The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
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  1. #151

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    Quote Originally Posted by docsteve
    I got myself a Quilter Microblock 45 a month ago. I admit that one month is not really enough time for a solid assessment, but I'm absolutely in love with it.

    I play a Telecaster into a 1x12 Fender box and it's got the sound I want...
    Hi, I hope my etiquette is ok here for replying to an old thread. I haven't been here in a while, and I don't remember if I did introductions. So my name is Steve. Hi!

    I've been thinking about Quilters and pedal amps in general. Just wondering if your Microblock held up not only in function, but expectations-- since you were still in the honeymoon phase on this post I quoted.

    I see the Microblock 45 was discontinued, so I've wondered things like how practical it is?, does it get hot? etc. I see there are still a few around (both NOS and used of course). I would probably try the current UK superblock and use the non-TB Vox for an attempt at jazz tones. I am curious about that because of the 70s Marshall mode as I've never owned a 70s JMP. I still like the Marshall sound for rock.

    But back to jazz, I saw a demo of the US version in the Aviator Cub by Rich Severson and that sounded good clean on all the settings (tweed, brown, black) Fender. Anyone here try an Avaitor cub for jazz?

    Thanks,
    Steve

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  3. #152

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    Quote Originally Posted by strat68
    Hi, I hope my etiquette is ok here for replying to an old thread. I haven't been here in a while, and I don't remember if I did introductions. So my name is Steve. Hi!

    I've been thinking about Quilters and pedal amps in general. Just wondering if your Microblock held up not only in function, but expectations-- since you were still in the honeymoon phase on this post I quoted.

    I see the Microblock 45 was discontinued, so I've wondered things like how practical it is?, does it get hot? etc. I see there are still a few around (both NOS and used of course). I would probably try the current UK superblock and use the non-TB Vox for an attempt at jazz tones. I am curious about that because of the 70s Marshall mode as I've never owned a 70s JMP. I still like the Marshall sound for rock.

    But back to jazz, I saw a demo of the US version in the Aviator Cub by Rich Severson and that sounded good clean on all the settings (tweed, brown, black) Fender. Anyone here try an Avaitor cub for jazz?

    Thanks,
    Steve

    I like quilter amps. I wrote this while still in a honeymoon phase with the amp. Quilter Aviator (with Tone Tubby Alnico Speaker)

    I eventually sold that amp, only because I found that plugging it into a cabinet with a 1x10 that I preferred a smaller speaker for jazz. Additionally I think the cabinet design is a limiting factor for that amp. The actual amplifier was great.

    My perspective on quilter amps is that they are great for jazz but they tend to be bright. To really shine, they should be paired with the right speaker.

    I now have a quilter superblock (which is the head version of the same amp) and plug it into an open back raezers edge cabinet loaded with a 10" celestion gold. This rig is amazing and definitely loud enough for playing jazz at small clubs.

    Quilter Amps-img_5847-jpg

  4. #153

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    I have both a Micro and a Super US - and I love them both. I bought the Micro used as a backup, but it’s a great little amp. Just for giggles, I used it on a jazz date through a RevSound 8 and on a blues gig through a Toob 10”. It was great on both.

    The SBUS is stellar through my Toobs (Metro and 10), my RevSound 8RS, and my RE 10. I get a great jazz tone from archtops with gain down, volume up, and limiter off. And I get a great blues tone from solid bodies with gain up, volume down, and limiter at about noon. I usually leave EQ flat.

    I don’t think there’s a better value available than the SBs for anyone who needs flexibility in a moderately powered head. And the Microblock is one amazing little box if you don’t need the I&O, knobs and switches.

  5. #154

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    FWIW, I've been using a Mach 2 8" and a Mach 2 12" HD for several years, and they've been great. Super versatile, powerful, compact and light wight. I've never tried one of the pedal amps or compact heads, so I don't know how they compare.
    Last edited by Woody Sound; 11-30-2022 at 01:00 PM.

  6. #155

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    This is a fairly common complaint. If they would fix this, it would be my favorite amp ever. Apparently, there is a fairly simple mod that involves plugging a 1/4 jack with the right value capacitor into the effect return jack
    Quote Originally Posted by omphalopsychos
    I like quilter amps. I wrote this while still in a honeymoon phase with the amp. Quilter Aviator (with Tone Tubby Alnico Speaker)

    I eventually sold that amp, only because I found that plugging it into a cabinet with a 1x10 that I preferred a smaller speaker for jazz. Additionally I think the cabinet design is a limiting factor for that amp. The actual amplifier was great.

    My perspective on quilter amps is that they are great for jazz but they tend to be bright. To really shine, they should be paired with the right speaker.

    I now have a quilter superblock (which is the head version of the same amp) and plug it into an open back raezers edge cabinet loaded with a 10" celestion gold. This rig is amazing and definitely loud enough for playing jazz at small clubs.

    Quilter Amps-img_5847-jpg

  7. #156

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    Quote Originally Posted by jzucker
    This is a fairly common complaint. If they would fix this, it would be my favorite amp ever. Apparently, there is a fairly simple mod that involves plugging a 1/4 jack with the right value capacitor into the effect return jack
    Can you please provide more details on this hack? I have a micropro, I might try to see if I like the results.

  8. #157

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    Jack, what you're describing is a low pass filter and a pretty good idea. Here's an example in pedal form: Low Pass Filter | Broughton Audio. Or you can make your own for way less money (it's basically a tone pot in a metal box).

    I actually was thinking not just that you want a speaker to roll off high end, but also a speaker to add low mids and body to the quilter. This cannot be achieved with a low pass filter alone.

  9. #158

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    Quote Originally Posted by omphalopsychos
    Jack, what you're describing is a low pass filter and a pretty good idea. Here's an example in pedal form: Low Pass Filter | Broughton Audio. Or you can make your own for way less money (it's basically a tone pot in a metal box).

    I actually was thinking not just that you want a speaker to roll off high end, but also a speaker to add low mids and body to the quilter. This cannot be achieved with a low pass filter alone.
    The reason the quilter sounds bright (to some) is that they use a bypass technique to shunt high frequencies at lower vol settings in much the same manner as a bright switch on a fender amp. The low pass filter on the effect return basically undoes that effect. And the pedal doesn't do the same thing because it needs to happen in the amp. It might help and when I had my quilter, I used to keep all my guitars' tone controls down at 2 or 3 which is basically what the pedal would be doing. Better to do it in the amp IMO...

  10. #159

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tal_175
    Can you please provide more details on this hack? I have a micropro, I might try to see if I like the results.
    i don't have the details handy. Joey Goldstein posted about this on the modernjazzguitar facebook group but I don't see it now. He had talked to pat quilter directly and told him about the brightness issue on his toneblock 202 and pat told him about that. You could probably contact quilter tech support and mention that. I would have written the info down but don't have a quilter atm...

  11. #160

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    Quote Originally Posted by jzucker
    The reason the quilter sounds bright (to some) is that they use a bypass technique to shunt high frequencies at loser vol settings in much the same manner as a bright switch on a fender amp. The low pass filter on the effect return basically undoes that effect. And the pedal doesn't do the same thing because it needs to happen in the amp. It might help and when I had my quilter, I used to keep all my guitars' tone controls down at 2 or 3 which is basically what the pedal would be doing. Better to do it in the amp IMO...
    I guess you can put the low pass pedal in the effects loop but a passive solution is preferable if a powered pedal isn't necessary.

  12. #161

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    Quote Originally Posted by jzucker
    The reason the quilter sounds bright (to some) is that they use a bypass technique to shunt high frequencies at lower vol settings in much the same manner as a bright switch on a fender amp. The low pass filter on the effect return basically undoes that effect. And the pedal doesn't do the same thing because it needs to happen in the amp. It might help and when I had my quilter, I used to keep all my guitars' tone controls down at 2 or 3 which is basically what the pedal would be doing. Better to do it in the amp IMO...
    Jack, I agree, it needs to happen "in the amp". My suggestion for that pedal would be to put it in the effects loop, not before the amp. This means it would be in the same place in the circuit as the capacitor trick you are describing.


    Quote Originally Posted by Tal_175
    I guess you can put the low pass pedal in the effects loop but a passive solution is preferable if a powered pedal isn't necessary.
    Exactly. I don't know much about that pedal other than finding it in 0.3 seconds by googling "low pass filter guitar pedal". I don't know why the circuit is active, but it shouldn't be hard to find or build a totally passive low pass filter that doesn't require power.

  13. #162

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    To build an RC low pass filter you need a resistor and capacitor wired to an instrument cable to connect to the send and return of the quilter. If your amp has a TRS fx loop, it's actually easier, you can simply solder the resistor and capacitor to a TRS pancake jack. Here's an example (just capacitor on this one - a high pass filter).


    Quilter Amps-screenshot-2022-11-30-9-17-50-am-png


    More details on how this works here:



    Or if you prefer it explained by someone who's obviously taken 5x the lethal dose of mdma and survived, here:

  14. #163

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    I recently purchased two Quilters. A US block and a mini head 101 and matching 10” cab.

    Whilst I found them to be usable and good value for money, I returned the U.S block and sold the mini head + cab.
    I find quilter to be a little sterile. I thought the US block would be it but was left feeling underwhelmed. I will keep trying.
    I must say, the ‘Milkman’ amp looks very appealing.

  15. #164

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    [QUOTE=jzucker;1234002]This is a fairly common complaint. If they would fix this, it would be my favorite amp ever./QUOTE]

    "Fix this" is probably not the right term JAZ, as if something is wrong or broken with them. You are implying that your own particular taste is the end all for everyone else. I am perfectly happy with the tone on my Quilter combos just as they are, for everything I do. Jazz combos, modern jazz big band, theater pit, TOP style funk big band.

  16. #165

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    Quote Originally Posted by strat68
    Hi, I hope my etiquette is ok here for replying to an old thread. I haven't been here in a while, and I don't remember if I did introductions. So my name is Steve. Hi!

    I've been thinking about Quilters and pedal amps in general. Just wondering if your Microblock held up not only in function, but expectations-- since you were still in the honeymoon phase on this post I quoted.

    I see the Microblock 45 was discontinued, so I've wondered things like how practical it is?, does it get hot? etc. I see there are still a few around (both NOS and used of course). I would probably try the current UK superblock and use the non-TB Vox for an attempt at jazz tones. I am curious about that because of the 70s Marshall mode as I've never owned a 70s JMP. I still like the Marshall sound for rock.

    But back to jazz, I saw a demo of the US version in the Aviator Cub by Rich Severson and that sounded good clean on all the settings (tweed, brown, black) Fender. Anyone here try an Avaitor cub for jazz?

    Thanks,
    Steve
    Since you addressed me directly:

    I still have the MicroBlock, but have upgraded to the Superblock US recently. The better is the enemy of the good, or so they say...

    The Microblock doesn't get hot, sounds good by itself, but comes into its own as a base for pedals. The SB is just so much more versatile. I only need to carry it and a cabinet, no pedals, which suits my minimalist approach. The D.I. out sounds great, too.

    There are several threads on the Superblock, and as you can see from the responses, Quilter amps get a lot of love on this forum in general. I should think that the SB US is better suited to jazz tones than the SB UK, but then I have only tried the former, and there is a Youtube demo of the SB UK with tones to die for. Get both, and some Toob cabs with them, is my advice. You can always sell the ones that don't work for you on this forum

    -Steve (doc)

  17. #166

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    Jack, Tal. I tried this out using just a capacitor connecting the tip and sleeve of a ts connector and plugged it into the return of the quilter fx loop. Long story short this does what you want and requires minimal additional gadgets. I’m sure it could be hardwired internally to the amp itself but if you don’t want to mod the amp, this does the trick.

    Quilter Amps-5cefb7b8-060d-49fa-8c44-528ef5601a87-jpg
    Last edited by omphalopsychos; 12-01-2022 at 06:29 PM.

  18. #167

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    Quote Originally Posted by omphalopsychos
    Jack, Tal. I tried this out using just a capacitor connecting the tip and sleeve of a ts Jack and plugged it into the return of the quilter fx loop. Long story short this does what you want and requires minimal additional gadgets. I’m sure it could be hardwired internally to the amp itself but if you don’t want to mod the amp, this does the trick.
    So you only need to put a capacitor between the active and the ground of the f/x return? Doesn't plugging a jack only in the f/x return block the signal from the preamp?
    I guess a tone pot can also be attached this way to make the grounding variable. But would that short circuit the amp if the tone pot is completely open? Does that question make sense?

  19. #168

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    That's a great question, and I was scratching my head about it too. At first I didn't understand Jack's recommendation to put a capacitor only in the return until I tried it out. I actually started this by wiring two TS male connectors together with a capacitor connecting one of the tips to ground. Just out of curiosity, I decided to plug in only one side of it and I was surprised to find the result was the same. So then I removed all the wires and left only the connector with the cap and it still worked.

    I did some more messing around to understand how this loop works, since the result was surprising. What I found was that the fx send/return jacks do not act as a loop unless BOTH jacks have connectors plugged in. If only one is plugged in, then it's just another connection point in the signal path. This is why connecting the jack to one of them works. It's the same as simply adding a capacitor in the circuit bleeding treble to ground.

    I also confirmed that this works both in the send and the return.

    So there you go. Problem solved for anyone who loves quilter amps but finds the treble too shrill. Thanks Jack for suggesting it.
    Last edited by omphalopsychos; 12-01-2022 at 06:56 PM.

  20. #169

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    Quote Originally Posted by omphalopsychos
    That's a great question, and I was scratching my head about it too. At first I didn't understand Jack's recommendation to put a capacitor only in the return until I tried it out. I actually started this by wiring two TS male connectors together with a capacitor connecting one of the tips to ground. Just out of curiosity, I decided to plug in only one side of it and I was surprised to find the result was the same. So then I removed all the wires and left only the connector with the cap and it still worked.

    I did some more messing around to understand how this loop works, since the result was surprising. What I found was that the fx send/return jacks do not act as a loop unless BOTH jacks have connectors plugged in. If only one is plugged in, then it's just another connection point in the signal path. This is why connecting the jack to one of them works. It's the same as simply adding a capacitor in the circuit bleeding treble to ground.

    I also confirmed that this works both in the send and the return.

    So there you go. Problem solved for anyone who loves quilter amps but finds the treble too shrill. Thanks Jack for suggesting it.
    Very cool. What value cap did you use?

  21. #170

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    This one is .047 uF, which is just what I had at hand, but you should try some different values to see what you like.

  22. #171

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    Quote Originally Posted by HighSpeedSpoon
    Tubes are irrelevant and I'm all for solid state progress, but $900 for a amp with an 8" speaker? For $400 you can get a Cube with a 12" speaker. This Quilter thing better be friggin magical for that kind of bread. But hey, if you try it and it is, well then let us know.
    Or you can get a Henriksen with a 6” speaker for what, about $1,300? It’s not necessarily about cost vs. displacement.

    I’m not sure tubes are quite irrelevant yet either, but everyone is chasing the sound that speaks to them. It always comes down to the sound.

  23. #172

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jonathan0996
    It always comes down to the sound.
    This!!!

  24. #173

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    Quote Originally Posted by omphalopsychos
    I tried this out using just a capacitor connecting the tip and sleeve...
    Top gear and gizmo post! Love your intrepid MacGrubering. Thanks for doing the research.

  25. #174

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    Quote Originally Posted by ccroft
    Top gear and gizmo post! Love your intrepid MacGrubering. Thanks for doing the research.
    I think you meant MacGuyvering

  26. #175

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    Well Jack, the great thing about this place is sometimes we get to learn something new



    Thanks for putting Omph in motion! It's an interesting hack, and I got to learn something new.