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  1. #51

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gitfiddler View Post
    I'm confused by your last sentence above. If Jimmy D'Aquisto "took Ibanez to court...", doesn't that imply that some type of legal action (e.g. lawsuit) was filed by D'Aquisto? If so, there would be a record of it somewhere. This is the first I've heard of any such action. Any details?
    All I know is that Jimmy contacted a lawyer, and the result was a very popular jazz guitar model made by Ibanez was not sold by them anymore.
    This was all told to me by Roger Borys, Jimmy's apprentice during this time period, so if you don't think any of this happened, call him up.

    As I've mentioned before, Jimmy HATED Joe Pass with such intensity for screwing him on the Ibanez deal, he didn't speak to him for many years.
    Later on, when Jimmy got the deal with Fender, he forgave Joe for what he did.
    But don't believe me, call Jimmy's family if you're so concerned about finding the truth.

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  3. #52

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    sgcim~ You raised the issue of legal action by Jimmy D'Aquisto; not I. Now you are back-peddling, stating "Jimmy contacted a lawyer....". You seem to have 'inside information' about one of our guitar building heros as well as a jazz guitar icon. That's great, especially for a jazz guitar forum that enjoys discussions about our heros. But expect to be challenged or at least asked respectfully, clarify your own written words, especially if they are unverifiable.

  4. #53

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gitfiddler View Post
    sgcim~ You raised the issue of legal action by Jimmy D'Aquisto; not I. Now you are back-peddling, stating "Jimmy contacted a lawyer....". You seem to have 'inside information' about one of our guitar building heros as well as a jazz guitar icon. That's great, especially for a jazz guitar forum that enjoys discussions about our heros. But expect to be challenged or at least asked respectfully, clarify your own written words, especially if they are unverifiable.
    I dunno, I'm a musician, not a lawyer. I guess I shouldn't say anything about the law unless I can verify it.
    All I know is Jimmy took some kind of action that stopped Ibanez from selling the JP Model, according to Roger.

    If you want to verify it, be my guest.

  5. #54

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    Quote Originally Posted by sgcim View Post
    I dunno, I'm a musician, not a lawyer. I guess I shouldn't say anything about the law unless I can verify it.
    All I know is Jimmy took some kind of action that stopped Ibanez from selling the JP Model, according to Roger.

    If you want to verify it, be my guest.
    You're the one who made the claim, so really it's your job to back it up. You can't just launch a bomb into a discussion and then expect everyone else to clean up after your mess.
    - Lawson
    "Whenever you come near the human race, there's layers and layers of nonsense." - Thornton Wilder, Our Town

  6. #55
    here's bob roetker on his JP-20. I believe he replaced the pickup with a bartolini


  7. #56

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    I dunno. I've played the JP-20 and always thought it sounded fine. To be sure, it's different than the ES-175 (which I played for 30 years as my main guitar). Still, I'd be happy with the JP-20. It's so damned well made--incredibly stable. As Joe D says, it will sustain for days. He's right, too, it gets a Strat/archtop sound.

    Pickup position? No doubt this contributes to the unusual sound. Still, I used to play jazz on a '57 Fender Esquire. All it had was a bridge pickup. I never complained, nor received complaints about this.

  8. #57

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    Joe played a JP20 for over 10 years, and not hundreds but closer to 1000's studio sessions, dates, clubs workshops,

    Joe was not short of money, and simply would have bought or played another guitar if unhappy,

    (as much as i love and respect him) Joes tone was never that great imo, even on Gibsons,


    The Super 58 is a brighter pup Sco's AS200 has Super 58 but Sco's tone is not like a Wes Barney Joe etc it different.

    Heres the Joke Sco use bridge pup a lot.............................

    comparing Ibanez to Gibson is a waste of time they are not Gibson and do not sound like them it is merely a different sound,
    Joe also played thro the house system when he could.

    Imo more a mismatch between pup and guitar as certain pups suit different guitars.


    Its like comparing a LP to Strat or Tele .......................... all different all good.

  9. #58

  10. #59

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    Quote Originally Posted by jzucker View Post
    yeah, joe pass's tone sucked on the 175!

    IMO, Jazz guitar tone does not get any better than that.

    And to avoid any confusion, while that album cover shows a later picture of Joe with an Epiphone of some sort, the Joy Spring album was done with his 1962 ES-175D which had late PAF Pickups and was strung with 13 flats.
    _____________________________________________
    "When the chord changes, you should change" Joe Pass

  11. #60

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    That's probably John Pisano's father's Epiphone, a Deluxe from the 40s if I remember correctly. Joe liked it a lot and used it in the studio on some of his records.
    Beauty is as close to terror as we can well endure. -Rainer Maria Rilke

  12. #61

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cunamara View Post
    That's probably John Pisano's father's Epiphone, a Deluxe from the 40s if I remember correctly. Joe liked it a lot and used it in the studio on some of his records.
    Yep Summer Nights and the one after that (Appasionatto?).

    John Pisano told me that he (John) brought the old Epiphone Deluxe to the studio for the Summer Nights recording, expecting to use it himself and showed it to Joe. Joe played it for a bit and said that he (Joe) would use it for the recording. John had to play a different guitar. Oh well, Joe was the boss
    _____________________________________________
    "When the chord changes, you should change" Joe Pass

  13. #62

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    Quote Originally Posted by lawson-stone View Post
    You're the one who made the claim, so really it's your job to back it up. You can't just launch a bomb into a discussion and then expect everyone else to clean up after your mess.
    We discussed this 'bomb' in depth here previously. Do a search if you're interested.

  14. #63

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    Quote Originally Posted by Stringswinger View Post
    IMO, Jazz guitar tone does not get any better than that.

    And to avoid any confusion, while that album cover shows a later picture of Joe with an Epiphone of some sort, the Joy Spring album was done with his 1962 ES-175D which had late PAF Pickups and was strung with 13 flats.
    SS, when I think of Jazz Guitar, that’s what I hear in my brain.
    You know, I brought the Epiphone thing up once. I was dismissed by a large bad ass guitar playing Polish fellow from Chicago. I still love you though Mr B..
    I didn’t know that guitar was a real Epi from the glory days. Wow.

  15. #64

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    Quote Originally Posted by Max405 View Post
    SS, when I think of Jazz Guitar, that’s what I hear in my brain.
    You know, I brought the Epiphone thing up once. I was dismissed by a large bad ass guitar playing Polish fellow from Chicago. I still love you though Mr B..
    I didn’t know that guitar was a real Epi from the glory days. Wow.
    JD Listen to "Summer Nights", one of Joe's best albums IMO. Joe sounds great on that NON-CUTAWAY Epi Deluxe from the 40's.
    _____________________________________________
    "When the chord changes, you should change" Joe Pass

  16. #65

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    Quote Originally Posted by Max405 View Post
    SS, when I think of Jazz Guitar, that’s what I hear in my brain.
    You know, I brought the Epiphone thing up once. I was dismissed by a large bad ass guitar playing Polish fellow from Chicago. I still love you though Mr B..
    I didn’t know that guitar was a real Epi from the glory days. Wow.
    I also take some issue with the idea that Joe didn't care much about tone. I have pretty much all of his recordings and I listen to them all in the course of a year or so, over and over. Some indeed lack what we today consider great tone, but most of them to my ear sound wonderful. Ira, George and Joe is little known, but has Joe's great ES175 tone. Blues for Fred is one of the most beautiful sounding jazz guitar albums I've ever listened to. Six String Santa is amazingly good.

    Where Joe's tone fails most of our tests is live recordings. That's not Joe's fault. Would we rather not have his playing from those live dates? I think not. He made a decision to give his listeners an album rather than hoard the music because it didn't make him sound great. I admire that.

    The tone on Virtuoso is the result of a recording mishap. Joe decided to give us the album anyhow. The rest is history. Who would NOT want Virtuoso to have been released? "Oh, we have this album of absolutely brain-exploding solo guitar, but you know, we lost the DI feed so no, we're not releasing this album that totally redefines solo guitar..."

    Joe was committed to working, to making music, and getting the music out to listeners.
    Last edited by lawson-stone; 09-14-2018 at 06:16 AM.
    - Lawson
    "Whenever you come near the human race, there's layers and layers of nonsense." - Thornton Wilder, Our Town

  17. #66

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    Meggy,

    That CC looks great, I bet it’s badass in that Ibby.

    Congratulations

    Big

  18. #67

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    Quote Originally Posted by Stringswinger View Post
    JD Listen to "Summer Nights", one of Joe's best albums IMO. Joe sounds great on that NON-CUTAWAY Epi Deluxe from the 40's.
    SS, I will do that. You know, you are right about my short sightedness about the cutaway. The only time I really play up there is when I have to, not when I want to. Id rather stop at the 14th fret.
    I look forward to hearing different sound coming from Joe's Playing.
    My God he was great.
    JD

  19. #68

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    Quote Originally Posted by Max405 View Post
    SS, I will do that. You know, you are right about my short sightedness about the cutaway. The only time I really play up there is when I have to, not when I want to. Id rather stop at the 14th fret.
    I look forward to hearing different sound coming from Joe's Playing.
    My God he was great.
    JD
    Summer Nights and especially Appassionato are among my favorite Joe Pass albums.
    - Lawson
    "Whenever you come near the human race, there's layers and layers of nonsense." - Thornton Wilder, Our Town

  20. #69

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    Lawson,

    Overall, I agree. However, the concert at Jazz Baltica, where JP plays his custom Gibson through the tiny Polytone Baby Taurus, sounds fantastic IMO.


  21. #70

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    Quote Originally Posted by Greentone View Post
    Lawson,

    Overall, I agree. However, the concert at Jazz Baltica, where JP plays his custom Gibson through the tiny Polytone Baby Taurus, sounds fantastic IMO.
    I think we've talked about that performance before; I absolutely agree I think he sounds great in that recording. I just was noting it seems live recordings are the ones where people gripe about Joe's tone. But I almost never hear anything to complain about when I hear one of Joe's tracks.

    One that I think is just gorgeous is his stint with the NDB Big Band Joe Pass in Hamburg. this track is pretty representative of what I hear in a bunch of Joe's recordings. This is a great album, to, though one seldom hears it talked about.

    - Lawson
    "Whenever you come near the human race, there's layers and layers of nonsense." - Thornton Wilder, Our Town

  22. #71

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    Quote Originally Posted by lawson-stone View Post
    Summer Nights and especially Appassionato are among my favorite Joe Pass albums.
    .
    Probably the 2 albums I never heard.
    I have All the Virtuoso's, George Ira Joe, Six String Santa and Intercontinental (my fav). Heck I even have the one he did with Paulinho De Costa, I cant remember the name but it was great too.

    Last night when I was practicing I reinforced the realization that Joe Pass arrangements take up 4 slots in my brains filing system. I know most of the stuff Joe Played was impromptu, but God he was a master.. But its so easy to forget his stuff.

    JD

  23. #72

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    Joe,

    Me, too. I can hear Joe Pass at will in my head. I just can't reproduce it with my clumsy fingers.

    You know, the most abiding thing I draw from all of Pass' playing, believe it or not, isn't his tie-your-fingers-in knots polyphony. Nope. It's his amazing swing. I don't know a guitarist who swings more sensationally--even when he's just changing from II-V. I feel Joe Pass' rhythm more than even Wes Montgomery's--that's saying a lot!

    GT

  24. #73

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    I have all of Joe Pass' recorded output. Next to Wes, he is my favorite guitarist. My five favorite Joe Pass albums are:

    Intercontinental
    For Django
    Virtuoso
    Summer Nights
    Two for the road (with Herb Ellis)

    Pass could swing like nobody's business. He was not as discerning about tone as some to be sure, though I would bet that the recordings with less than stellar tone are more the fault of soundmen/recording engineers.

    I do like his tone best on his 175's, but he sounded great on many recordings with his D'Aquistos (he owned two), Pisano's vintage Epiphone, his Ibanez and even the classical he used on the Songs for Ellen album. Tone is in the fingers, and God has made few fingers as talented as those of Joe Pass.
    _____________________________________________
    "When the chord changes, you should change" Joe Pass

  25. #74

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    Quote Originally Posted by Greentone View Post
    Joe,

    Me, too. I can hear Joe Pass at will in my head. I just can't reproduce it with my clumsy fingers.

    You know, the most abiding thing I draw from all of Pass' playing, believe it or not, isn't his tie-your-fingers-in knots polyphony. Nope. It's his amazing swing. I don't know a guitarist who swings more sensationally--even when he's just changing from II-V. I feel Joe Pass' rhythm more than even Wes Montgomery's--that's saying a lot!

    GT
    GT, Yeah, me too. I try but it always comes out sounding like some cheap-ass Joe Pass imitation.
    I read one time that his father had a lot to do with his methodology. His dad told him to fill the spaces. Hearing that over and over Joe probably realized at a young age that he had to be a one man band of sorts and that's the foundation of his greatness.
    Like Vinny would say, he was "in the pocket". And he was, even when there was no pocket to be in..
    Shear brilliance.


    Quote Originally Posted by Stringswinger View Post
    I have all of Joe Pass' recorded output. Next to Wes, he is my favorite guitarist. My five favorite Joe Pass albums are:

    Intercontinental
    For Django
    Virtuoso
    Summer Nights
    Two for the road (with Herb Ellis)

    Pass could swing like nobody's business. He was not as discerning about tone as some to be sure, though I would bet that the recordings with less than stellar tone are more the fault of soundmen/recording engineers.

    I do like his tone best on his 175's, but he sounded great on many recordings with his D'Aquistos (he owned two), Pisano's vintage Epiphone, his Ibanez and even the classical he used on the Songs for Ellen album. Tone is in the fingers, and God has made few fingers as talented as those of Joe Pass.
    Well put SS, as always.
    Its been a privilege to learn from him. He was a genius.
    JD

  26. #75

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    Another thing about Joe was that he was a very approachable, friendly guy. I’ll never forget how he bought me a beer and we had a nice chat in the bar at Ronnie Scott’s once.

  27. #76

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    I'm a big Joe Pass fan as well. The links below are to a great fan webpage run by a guy who met Joe in Japan and spent a fair amount of time with him. The first link is to his board page titled "Salon". Great remembrances from former students and friends. The other is the main link.

    Salon

    Joe Pass Memorial Hall

  28. #77

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    Check out Chops with NHOP. Sweet guitar/bass dueling.

  29. #78

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    Quote Originally Posted by BigMikeinNJ View Post


    Meggy,

    That CC looks great, I bet it’s badass in that Ibby.

    Congratulations

    Big
    Thanks Big - it's badass indeed, and looks great also imho. Not to say that the guitar wasn't already great, but it has made what is an improvement just for my own tastes.

  30. #79

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    For me, this is basically in the ' you have got to be kidding ' category.......As much a showcase of NHOP as JP.......I mean who stays with JP on 'Oleo' note for note on an upright bass ?? Answer: NHOP, and few, if any others..........

  31. #80

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    FWIW, for the folks who think that JP was never short of money, the economics of jazz is such that there was Miles--who was a millionaire due to the sales of some of his Columbia catalog--and there was pretty much everyone else.

    Lots of household names were scuffling, truth be told. They owned/own homes and get mailbox money and such, but it isn't easy street. It isn't country music money or pop money.

    Just sayin'.

  32. #81

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    Yes, that observation of JP supposedly never ' being short of money' reminded me of that short Bill Evans bio on PBS........

    ......the person describing BE said he remembered a couple times seeing or hearing that BE's furniture had been stacked out on the street, and he'd been evicted.......

    ........at one time or another, for differing durations, both BE and JP had the same habit, and it wasn't a good one and it sure as s**t wasn't cheap, no matter how much they may or may not have been making.........

  33. #82

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dennis D View Post



    For me, this is basically in the ' you have got to be kidding ' category.......As much a showcase of NHOP as JP.......I mean who stays with JP on 'Oleo' note for note on an upright bass ?? Answer: NHOP, and few, if any others..........
    From that same performance, this track was my "You've got to be kidding" track. The interplay between the two of them was amazing.
    - Lawson
    "Whenever you come near the human race, there's layers and layers of nonsense." - Thornton Wilder, Our Town

  34. #83

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    From 1986 to 1990 I was a staff mixer at GroupIV Recording studios on Wilcox in Hollywood. Joe did a lot of recording in that room, Studio A. The owner was Angel Ballister, and he and Joe were pals. Studio A was state of the art at the time-Trident desk and Studer 24 track 2" machine. All mastering machines were also Studer. The mic locker was totally mind blowing with Neumann, Telefunken and RCA ribbon mics-just about anything a sound engineer could want. So as far as the speculation that Joe's tone may have been caused by inferior equipment-well I would have to respectfully disagree. Studio A was a very large room, large enough to hold about sixty players as the bread and butter sessions were with Mike Post, scoring "LA Law", and other popular shows at that time. Alan Silvestri scored "The Abyss" in that room, and about half of the LA Phil was on that session.

    We had a Post-Production room, and I was working on the Tracey Ullman show for Fox when Joe and Ella were working on a duet recording. I was a huge fan of Joe's then (and now) and wandered over to Studio A during a break to see what was up. They were on a break as well, and Angel and Joe were smoking cigars in the studio. I started a conversation with Joe and told him how much I admired his playing and he asked if I played. I replied yes and he said let me hear a song. His 175 was hooked up to a Polytone and he and Angel pointed at the rig. I don't remember much about the 175 to tell the truth. I made a stab at Autumn Leaves and he graciously said"...sounds good, keep after it" and went back to his cigar with Angel. Never forget that moment, and 25 years later I'm still "after it".

    Yes, Joe was one in a trillion.
    posted this a while back. Thought it might be of interest in this discussion. Cheers!

  35. #84

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    Quote Originally Posted by Greentone View Post
    FWIW, for the folks who think that JP was never short of money, the economics of jazz is such that there was Miles--who was a millionaire due to the sales of some of his Columbia catalog--and there was pretty much everyone else.

    Lots of household names were scuffling, truth be told. They owned/own homes and get mailbox money and such, but it isn't easy street. It isn't country music money or pop money.

    Just sayin'.
    No money in jazz you say? I dunno, I seem to be on my way to making tens of dollars in this business.
    _____________________________________________
    "When the chord changes, you should change" Joe Pass

  36. #85

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    Quote Originally Posted by SierraTango View Post
    From 1986 to 1990 I was a staff mixer at GroupIV Recording studios on Wilcox in Hollywood. Joe did a lot of recording in that room, Studio A. The owner was Angel Ballister, and he and Joe were pals. Studio A was state of the art at the time-Trident desk and Studer 24 track 2" machine. All mastering machines were also Studer. The mic locker was totally mind blowing with Neumann, Telefunken and RCA ribbon mics-just about anything a sound engineer could want. So as far as the speculation that Joe's tone may have been caused by inferior equipment-well I would have to respectfully disagree. Studio A was a very large room, large enough to hold about sixty players as the bread and butter sessions were with Mike Post, scoring "LA Law", and other popular shows at that time. Alan Silvestri scored "The Abyss" in that room, and about half of the LA Phil was on that session.

    We had a Post-Production room, and I was working on the Tracey Ullman show for Fox when Joe and Ella were working on a duet recording. I was a huge fan of Joe's then (and now) and wandered over to Studio A during a break to see what was up. They were on a break as well, and Angel and Joe were smoking cigars in the studio. I started a conversation with Joe and told him how much I admired his playing and he asked if I played. I replied yes and he said let me hear a song. His 175 was hooked up to a Polytone and he and Angel pointed at the rig. I don't remember much about the 175 to tell the truth. I made a stab at Autumn Leaves and he graciously said"...sounds good, keep after it" and went back to his cigar with Angel. Never forget that moment, and 25 years later I'm still "after it".

    Yes, Joe was one in a trillion.
    posted this a while back. Thought it might be of interest in this discussion. Cheers!
    great!!

    cheers

  37. #86

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    Sierra Tango~ Thank you for your great insights...from being there with the master.

    Is this one of the session albums you refer to?



  38. #87

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    Quote Originally Posted by SierraTango View Post
    From 1986 to 1990 I was a staff mixer at GroupIV Recording studios on Wilcox in Hollywood. Joe did a lot of recording in that room, Studio A. The owner was Angel Ballister, and he and Joe were pals. Studio A was state of the art at the time-Trident desk and Studer 24 track 2" machine. All mastering machines were also Studer. The mic locker was totally mind blowing with Neumann, Telefunken and RCA ribbon mics-just about anything a sound engineer could want. So as far as the speculation that Joe's tone may have been caused by inferior equipment-well I would have to respectfully disagree. Studio A was a very large room, large enough to hold about sixty players as the bread and butter sessions were with Mike Post, scoring "LA Law", and other popular shows at that time. Alan Silvestri scored "The Abyss" in that room, and about half of the LA Phil was on that session.

    We had a Post-Production room, and I was working on the Tracey Ullman show for Fox when Joe and Ella were working on a duet recording. I was a huge fan of Joe's then (and now) and wandered over to Studio A during a break to see what was up. They were on a break as well, and Angel and Joe were smoking cigars in the studio. I started a conversation with Joe and told him how much I admired his playing and he asked if I played. I replied yes and he said let me hear a song. His 175 was hooked up to a Polytone and he and Angel pointed at the rig. I don't remember much about the 175 to tell the truth. I made a stab at Autumn Leaves and he graciously said"...sounds good, keep after it" and went back to his cigar with Angel. Never forget that moment, and 25 years later I'm still "after it".

    Yes, Joe was one in a trillion.
    posted this a while back. Thought it might be of interest in this discussion. Cheers!
    One of the coolest stories I've ever heard on the forum!

  39. #88

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    Yes, I totally agree. Some of the experience on this forum is mind blowing.
    Sierra Tango, thanks for sharing that. It was awesome.
    Joe D.

  40. #89

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    The man himself...worst video quality in the world


  41. #90

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    What I heard regarding recording problems for Joe was only about the original Virtuoso album. What I've read is that there was the electric signal and a mic on the guitar for some acoustic tone, and that for most of the tracks the electric signal was somehow lost, but the acoustic was actually good and the playing was incredible, so they ran with it.

    I'd love to know if that story is wrong.
    - Lawson
    "Whenever you come near the human race, there's layers and layers of nonsense." - Thornton Wilder, Our Town

  42. #91

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    Quote Originally Posted by dot75 View Post
    The man himself...worst video quality in the world

    So according to that Video, Joe Pass said, he designed the neck on it. He wanted it flat.
    He also said, "I told them to put the pickup here". And he wanted no "iron" on it.
    Well that tells me all I needed to know.
    Thanks for posting this video. I dont know the whole story, but at least I know some of it now.
    I don't have a single problem with Joe using the design of this guitar. He changed it enough to make it his own signature. And, because Ibanez made it, it was readily available, extremely well built AND the cost of it was within reach of the working musician. I have no issue with it at all. I'm sorry if this pisses off the Jimmy D'Aquisto faithful. The D'Aquisto/Fender partnership happened too late, in my opinion. It should have happened in the early 80's. Things would have been different.
    I really wish I could have gotten along with that neck. If I didnt have my love affair with Gibsons and their neck profiles, I'd still have a JP20 (and I'd still have the Heritage D'A New Yorker II, which had a similar neck). But I have a problem conforming to different neck profiles. Its not the guitar, its me. Now I appreciate it even more knowing that Joe did tell Ibanez where he wanted things.

    Joe D

  43. #92

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    Quote Originally Posted by lawson-stone View Post
    What I heard regarding recording problems for Joe was only about the original Virtuoso album. What I've read is that there was the electric signal and a mic on the guitar for some acoustic tone, and that for most of the tracks the electric signal was somehow lost, but the acoustic was actually good and the playing was incredible, so they ran with it.

    I'd love to know if that story is wrong.
    Dennis Sands was the engineer on Virtuoso. I worked with Dennis at Group IV during my employment at that studio. Specifically, the Tracy Ullman show I mentioned in my earlier post. He was the dialogue mixer and I was the music and sound effects mixer. I want to be concise here-this was post-production of the show. Back in those days we had several elements of material to deal with. The dialogue was cut on 35mm stripe, the music cues came in on 1/2" 4 track tape, and we built sound effects on a 24 track Otari 2" machine. All this was slaved to a 3/4" videotape with SMPTE time code, which was fed to a Q-Lock reader for sync.
    I did ask Dennis about the Virtuoso session during our time together and he didn't seem to have any report of tech difficulties, however it is unlikely he would have mentioned anything as no one was complaining about Joe's sound on the record. He only spoke of what a mind blowing player Joe was and had nothing but respect for the man.
    Dennis was/is a super talented mixer who went on to much success in the film business. Like myself and many mixers at the time, we started in records (In my case, the Sound Factory on Selma and Ivar-my first session as a 2nd there was on Jackson Browne's "Hold Out" with Greg Ladanyi-RIP). However records were a real grind and the goal was to get into film mixing-another grind but a better environment and more prestige in some ways.
    I was fortunate to share a cup of coffee with Ella and chat a bit at Group IV during a break. My life is complete.

    P.S. For you trivia fans, the Tracy Ullman Show spun off the Simpsons, one of the most successful shows in the history of TV. Yes, I worked on the early episodes with Matt the creator. Another story..

  44. #93

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    When you do this as a living it's a profession. Which means you have to pay the bills, including recording studio costs, managers, agents, and oh yeah ... the kid's college costs.

    He endorses the guitar, so they pay him something however small to do so, including providing instruments probably. It's something to help on those bills.

    It's a job.

    Sent from my SM-G930V using Tapatalk

  45. #94

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    That's interesting Joe , i dont own one but
    The one I tried out (and didn't buy unfortunately)
    had the nicest most comfortable neck
    I've ever played ....
    Smooth man

    I guess all of our hands are very different
    anyway Vive is differance ....

    Carry on

  46. #95

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    Quote Originally Posted by lawson-stone View Post
    What I heard regarding recording problems for Joe was only about the original Virtuoso album. What I've read is that there was the electric signal and a mic on the guitar for some acoustic tone, and that for most of the tracks the electric signal was somehow lost, but the acoustic was actually good and the playing was incredible, so they ran with it.

    I'd love to know if that story is wrong.
    I have heard the same story. When that album came out, I assumed that the acoustic sounding tracks were done on the D'Aquisto and the few electric sounding tracks were done on the 175. I too would like to know the truth about that album.
    _____________________________________________
    "When the chord changes, you should change" Joe Pass

  47. #96

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    Interesting that Virtuoso 4 is all acoustic too, and was recorded shortly after Virtuoso, in the same studio (if Wikipedia is correct). So maybe it was decided (for whatever reason) to record that way on both sessions.

  48. #97

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    Quote Originally Posted by Stringswinger View Post
    I have heard the same story. When that album came out, I assumed that the acoustic sounding tracks were done on the D'Aquisto and the few electric sounding tracks were done on the 175. I too would like to know the truth about that album.
    When this question came up once before, as an experiment I tried recording my 175 (acoustic sound only) in a sort of ‘poor man’s Joe Pass’ attempt, just to see what it sounded like. It certainly seemed to get a similar sound to the Virtuoso record:


  49. #98

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    Quote Originally Posted by grahambop View Post
    when this question came up once before, as an experiment i tried recording my 175 (acoustic sound only) in a sort of ‘poor man’s joe pass’ attempt, just to see what it sounded like. It certainly seemed to get a similar sound to the virtuoso record:

    q. E. D.
    - Lawson
    "Whenever you come near the human race, there's layers and layers of nonsense." - Thornton Wilder, Our Town

  50. #99

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    By the way, searching for Virtuoso 4 tracks just now I found this! I’ve never heard it before.


  51. #100
    not exactly a ringing endorsement...

    Quote Originally Posted by dot75 View Post
    The man himself...worst video quality in the world