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  1. #1

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    Just bought some. Best polish that I have ever used on nitro by far and I have tried them all. Their cleaner works great on arm haze and sweat. No abrasives. Liquid gold IMO. A bit pricey like TI's and L5's but once you buy it you are very glad you did. Best price I have found is at Reverb. Really impressed me.

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    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #2

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    The best stuff I've ever used!! period!!

  4. #3

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    I used this stuff on my nitro guitars for years. The best!
    _____________________________________________
    "When the chord changes, you should change" Joe Pass

  5. #4

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    great stuff and a bottle lasts forever.
    I almost always use the polish, rarely use the cleaner, a bit too abrasive for most jobs.

  6. #5

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    Didn't like it... tasted horrible.
    Seeking beauty and truth through six strings.

  7. #6

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    "Didn't like it... tasted horrible"

    Got the mix wrong.....

    1/3 cup Virtuoso
    2/3 cup water
    1 shot Jim Beam

  8. #7
    best of all you can become a virtuoso without practicing, just use the polish!

  9. #8

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    It's kind of pricey. Any reason why it would be better than Meginar's when an abrasive is called for and Zymol for polish?
    Hell is full of musical amateurs - George Bernard Shaw

  10. #9

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    Oh Vinny, haven't I thought you anything?
    Menzerna Powerlock.. Come on bro.

  11. #10
    Sorry Joe tried the Menzerna and though it is very great stuff the Virtuoso is better on nitro IMO. I did use the Powelock on my car. Shiniest car on my block for sure. The Virtuoso makes your guitar neck slicker than the Valdez oil spill and stays that way for a very long time. I used to use S100 Carnuaba wax for that real slick neck feel but the Virtuoso blows that away too. Nothing worse than a sticky funky neck. The Virtuoso will make your guitar neck the fasted neck in the west or in your case Joe the east. Just make sure you have a pair of sunglasses on hand when you are done using it. What caught my interest on this stuff is the fact that it was designed for use on nitrocellulose instrument lacquer. Comparing it to Gibson polish is like comparing a Epiphone Joe Pass to a Gibson L5CES.
    Last edited by vinnyv1k; 06-09-2015 at 09:31 PM.

  12. #11

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    Polish is not wax; wax is not polish. Polish shines; wax protects.

  13. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by vinnyv1k View Post
    Sorry Joe tried the Menzerna and though it is very great stuff the Virtuoso is better on nitro IMO. I did use the Powelock on my car. Shiniest car on my block for sure. The Virtuoso makes your guitar neck slicker than the Valdez oil spill and stays that way for a very long time. I used to use S100 Carnuaba wax for that real slick neck feel but the Virtuoso blows that away too. Nothing worse than a sticky funky neck. The Virtuoso will make your guitar neck the fasted neck in the west or in your case Joe the east. Just make sure you have a pair of sunglasses on hand when you are done using it. What caught my interest on this stuff is the fact that it was designed for use on nitrocellulose instrument lacquer. Comparing it to Gibson polish is like comparing a Epiphone Joe Pass to a Gibson L5CES.
    Alright so maybe you taught me something.. AGAIN
    ill try it for sure..
    sorry you didn't like the powerlock.

  14. #13

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    Virtuoso polish is great for nitro finish (I believe it was designed specifically for nitro).

    The neck on my Gibson 175 had some bad cloudy patches for years, then during some hot weather last year it started getting really sticky and nasty to play. It got so bad that bits of waxy brown stuff were actually coming out of the wood if I wiped it with a cloth.

    So I ordered the Virtuoso polish, and it completely fixed it. It got rid of all the sticky feel, and put a pretty good sheen back on the neck. As for the rest of the guitar, it shone up like new.
    Last edited by grahambop; 06-10-2015 at 11:32 AM.

  15. #14

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    Is this the product under discussion?

    http://www.amazon.com/Virtuoso-Instr...+Guitar+polish

    $13.48 for 4 oz does seem steep but .................. I think our instruments deserve a lot of love.

  16. #15

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    No issues on poly?

  17. #16
    Nothing hurts poly.

  18. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by jazzimprov View Post
    No issues on poly?
    I think it works on poly too, but there may be cheaper alternatives for that. The point with nitro is that it not only polishes it, but sorts out problems with the finish.

    You don't need to use much to get good results.

  19. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by vinnyv1k View Post
    Nothing hurts poly.
    Except perhaps, for Captain Jack Sparrow?
    "Talent is a pursued interest; anything that you're willing to practice, you can do." - Bob Ross

  20. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by Michael M View Post
    Is this the product under discussion?

    http://www.amazon.com/Virtuoso-Instr...+Guitar+polish

    $13.48 for 4 oz does seem steep but .................. I think our instruments deserve a lot of love.
    Yes that's the stuff I've got. You just put a small blob on, wipe it around with a clean cloth, then buff it off again with a clean part of the cloth. They say you should not apply it with a part of the cloth that you've used before, because it will expel the gunk off the cloth, and you'll be rubbing it back onto the guitar. So always use a clean bit.

  21. #20
    Hey Joe....your black L5 glows like a 200w bulb now. After you use this stuff you wonder why it is only $13.00 for the small little bottle. You know me, I am critical and not easily impressed. You can tell the 1st time you use this stuff that nitrocellulose loves this stuff. I too had a cloudy spot on the neck of my 175. After one application it is completely gone and slicker than snot. I am kind of thinking this stuff may really help prevent checking too just by the way the nitro feels after you use it. That of course is just a Vinny theory though. TI flats and Virtuoso polish will always be in my arsenal.
    Marc has been using this stuff for a long time and he plays DA's. I came late to the party.

  22. #21

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    Virtuoso does not seem to be sold here locally. Does anyone know how it compares to Music Nomad guitar polish (which I haven't tried yet either)?
    Richard

  23. #22
    You have to get Virtuoso online. I tried the Nomad stuff and didn't like it. It also had a heavy perfume smell to it. The Nomad probably works well on poly.

  24. #23

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    Arm haze! I didn't know there was a word for it, but that's exactly what I'm getting since I've been playing my new 175. I get it everytime I play it seems. It wipes off with polish. Should I be cleaning it off with polish everytime or is it like a once a week thing?
    White belt
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  25. #24

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    Quote Originally Posted by vinnyv1k View Post
    You have to get Virtuoso online. I tried the Nomad stuff and didn't like it. It also had a heavy perfume smell to it. The Nomad probably works well on poly.
    Thanks! The heavy perfume smell would be a huge turn off for me! Plus all my guitars have a nitro finish.
    Richard

  26. #25

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    I have a 72 Gibson Les Paul which seems to be exhibiting the finish issues described. I've used Martin Guitar Polish and another popular brand with cleaner and a Carnuba based wax. I still have the dull spots where the ravages of age have left their mark.
    The question is, is the finish on my LP nitro or other? Have not been able to find a spec for that year.


    Thanks in advance.

  27. #26

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    Quote Originally Posted by vinnyv1k View Post
    Hey Joe....your black L5 glows like a 200w bulb now. After you use this stuff you wonder why it is only $13.00 for the small little bottle. You know me, I am critical and not easily impressed. You can tell the 1st time you use this stuff that nitrocellulose loves this stuff. I too had a cloudy spot on the neck of my 175. After one application it is completely gone and slicker than snot. I am kind of thinking this stuff may really help prevent checking too just by the way the nitro feels after you use it. That of course is just a Vinny theory though. TI flats and Virtuoso polish will always be in my arsenal.
    Marc has been using this stuff for a long time and he plays DA's. I came late to the party.
    Vinny theories are legendary bro. I use the voodoo TI string change Vinny theory and I swear by it. I'll keep listening and learning.. Thanks Vinny.
    You are always trying to help around here. You're in my "Gallery of the Greats".. I'm sure everyone else feels that way too..

  28. #27

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    Quote Originally Posted by Al Br. View Post
    I have a 72 Gibson Les Paul which seems to be exhibiting the finish issues described. I've used Martin Guitar Polish and another popular brand with cleaner and a Carnuba based wax. I still have the dull spots where the ravages of age have left their mark.
    The question is, is the finish on my LP nitro or other? Have not been able to find a spec for that year.


    Thanks in advance.
    I was under the impression that most old Gibsons are nitro, but I'm no expert on this.

  29. #28

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    Quote Originally Posted by Eddie Lang View Post
    Virtuoso does not seem to be sold here locally. Does anyone know how it compares to Music Nomad guitar polish (which I haven't tried yet either)?
    Unlike Vinny's experience, I've had great success with Nomad Pro Strength Polish. I've used it on an Eastman 910, Gibson 175, Heritage 535. It did a great job of buffing out marks in the finish, highly recommend it. I have not tried Virtuoso, seems comparable to me.

  30. #29

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    Virtuoso is by far the best polish/cleaner I've tried. I've gotten impressive results with it. I have '63 gretsch Tennessean that I've had for about 25 years. I'm pretty sure it had never been polished. I myself tried the Martin polish on it many years ago but it did basically nothing. The virtuoso cleaned away 50 years of grime like a charm. I did have to use the cleaner 3 or 4 times though before it really started to shine. Other guitars didn't need more than one application. Great product and definitely worth the price.

  31. #30
    All Gibsons are nitro.

  32. #31

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    just to keep this thread from getting too boring, doesn't anybody here like Dunlop 65? One of the local luthiers swears by it so I got some . . . pretty good results IMO.

    Though this thread has me virtuoso intrigued . . . I mean, with a name like that I expect my guitars to look better & I might even play better too!

  33. #32

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    And just because I like being the guy who stirs the pot:

    Legend Guitar Polish .

  34. #33

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    Dunlop is good...but it will not remove any haze on the guitar. I know I tried it. A luthier finally buffed it away.
    "Ahhh - those Jazz guys are just makin' that stuff up!" - Homer Simpson

    "Anyone who understands Jazz knows that you can't understand it. It's too complicated. That's what's so simple about it." - Yogi Berra

  35. #34

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    For UK members, there is an importer in Manchester: Virtuoso Polish | theguitarrepairworkshop.com

    I have no connection with them - just found them online.

  36. #35

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    I actually have possibly the oldest guitar on this forum. It comes from the 1760s! I'm not sure what varnish was used back then. If anyone has an idea, please let me know.

  37. #36

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rob MacKillop View Post
    For UK members, there is an importer in Manchester: Virtuoso Polish | theguitarrepairworkshop.com

    I have no connection with them - just found them online.
    That's where I got mine from.

  38. #37

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rob MacKillop View Post
    I actually have possibly the oldest guitar on this forum. It comes from the 1760s! I'm not sure what varnish was used back then. If anyone has an idea, please let me know.
    Hi Rob,
    1760's wow. Can you show us a picture? I don't think I've ever seen a stringed instrument that old. It must be amazing.
    Joe D.

  39. #38

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    It's what is commonly these days referred to as an English Guitar, but that's not what it was called in the 1760s, when it was called a Guittar - correct spelling. I have a website devoted to the Scottish Guittar: The 18th-Century Scottish Wire-Strung "Guittar" | Rob MacKillop

    Virtuoso Guitar polish-robguitt-jpg
    Virtuoso Guitar polish-guittfront-jpgVirtuoso Guitar polish-guittback-jpgVirtuoso Guitar polish-guittheid-jpg

    It could do with a clean, but I've no way of knowing what kind of varnish was used.

    Here's an album that I had out 15 years ago - no longer on release, though the odd CD can be found here and there.


  40. #39

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    They have a weird pegbox mechanism don't they? I've seen it in a book somewhere, and I can see it in one of your photos. Some kind of key and ratchet system to tension each string.

    I wonder why they used such a complicated method?

  41. #40

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    That is amazing Rob.
    To think of all the amazing things that guitar has lived through. Even when the wood was a baby tree. A longstanding historical piece of the earth that was fashioned into an instrument that has been making music for 255 years. I cant even wrap my Brain around that.
    That would be the only Guitar (or Guittar) that I would own that I would absolutely not clean. In fact, I would pay Jane Seymour and Elizabeth Hurley to fondle it and then put it in a glass case for the next 255 years!
    Amazing. I cant thank you enough. Very Cool.
    Joe D.

  42. #41

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rob MacKillop View Post
    I actually have possibly the oldest guitar on this forum. It comes from the 1760s! I'm not sure what varnish was used back then. If anyone has an idea, please let me know.
    Wonder what amps they were using in those times? Huh, makes you think..

  43. #42

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    Quote Originally Posted by Teddyfm View Post
    Wonder what amps they were using in those times? Huh, makes you think..
    The most popular was the 'Club'.

    You used to hit the audience with it until they shut up enough to hear you properly.

  44. #43

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    Graham - that is watch-key tuning, and is the most accurate tuning system I've ever used. Unfortunately the neck is a little warped, so its accuracy is not fully appreciated.

    Joe - I've had it for 15 years, and haven't cleaned it yet. I might never. But I would like to know what varnish they used.

    Teddy - you know, I never thought of that! LOL.

    Anyway, I don't want to derail the thread. Back to Virtuoso varnish!

  45. #44
    In those days it was most likely finished with a French polish procedure. You can see how this is done on Frets.com. Very old school talent. Very few luthiers left that can still do it. Frank Ford is a master of it.

  46. #45

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    Talking about French Polish, do you know what the classical guitar luthiers recommend as a polish for French Polish? Novus #2, a plastic polish for taking out scratches in UW camera domes, aircraft windscreens, etc..

  47. #46

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    The use of shellac and the technique of french polishing is still widely used in the custom classical guitar sector. If done correctly it produces a beautiful deep and rich finish with a luster that is hard to get using more modern finishes. I have a friend who builds custom furniture and he uses it quite a bit but he has spent a lot of time working with it. I also own a couple of guitars with FP finish and they can get marred easily.

    The primary reason nitro and other finish have taken over in the guitar business is that FP is very labor-intensive, requires a fair amount of training and experience and takes a lot of time compared to other finishes. The benefits of shellac i.e. very thin coating coupled with ease of repair get outweighed by the fragility of the finish and the expense i.e. labor and process time.
    Last edited by rob taft; 06-12-2015 at 05:16 PM. Reason: spelling error

  48. #47

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    Thanks, guys. It does look like French Polish.

  49. #48
    Hey Jabby, the Novus 2 works very well on scratches on nitro too but the best stuff I have used is that Guitar Players Scratch remover. It is pricey also but works very well. The pink for light surface scratches and the blue for the deeper scratches. What we do to take care of our babies :-). Nothing more gorgeous that a French polished violin or cello.

  50. #49

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    Quote Originally Posted by vinnyv1k View Post
    Hey Jabby,...Nothing more gorgeous that a French polished violin or cello.
    Not to quibble but they're varnished

  51. #50
    I am talking ones made 2-300 years ago. I have seen a restored 200 year old German violin in French polish and it was the most gorgeous axe I have ever seen.