattles that the second PUP brings to the equation, IMO.

    The difference on the L-5 is not as stark, probably due to the warming factor of the carved spruce top vs. the laminate maple. And in Wes Montgomery's case, being that he used his thumb rather than a plectrum, he probably liked the added high end that the single PUP'ed guitar brought to his sound.

    All of this said, there is nothing wrong with a single PUP 175 or L-5, and with the tone control, a desired tone can certainly be had. But for those of us who play in various venues (where dark rooms sometimes are a problem), the added tonal control of a second PUP still makes the two PUP version of the 175 the better choice.

  13. #62

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    I had a gig the other day where I used a champ (duo with bass), dynamics were hard to control with the extra resonance through a class A amp.
    The interesting thing is single pickup version actually sounds really good played with fingers (better than with the bridge pickup). The high mid attack and fingers really balance each other out. But I could not find a soft enough pick to make it work for me with picks.