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  1. #1826

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    Playing is stellar as always, although I, personally, like a more mellow tone. You know I'm a Tele fanatic and pretty much a purist (it even makes me nervous to put a humbucker in one) so I'll not get involved in the 'looks' discussion other than to say it is a pretty guitar, notwithstanding the shape.

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    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #1827

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Soloway
    Not traditional but undoubtedly a Tele in its musical soul. It's a joy to play but I forget how different it is playing a Tele neck pickup.

    That’s so sweet! The type of sound, the chords, the playing.
    I’m going to try to approach that sound on my Yamaha 10c.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  4. #1828

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Soloway
    Not traditional but undoubtedly a Tele in its musical soul. It's a joy to play but I forget how different it is playing a Tele neck pickup.

    That’s so sweet! The type of sound, the chords, the playing.
    I’m going to try to approach that sound on my Yamaha 10c.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  5. #1829

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    What sort of neck pick up do you have there?

  6. #1830

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bach5G
    What sort of neck pick up do you have there?
    Is that directed at me? If so, both the pickups are in-house from Vola. It's a fairly traditional Tele neck pickup, true single coil voiced a bit on the brighter side. The bridge pickup is much more radical but I don't use it much and even then only in combination with the neck pickup.

  7. #1831

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    Came across this builder recently on Reverb; in Nashville: Ricardo Sanchez. Great prices for handmade instruments!

    I like this!

    Telecaster Love Thread, No Archtops Allowed-ricardo-s-jpg

  8. #1832

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    Looks like a great source for nice features and good prices.

  9. #1833

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    I took my Tele into the master for a new nut and a set up. I threw a set of strings into the gig bag.

    I picked it up today. Where did these flats come from? I guess I grabbed the wrong set of strings.

    These sound pretty good. Real good.

  10. #1834
    my second LSL, my first Telecaster ever ... "Julieanne" - one piece sugar pine body, cryo tuned ...

    very sweet guitar, in the house for a couple of weeks only, it had to leave today unfortunately, to make way

    for something else, that is even more exciting.


    bye bye Julieanne, I will always love you , sad to see you leaving ...






  11. #1835

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    "Cryo tuned?"

    Dunno about that specific guitar, but nice amp collection!

  12. #1836
    cryo tuning, done by George Forester ... they cool down the entire guitar to -190° Celsius.

    I bought the guitar with the treatment done, it is not all cheap at ~400 Euros ...

    the sweetest Amp is out of sight to the left ...


  13. #1837

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    Here's a tele built from scratch by Erik Hansen of Hansen Kustoms. I now have two of these and will be selling one soon enough. The total weight is 5 3/4 pounds, due to the Paulownia body.




    I'll probably hold onto the Sea Foam Green one - it has the whopper neck. Surf's Up!
    Last edited by Hammertone; 05-18-2021 at 04:21 AM.

  14. #1838

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    Just finished this one for a customer. Not the lightest thing in the world with all that hardware on it, but it's a really nice guitar nonetheless. Hooray for Fiesta Red!


  15. #1839
    Nice. What bridge is that in post 377?
    Last edited by El Jazzbo Lobo; 05-30-2021 at 02:47 AM.

  16. #1840
    Don't know if they're all that way, but the one in the foreground looks to have a thicker-than-standard body thickness...maybe 2"+. What brand are they? Do you know if they were solid or chambered?

  17. #1841

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    Quote Originally Posted by El Jazzbo Lobo View Post
    Nice. What bridge is that?
    Quote Originally Posted by El Jazzbo Lobo View Post
    Don't know if they're all that way, but the one in the foreground looks to have a thicker-than-standard body thickness...maybe 2"+. What brand are they? Do you know if they were solid or chambered?
    Regarding which guitar in which post#?
    Last edited by Hammertone; 05-29-2021 at 05:43 AM.

  18. #1842
    oh, dang. I'm used to TDPRI where it links the source post when you reply directly to it. I'll have to look back and see if I can find them.

  19. #1843

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    Question:

    I see very different configurations passing by in this thread. SC's, HB-ers, different brands, different hardware.
    Fender has strats and tele's. Different shape, both SC's. Why does a strat sound different form a tele?

    What makes a tele a tele?

    I don't mean this filosofically. When people refer to the sound of a tele, what is it that makes this sound? Is it the typical lipstick SC? Is it the typical bridge?

  20. #1844

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    Quote Originally Posted by Marcel_A View Post
    Question:

    I see very different configurations passing by in this thread. SC's, HB-ers, different brands, different hardware.
    Fender has strats and tele's. Different shape, both SC's. Why does a strat sound different form a tele?

    What makes a tele a tele?

    I don't mean this filosofically. When people refer to the sound of a tele, what is it that makes this sound? Is it the typical lipstick SC? Is it the typical bridge?
    The Tele was Leo's first production model and was unique in every way. His bridge design with that rather large piece of thin metal and the single coil pickup mounted directly onto it
    makes for THAT twangy + trebly Tele tone. The neck pickup is also a single coil albeit with a metal cover which colors/softens the tone in a specific way.
    The first version of the Tele (very early 50's) had a bridge pickup that was wound a little hotter and these original "Blackguard" Teles (some are called "Nocaster" for the omission of the model name on the headstock) and are the most sought after models - along with the early Esquire and Broadcaster (single pickup) models. If you're after the screaming Roy Buchanan type of Tele tone then a Blackguard would be your holy grail - for the Ted Greene/Ed Bickert CLEAN tone you'd be using the neck pickup exclusively and that tone can be achieved with pretty much all of the later versions without much difficulties. Since any pickup can only pick up the vibrations of the string the construction of the whole guitar and the resulting vibration-characteristics is just as important : without this specific bridge design the Tele will sound quite different.

    The Strat otoh has 3 identical pickups mounted onto a plastic pickguard and the bridge is a new and different design also. No metal covers on the pickups. The shape of the body has no real influence on the tone of the guitar but the choice of wood definitely has. Playing in a seated position the Tele is more comfortable for many players

    The tonal differences are quite apparent, you hear this at once even when you play each model unplugged.

  21. #1845

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    Quote Originally Posted by El Jazzbo Lobo View Post
    oh, dang. I'm used to TDPRI where it links the source post when you reply directly to it. I'll have to look back and see if I can find them.

  22. #1846

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    Quote Originally Posted by gitman View Post
    The Tele was Leo's first production model and was unique in every way. His bridge design with that rather large piece of thin metal and the single coil pickup mounted directly onto it
    makes for THAT twangy + trebly Tele tone. The neck pickup is also a single coil albeit with a metal cover which colors/softens the tone in a specific way.
    The first version of the Tele (very early 50's) had a bridge pickup that was wound a little hotter and these original "Blackguard" Teles (some are called "Nocaster" for the omission of the model name on the headstock) and are the most sought after models - along with the early Esquire and Broadcaster (single pickup) models. If you're after the screaming Roy Buchanan type of Tele tone then a Blackguard would be your holy grail - for the Ted Greene/Ed Bickert CLEAN tone you'd be using the neck pickup exclusively and that tone can be achieved with pretty much all of the later versions without much difficulties. Since any pickup can only pick up the vibrations of the string the construction of the whole guitar and the resulting vibration-characteristics is just as important : without this specific bridge design the Tele will sound quite different.

    The Strat otoh has 3 identical pickups mounted onto a plastic pickguard and the bridge is a new and different design also. No metal covers on the pickups. The shape of the body has no real influence on the tone of the guitar but the choice of wood definitely has. Playing in a seated position the Tele is more comfortable for many players

    The tonal differences are quite apparent, you hear this at once even when you play each model unplugged.
    Admirably stated - detailed and yet concise. Kudos!

  23. #1847

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    Quote Originally Posted by Marcel_A View Post
    ...What makes a tele a tele?
    Quote Originally Posted by gitman View Post
    Since any pickup can only pick up the vibrations of the string the construction of the whole guitar and the resulting vibration-characteristics is just as important : without this specific bridge design the Tele will sound quite different.
    Hooray for physics! I agree - traditional tele bridge w/tele bridge pickup is the main item.
    Without that, guitars can look like telecasters, but do not sound like telecasters.
    Teles with shorter-scale or conversion necks sound less like teles but can still sound reasonably tele-like if they use the traditional tele bridge/pickup design.
    But no one actually cares about any of this except for a bunch of nerdlingers. Out in the real world, if it resembles the overall shape of a tele, it's called a tele.


  24. #1848

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    You tele lovers ever played around with the Fender Mod Shop tool? I'm curious what features and specifications you all would choose if asked to build the best Jazz telecaster you could from the site?

    Telecaster | Mod Shop

  25. #1849

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    Nerdlingers?

    The shape of the body would possibly also have an effect on the tone of the guitar in a couple of different ways. One of them is going to be mass; the Telecaster body has more mass than the Stratocaster body when made from the same kind of wood with the same specific gravity. That's going to affect tone.


    Another way in which tone might be affected is the transmission of vibrations through the wood. A Telecaster has two large parallel surfaces- the front and back- which conceivably could allow vibrations to pass through the wood and reflect off the back and back up to the top (and vice versa). Rick Turner talks about this regarding the body shape of the Model One, which was in turn inspired by a much earlier guitar from the 1800s. The Stratocaster, with its much more irregular shape, is going to have less of that. But I'm not a physicist so that could well be wrong. I am thinking back to high school physics class with wave tanks.

  26. #1850

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cunamara View Post
    Nerdlingers?

    The shape of the body would possibly also have an effect on the tone of the guitar in a couple of different ways. One of them is going to be mass; the Telecaster body has more mass than the Stratocaster body when made from the same kind of wood with the same specific gravity. That's going to affect tone.


    Another way in which tone might be affected is the transmission of vibrations through the wood. A Telecaster has two large parallel surfaces- the front and back- which conceivably could allow vibrations to pass through the wood and reflect off the back and back up to the top (and vice versa). Rick Turner talks about this regarding the body shape of the Model One, which was in turn inspired by a much earlier guitar from the 1800s. The Stratocaster, with its much more irregular shape, is going to have less of that. But I'm not a physicist so that could well be wrong. I am thinking back to high school physics class with wave tanks.
    This. I see the Fender-type instrument as having one basic node (the neck bolt area) and innumerable sub-nodes. The neck itself will have its own basic resonance (complicated a bit if laminated with rosewood) and the lighter per cubic inch body will have its own series of peaks and valleys which will, depending on their phase, reinforce or lessen the effect of the combination. Add vibrato, and you get a comb-filter effect. In the Strat this is enhanced by the built-in reverb tank with its multiple springs and adjustable tension. Magic, indeed!