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  1. #1

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    I have a 1993 carved Heritage Eagle guitar with floating PUP, a truly wonderful, beautiful instrument. The only drawback is I'm trying to dial in a nice, clean tone for it. My Polytone-Mini-Bruit seems to work great for my other guitars, but I've not as satisfied with the Polytone sound with the Heritage Eagle. Possibly because I have to keep the volume real down; otherwise, sounds too bass-y.

    What amps have people used with this guitar? settings?

    BTW: I swapped out the Heritage floating pickup for a Kent Armstrong.

    I'm going to GC on Sunday to try out a Fender Hot Rod Deluxe. What do people thing about this amp??

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    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #2

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    I think the Fender will be too bassy as well.

    Have you tried it through a Roland Cube?
    Might be worth a listen.

    I had a Heritage Eagle and being as they're very responsive acoustically had trouble with feedback.

    I'm thinking something with multiple small 8" speakers like a Roland I saw that was sorta like a MicroCube, but had 4 tiny speakers.

    It may be necessary to use some kind of EQ device to notch out the bassy frequencies and/or feedback prone freqs.

    I remember playing mine at a Holiday Inn job and had to be very aware of amp proximity and angle relationship to get through. Volume is an enemy in some rooms.

  4. #3

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    I think the Roland Cubes are really good for Jazz.
    I have the 60 myself and have heard the other types, including the Microcube and they all sounded great.

  5. #4

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    Hi, are you getting a sound you like now? I acquired an Eagle about two years ago and -- coming from an ES175 -- it took me a while to get the sound that I wanted. I was playing through a Polytone and it just sounded thin and weak. Like you, I replaced the pickup (in my case with a Benedetto) and I also added a tone control. My Eagle has a spruce top which is brighter than the mahogany tops which are typical, but even with mahogany it's very helpful to be able to roll off some of the top end. After trying it with a variety of amps, I bought an Evans JE200 which is a bit pricey and took a while to dial in, but now sounds incredible. This axe also sounded nice (albeit a bit more traditional) through a Fender Twin. The Eagle is now my main working guitar and I can't tell you how many cats have told me it's a great-sounding axe (of course the amp is a big part of it). Hope this helps. Cheers. =PL

  6. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by philiplewis View Post
    Hi, are you getting a sound you like now? I acquired an Eagle about two years ago and -- coming from an ES175 -- it took me a while to get the sound that I wanted. I was playing through a Polytone and it just sounded thin and weak. Like you, I replaced the pickup (in my case with a Benedetto) and I also added a tone control. My Eagle has a spruce top which is brighter than the mahogany tops which are typical, but even with mahogany it's very helpful to be able to roll off some of the top end. After trying it with a variety of amps, I bought an Evans JE200 which is a bit pricey and took a while to dial in, but now sounds incredible. This axe also sounded nice (albeit a bit more traditional) through a Fender Twin. The Eagle is now my main working guitar and I can't tell you how many cats have told me it's a great-sounding axe (of course the amp is a big part of it). Hope this helps. Cheers. =PL
    +1 on the Evans

    I'm on my 3rd Evans, I had 2 JE200s, they all sounded great, but the first was very feedback prone. My second was much better, with a much smaller cabinet. Sounds great, although at ~40lbs, I was looking for something a little smaller & lighter. About a year ago I bought an Evans RE200, 10" speaker (the JE has a 12). It's only about 25 lbs, nice small, tight package, & sounds great and is even less feedback probe than my JE200.

    BTW, I still have my JE200 and plan on putting it on eBay, but just haven't gotten around to it. If you are interested, PM me & I can send some pictures.

    Ron

  7. #6

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    Thanks for the info. Never heard of the Evans, but I'll definitely look it up. I'm gonna check out the Fender Twin--actually, I already did, but with a different guitar (to no effect, too loud, too many metal heads roaming around). Later on this week, I'll bring my Heritage Eagle. It's a thinline,actually.

  8. #7

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    i don't know about the eagle, i've never played a hollow-body but i'm gonna go ahead and suggest a non-conventional amp... a Hartke.

    i have a small one that sounds very good clean, i also tried a big one (100W i believe it was, 2x12s) and it also had a great clean tone. if you try it, let me know what you think of it, i wanna know other people's opinion on these amps.

    my humble opinion is that they sound good without being too flashy or ultra-expensive.

  9. #8

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    I had an 89 Golden eagle and a 91 Johnny Smith Rose from Heritage and I was very unhappy with both of them. I was playing them through an old Ampeg Reverberocket which usually gives a very full, rich sound. Both guitars were thin and weak and I wound up keeping them only for a very short time. They were beautiful guitars but I couldn't get past that cold sound. Either I had too much treble or too much bass. I couldn't seem to get it in the middle somewhere. I couldn't believe they were made by the old Gibson guys.

  10. #9

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    I use an Evans RE200 and a Roland jazz chorus, both are nice.
    jam on,
    Terry

  11. #10

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    Yeah, I've found it really takes some time to get a satisfactory sound with the Eagle -- the floating pickup has a very different response curve from top-mounted humbuckers, especially in the attack. Also it takes time to dial in the amp with something super-clean like the Evans (or Polytone, or Acoustic Image, etc.). This type of amp is basically colorless so it takes a while to adjust the amp EQ to match the guitar's tone. Whereas with a Twin you can pretty much just plug in and go. The thing I really like about the Evans is that it gives me a lot more dynamic range. I can play very softly and it still has great definition, nice and crisp, and of course it has tons of headroom.

    Re: feedback, it's worth noting that any carved-top instrument is going to feed back a whole lot more than plywood tops (like the ES175) -- in fact, that was point of using the laminate top on the ES175. I've been able to control feedback with the Eagle by using these custom foam f-hole inserts that I ordered from this fellow: Doug's Plugs - hand-made f-hole covers to eliminate feedback in your archtop guitar. They work great but are not cheap.

    Sorry to hear about the fellow who had two bad Heritages. I've owned 2 myself and they were both excellent (if somewhat unusual) instruments, but I have heard other similar stories. They seem to have QA issues. =PL

  12. #11

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    This might surprise you but I would suggest that you take a look at Traynor amps. I have two of them, both tube amps : the YCV 50 and the newest YCS 50 (wich you can use in 15W or 50W mode).
    I used these amps for blues and blues-rock but since I'm more and more into jazz, I discovered that they also can give a rich and velvety sound with my Morris archtop or my Godin Flat FiveX. They are extremely quiet, have a superb clean channel with lots of head room. I know, it's a matter of taste but I suggest that you give them a try.