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  1. #1

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    I played a Heritage at the local guitar shop the other day. The action was really easy compared to other archtops. It looked to me like it was strung with 11's. I also noticed it only had 20 frets. I'm wondering if the lighter strings and shorter scale length had something to do with it. Does anybody know what the usual factory string set is?

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  3. #2

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    I imagine it depends on what model you are talking about. Their solid body models probably come with lighter strings than their hollowbodies. Since Heritage guitars are made in the original Gibson factory by guys who worked for decades for Gibson, and use the Gibson base models as a platform, they have the shorter 24 3/4" Gibson scale. Compared to PRS 25", or Fender scale 25 1/2", the shorter scale makes for less string tension.

    Of course string thickness figures in also. It really depends on what you get used to. I play .12's on my Gibson ES 175, and .11's on my strat and tele.

  4. #3
    I'm not sure what model it was, but it was a hollow body. This particular shop no longer carries the brand and they said they would give me a real deal. I might have to reconsider, because it had some killer tone.

  5. #4

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    I owned three Heritage guitars, an H575, a Golden eagle and a Johnny Smith back in 1992 or something like that. They all came with 11's which seems to be their usual setup. Unfortunately, I had to sell those guitars. They were all the standard models, not the customs and sounded really cold and dry. I never could get the sound out of them that I wanted. I hope that those guys have corrected the problem. Ah well, I digress.

  6. #5

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    I played a 575 this summer that was fantastic. Solid wood version of an ES175.

  7. #6

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    I special ordered the 17" with the single pickgaurd mounted pup. The neck was the worst neck I ever played. Something was off because you had to set one side of the adjustable bridge all the way down and the opposite side all the way up to get it to play right. First and last Heritage I ever owned.

    I don't thibk they have the same re-sale value either.

  8. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by JohnW400 View Post
    I special ordered the 17" with the single pickgaurd mounted pup. The neck was the worst neck I ever played. Something was off because you had to set one side of the adjustable bridge all the way down and the opposite side all the way up to get it to play right. First and last Heritage I ever owned.

    I don't thibk they have the same re-sale value either.
    That's a real shame, but not surprising. A little web searching finds another story of a once great company in decline.

  9. #8

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    I think the quality is a bit hit and miss. I've heard players say they were as good as Gibsons and many say they were terrible. That's what happened with my Golden Eagle and my Johnny Smith. They looked fantastic but I couldn't get a warm sound out of them even if I had set the things on fire. I was even using an Ampeg Reverberocket from the late 60's and that didn't help. The 575 was the best of the lot but still didn't give me what I needed. Besides, it was finished in very blonde wood which made it look like it was made out of Oscar Meyer processed turkey. Really light. What the heck was I thinking?!?
    Last edited by hot ford coupe; 10-12-2008 at 09:03 PM.

  10. #9

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    Ingenieri,

    I see your a Heritage fan. I owned one and , well my post about it is above. I will go on to say that I'm not a big Gibson fan either these days. I have a July 2000 Super 400 that had some issues. I also have a custom shop ES-350 where they didn't clean off the orange compound from the inside binding on the F hole. To me that's a big sin on a guitar that has a custom shop decal on the back of the peg head. Back in 1990 I special ordered a Byrdland and that had a neck issue (though not as bad as the Heritage Golden Eagle)

    My recommendation these days to anyone that want's to plunk down 3500 or more on an archtop is to check out people like M Campellone, H Verri and even Sadowsky although his are laminates. If you have even more to spend , like the $7000 you mention, You could look at Buscarino or Comins or even Gary Mortoro.

    I've owned about 12 different Gibsons at one time or another. I have 2 custom archtops.

    After going through all these guitars I can only say that I would probably buy another custom luthiers model before I buy another GIbson and definately before I even consider a heritage.