View Poll Results: Which one?

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  • Gibson

    52 29.89%
  • Sadowsky

    26 14.94%
  • Collings

    23 13.22%
  • Others (ibanez, yamaha, heritage, etc)

    73 41.95%
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Posts 101 to 112 of 112
  1. #101

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    I have owned (and still own my '63) several early/late 60's Gibson Es-345 model guitars and it' still my favorite - however, if I were in the market for a high quality semi TODAY then I'd probably couldn't get past a Collings I35 or Soco. I've played an early I35 with the brazilian board and solid wood construction a couple of years ago and that guitar was absolutely wonderful, in all aspects. Did everything I want in a semihollow (I come from the BB King/Carlton school of tone....) and then some. The resale value is also excellent, seems to do better than your average Gibson reissues.

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    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #102

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    Played a Godin single cut thin body (with block) today at GC that I thought was worth consdering. Maybe pricey at about $2k. My Comins is less money and also a very nice guitar in the same general type.

  4. #103

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    If I had the dough, I'd get a Collings I-35LC with Throbaks and never look back. Something about the tone just hits me perfectly for a 335-style, and the slightly-smaller body would be a plus for me.


  5. #104

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    I bought a Samick Greg Bennett Royale 3 many years ago, still the best semi I've ever played, $450 brand new.

  6. #105

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    I have a '64(?) Gibson ES-345 traptail with VariTone, gold plated patent-sticker humbuckers, stereo output, and the most variety of tones I've ever heard. With a pair of blackface Deluxe Reverbs in stereo mode, the sound is simply awesome. There are many fine variations on the classic 33x platform. For me, the original is still the best.
    "Often imitated, never exceeded" sums it up for me.

  7. #106

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    Quote Originally Posted by citizenk74
    I have a '64(?) Gibson ES-345 traptail with VariTone, gold plated patent-sticker humbuckers, stereo output, and the most variety of tones I've ever heard. With a pair of blackface Deluxe Reverbs in stereo mode, the sound is simply awesome. There are many fine variations on the classic 33x platform. For me, the original is still the best.
    I'm really curious about stereo guitars; I can't imagine the sound of the 2 pick-ups separated - that's how it works, no? I wanted to try it with a Rickenbacker 620 at the musicshop, but they wouldn't let me.

    And re. 335, it's true that every time I hear those clean, there's an odd extra bit of 'woodyness' to the tone; unless I'm imagining it. Still, variations on the type can shine in their own right. There's an Ibanez model, 73 I think it was, that lay somewhere between Gibson's earthy 'plunky' and Gretsch's open sparkly sound; really very nice!

  8. #107

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    Quote Originally Posted by Zina
    I'm really curious about stereo guitars; I can't imagine the sound of the 2 pick-ups separated - that's how it works, no? I wanted to try it with a Rickenbacker 620 at the musicshop, but they wouldn't let me.

    And re. 335, it's true that every time I hear those clean, there's an odd extra bit of 'woodyness' to the tone; unless I'm imagining it. Still, variations on the type can shine in their own right. There's an Ibanez model, 73 I think it was, that lay somewhere between Gibson's earthy 'plunky' and Gretsch's open sparkly sound; really very nice!
    Yes, that is how it works. Each pickup gets at least a dedicated channel or ideally a dedicated amp. I have used both configurations but prefer two amps. Our home had a room that was more or less cubic. I placed the Deluxe Reverbs along the corner-to-corner axis about four feet apart and adjusted the amps for similar tone/volume. I then adjusted the guitars' tone/volumes so that each pickup was in a similar range. I added reverb to taste. The resulting sound was nothing short of glorious. Toss in a little mis- matched tremolo and it's mind-bending. It leaves conventional chorus in the dust.

    Of course, it's impractical for most stage applications for space considerations, but un-paralleled for personal indulgence. The music shop was missing a bet by not keeping a full set-up (two amps) on the floor.
    Last edited by citizenk74; 12-07-2019 at 08:18 PM. Reason: Grrramar

  9. #108

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    That's great citizenk74. I would love to have heard it. I did that once in a room with 2 amps and a stereo output Leslie simulator pedal. Slow speed was incredible as the sound spun around the room, but the fast speed was debilitating!!

  10. #109

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    ...for me anyway, it's more 'what's the right instrument for my goals?'. I had the chance to buy several really nice Gibson ESX over the years and came very close to buying one, but it turned out to have some structural defects. I looked at a lot of similar guitars after that.

    So after all my comparison shopping I found an Epiphone Sheraton II, mint condition, way heavier (it's the one with the internal block) but just right in every other way, and something I would not cry over if it were damaged or stolen. When I need a jazz, blues, or just plain acoustic/electric sound (classical is my default these days), this is what I play, and it sounds great through whatever I plug it into. $400USD on the used market got me one of the best overall values of all my instruments. Highly recommended. But it is a bit heavy.

  11. #110

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    stereo guitar, while set up intensive, is one of the great sounds...a gibson 345 or 355..and/or stereo rics (like the 360)...split the signal so that neck pup goes to one amp..and bridge pup to another...which leaves great possibilities...a stereo neck pup sent to a dual showman with 2 15" speaker cabs and the bridge pup to a fender twin reverb!! insane massive tone!!!...huge!!..

    there are also some stereo guitars, that rather than split the signal between the 2 pickups, actually split the pickups themselves..so that the low 3 strings go thru one amp and the high 3 to another..gretsch did this early on..also great

    with the right amps and speaker cabs set up, can be a mindboggling sound



    cheers

  12. #111

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    Quote Originally Posted by neatomic
    stereo guitar, while set up intensive, is one of the great sounds...a gibson 345 or 355..and/or stereo rics (like the 360)...split the signal so that neck pup goes to one amp..and bridge pup to another...which leaves great possibilities...a stereo neck pup sent to a dual showman with 2 15" speaker cabs and the bridge pup to a fender twin reverb!! insane massive tone!!!...huge!!..

    there are also some stereo guitars, that rather than split the signal between the 2 pickups, actually split the pickups themselves..so that the low 3 strings go thru one amp and the high 3 to another..gretsch did this early on..also great

    with the right amps and speaker cabs set up, can be a mindboggling sound



    cheers
    I’ve never heard about splitting pickups between different amps this way before. It sounds really interesting. Do you have any videos where this technique is used?
    Last edited by Bbmaj7#5#9; 12-08-2019 at 02:45 PM.

  13. #112

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    Here's a nice out-of-the-usual. Cool walnut color like Gibson's. No affiliation whatsoever, other than being a fan of Carvin/Kiesel gits.

    Carvin SH225 1983 Walnut | RockstarScotty's Gear Locker | Reverb

    Semihollow battle... Collings, sadowsky, Gibson ES... What would you get and why?-carvin-semi-jpg